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Old 11-07-2013, 10:31 AM
 
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Help me out, especially any HR gurus out here. Is it possible for a position to be described as salaried, but then it is paid hourly? I thought it couldn't go both ways.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:52 AM
 
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They are by definition paid differently. What does the description say? Is it just 'competitive salary'? Because something as vague as that does not indicate the position is a salaried position. They may say the salary is 50k/year - but that might be saying that at the hourly rate and working 40 hrs/week means you make 50k a year, not necessarily that it is a salaried position.
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:01 AM
 
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Even with salaried positions (exempt) they will often tell you what your hourly rate is as they would with hourly (non exempt) positions. I know I track the rates for all of mine.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Even with salaried positions (exempt) they will often tell you what your hourly rate is as they would with hourly (non exempt) positions. I know I track the rates for all of mine.
Yes, more often than not, but that hourly rate is based on a 40 hour week and has no bearing on the actual pay per hour. Some weeks you could make a lot less per hour if you work more hours, some weeks more if you work less than 40. The monthly salary is what remains the same regardless of hours worked.
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
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You should get clarification from HR. Is it an exempt position? If so, it is salaried and you will be paid the same amount every pay period, regardless of the amount worked.

If it is not-exempt, you are paid for hours worked, plus OT rates over 40.

There are some exceptions to the above, primarily when state law modifies OT rules, but my general statement probably covers 80% of positions.
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
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Are you exempt under FLSA? That's the primary determination if you receive a flat salary, or hourly/OT.
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Simmering in DFW
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Any job can be paid hourly, but if that is the case all hours worked must be paid for even those weekends and 10 hour days...but they only have to be paid for with straight time. If you are an exempt employee and your company "docks" your pay in hourly increments and actually withholds pay vs. applying your benefit banked hours, then they have now treated you as a non-exempt status and you are entitled to all pay rewards as a non-exempt employee.

The jobs that are non-Exempt require that Employers pay time and one-half for work done over 40 hours a week.

Automated pay systems are sometimes set up to calculate all employees' rates down to an hourly basis for purposes of holiday pay or PTO and that sometimes confuses Exempt employees who then think they are being paid on an hourly basis. That is not the case, they system is merely developing a wage basis for the day rate for purposes of sick or vacation pay.
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:23 PM
 
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One of the restrictions on "exempt" work is you are paid on a basis no more frequent than weekly, and the figure cannot vary depending on amount of work performed. So if you are being paid hourly you are by definition "non-exempt" with all that implies.

Of course a position can be described as salaried and then paid hourly, but that would just be an incorrect description.
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:38 PM
MJ7
 
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all salaried jobs are technically hourly rates, you just can charge for 40 hrs a week. if you are allowed to work more hours on a particular project (approved by your supervisor) then the company may have the option to pay you more than 40 hrs per week.

most people think they have to work 50-60 hrs a week when salaried and only get paid for 40, the idea here is to work smarter not harder or longer...usually the older generation has problems understanding this concept and are stuck in their stubborn world.
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Old 05-22-2017, 07:59 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,791 times
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The office staff at my job get paid salary. They get the same amount every week, but they are now taking hours away from the hourly paid employees giving themselves more hours an cutting our hours. Is this legal? I thought if you got paid salary, you couldn't be paid hourly as well...This isn't right. They are cutting our hours intentionally to get more hours for themselves to work the houses and taking money out of our pocket! Does anyone know who i would call about this? Labor board? Ombudsman?
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