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Old 10-17-2014, 03:30 PM
 
31 posts, read 32,451 times
Reputation: 12

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I applied for a temp-to-perm position and got a phone call about it the next day. The job posting was from the actual company itself and said nothing about being through an agency or anything, and the person who called me was the HR Manager for the company. She talked to me a bit about my experience and salary requirements, then asked if I could come in on Monday for an interview with herself and the VP of HR. She said that it's temp-to-perm because they want to see if the person is a good fit for the role and the company.
She said the salary is 35-40k, which is what I'm looking for. My question is, is it normal for companies to have temp-to-perm positions without going through temp agencies? Also, would I get paid that amount even while in the 'temp' phase? And any success stories with positions like this actually turning permanent?
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Old 10-17-2014, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,704 posts, read 9,095,596 times
Reputation: 4068
I worked briefly for a company that did that and I questioned the legailty of it, but it did seem to be a good way to screen potential hires and both parties got a "trial" period to see if the job was a good fit before being offered a permanent position with benefits.

The temp phase usually lasts about 90 days. I'd be sure and ask that question, because there are some legalities associated with having someone on the payroll and not treating them as a regular employee after a period of time.

I'd say it's certainly worth checking into if it's a job you're interested in.
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Old 10-17-2014, 03:38 PM
 
31 posts, read 32,451 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlady View Post
I worked briefly for a company that did that and I questioned the legailty of it, but it did seem to be a good way to screen potential hires and both parties got a "trial" period to see if the job was a good fit before being offered a permanent position with benefits.

The temp phase usually lasts about 90 days. I'd be sure and ask that question, because there are some legalities associated with having someone on the payroll and not treating them as a regular employee after a period of time.

I'd say it's certainly worth checking into if it's a job you're interested in.
Yeah, the first question on my list is how long the temp phase will last. I have had other interviews this week, but I am getting pretty desperate so I wouldn't turn it down if it was offered to me (depending on how the interview goes, of course) since the pay is decent. Were you the employee working in the temp phase at that company, or was it someone else? How did it pan out?
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Old 10-17-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Pacifica, CA
297 posts, read 630,838 times
Reputation: 243
My current job started this way. I was offered an hourly wage and the hiring manager sent me a word document template to complete an invoice for my hours worked at the end of each month. It was supposed to be only for 30 days, but ended up lasting 45 because they were just too busy to get the paperwork done. Your wages while being a contractor and not an employee will likely not have taxes removed and should be paid hourly, as opposed to salaried, so make sure the hourly wage accounts for the fact that you'll have to pay double the taxes on it when you file your tax return next year (you'll receive a 1099 instead of W2). A lot of companies now do this because it saves on a lot of paperwork if the person doesn't work out. I had no problems with the arrangement and it worked out just fine, i'm still at the company 2+ years later.
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Old 10-17-2014, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,704 posts, read 9,095,596 times
Reputation: 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by aa30 View Post
Yeah, the first question on my list is how long the temp phase will last. I have had other interviews this week, but I am getting pretty desperate so I wouldn't turn it down if it was offered to me (depending on how the interview goes, of course) since the pay is decent. Were you the employee working in the temp phase at that company, or was it someone else? How did it pan out?
Actually, I was the hiring supervisor, but it was all done through HR. I honestly don't remember letting someone go after 90 days. Most employees either worked out and we converted them to perm fairly quickly or they left on their own terms.
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Old 10-17-2014, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,197 posts, read 12,411,454 times
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They actually do need to issue a w-2 and withold taxes for the temp period. The fact it is temp not perm does not change the criteria for 1099 vs w-2. If you have a boss giving you assignments and directing your hours and how you are doing things it needs to be w-2.

As for temp-to-perm. Given the statistic that only 27% of said jobs are ever made perm I would be highly skeptical to the point of continuing to actively seek direct employment after starting.
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Old 10-17-2014, 05:08 PM
 
31 posts, read 32,451 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
They actually do need to issue a w-2 and withold taxes for the temp period. The fact it is temp not perm does not change the criteria for 1099 vs w-2. If you have a boss giving you assignments and directing your hours and how you are doing things it needs to be w-2.

As for temp-to-perm. Given the statistic that only 27% of said jobs are ever made perm I would be highly skeptical to the point of continuing to actively seek direct employment after starting.
If I get offered this position, I definitely plan on continuing my job search in case it doesn't work out! It would be nice to actually make some money while job searching and have the prospect of a permanent position, but I wouldn't want to risk being unemployed again.
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