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Old 10-18-2014, 01:51 AM
 
Location: Sweden
22,868 posts, read 64,904,878 times
Reputation: 17823

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
....Oh, some of us Americans allow ourselves to believe all sorts of things about countries we have never been to. Stick around. Someone will show up and tell you all about yourself.....
I have learned so much about Sweden since I joined this forum.
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Old 10-18-2014, 07:55 AM
 
1,152 posts, read 957,930 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigSwede View Post
I have learned so much about Sweden since I joined this forum.
Now that is funny!
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Old 10-18-2014, 09:31 AM
 
148 posts, read 143,105 times
Reputation: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
No they don't. 2/3rd of Americans workers don't work 40 hours per week, let alone more than 40 hours.

edit; actually more like 3/4ths.
Average annual hours actually worked per worker
(note you'll have to use the tables as they are not reflected in the URL)

That data is incredibly iffy just by looking at it.

There are a lot of data gaps in the USA ones and the rest uses past or incomplete data. Eg the weekly stats are based on monthly figures from the 2000 census!
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Old 10-18-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,859 posts, read 3,713,248 times
Reputation: 15267
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhwanderlust View Post
If people worked fewer hours, there would be fewer unemployed people because they could share the workload.

They'd both be much more effective too, since they wouldn't be fatigued.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.2089 View Post
Let me clarify a little. The article is referring mainly to a typical 8 hour day...which over 4 days is around 32 hours. The point is that less hours worked resulted in higher productivity and morale- not an extra day off. Also since it would be fewer hours your pay would be affected.
The number of "under-employed" would go up. People getting paid less for fewer hours worked would require those same people to pick up a 2nd job to make up for the loss.

As far as sharing the workload...no thanks. I have my system and my way of doing things. Don't mess with my system! It works.
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Old 10-18-2014, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,019 posts, read 7,196,376 times
Reputation: 49965
Most hospitals have adopted the 3 day work week with 12 hour shifts. Some like it but most don't. It's physically hard and for those employees with two jobs it's the most difficult. They work 5 12 hour shifts. How would you like someone that burned out taking care of you or your loved one?
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Old 10-18-2014, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,437 posts, read 15,041,010 times
Reputation: 11924
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
Most hospitals have adopted the 3 day work week with 12 hour shifts. Some like it but most don't. It's physically hard and for those employees with two jobs it's the most difficult. They work 5 12 hour shifts. How would you like someone that burned out taking care of you or your loved one?
I don't know what it'd be any different than someone working nine eight-hour shifts a week. That means on at least two days, you're doing a double. If you have one day off a week, you're working three doubles. Two days off a week you're working four doubles.
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Old 10-18-2014, 01:13 PM
 
1,152 posts, read 957,930 times
Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I don't know what it'd be any different than someone working nine eight-hour shifts a week. That means on at least two days, you're doing a double. If you have one day off a week, you're working three doubles. Two days off a week you're working four doubles.
I work 12's now, but live at the site while working. I wouldn't want to do 12's if I had to commute home every day, unless I lived just 10 minutes away. If you have to go back and forth, an 8 or 10 hour day is much better, even if there are more than 5 in a row.
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Old 10-18-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
1,548 posts, read 1,869,471 times
Reputation: 3875
My industry (machining one of a kind prototype solutions) is 4 days a week 10 hour shifts M-Th for the hourly machinists. As CAD, CAM engineer I am salaried so I end up working up to 6 12s at the beginning of major projects....

Being an engineer is terrible. If I could do it again I'd just go to a 2 year school and become a machinist. Machinists work 4 10s in high end shops and get paid over time for anything above it. The machinists only make slightly less than I do and work 4-12 hours less per week. Oh and they don't sign their life away on every project either.

Sometimes, maybe 60% of the weeks per year. I do get a 4 / 10 week. It's pretty sweet.
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Old 10-18-2014, 03:29 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,728 times
Reputation: 15
I work 4 10-14 hour days per week and love it. My average week is around 46 hours. I'm a Truck Driver/Representative. I love all the days off. The only down side is how exhausted I get from the long work days.

In my opinion many businesses are better sticking with the traditional m-f 8:00-5:00. Some of my friends own small businesses and don't want to pay overtime or hire part time employees to cover one day.
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Old 10-18-2014, 05:39 PM
 
155 posts, read 176,917 times
Reputation: 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.2089 View Post
Interesting idea for a 4 day work week in U.S. in an article I read. I'll outline it here (link at bottom).

1. Countries that work less are happier

2. Shorter work weeks don't hurt economically

3. Increased productivity with a 4 day work week


Obviously one of the downsides I see is less pay as well as some scheduling concerns regarding the actual workweek. But some of the top happiest countries (norway, sweden) have implemented the 4 day workweek successfully. The article also points out that although productivity has increased overall in the U.S.in a normal 5 day work week, it has been at the cost of decreased morale and longer hours worked.

Some numbers I stole from forbes.com:

36% of employers allow at least some employees to work a 4 day week while only 7% let all employees do this.

44% of female doctors work 4 day weeks (didnt see a number for male)

86% of men and 67% women work more than 40hrs in any given week

So have any you experienced a 4 day work week? Do you think its a good idea? Thoughts please.

Links: 1. Forbes

Wallst
Interesting! Thanks for sharing.
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