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Old 10-21-2014, 10:38 PM
 
6,971 posts, read 10,892,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiecta View Post
I definitely would not count Mechanical engineering in there. I am an ME and I can safely say that me and all of the guys and girls in my extended study group came out of college with degrees well above the average liberal arts entry salary. In 2007, out of the 6 guys and 2 girls we had, I think the lowest starting salary any of us took was around $55,000. Of the ones I keep in touch with, most of us have had significant bumps in pay over the past 7 years as well.

Now, of course you can still make some good money with some liberal arts degrees depending on what you do, but as a whole I cannot support the idea that it is a myth that MEs don't really pay more than liberal arts degrees. Liberal Arts is too broad too to compare to one specific type of engineering anyway.
I work with a bunch of MEs. They get paid OK, but not too much more than somebody who has the same amount of experience with a business or psychology degree, etc. I mean 10, 15K more? That's not that much more.

I'm talking median/averages. If you got 65K to start as an ME, then you're already above the median of what experienced MEs make.

Mechanical Engineer Salary (United States)

The payscale is similar for Civil.
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
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In my personal experience as an ME, at least in my industry(not just my company), those numbers are quite low. I'm in a low cost of living area and I'm 'off the chart' with <8 years experience based on payscales numbers. I haven't job hopped or been aggressive pushing for raises either.

The thing thing that makes it hard to compare is that you are trying to look at one specific job title "Mechanical Engineer" versus a broad type of degree (liberal arts). That really is the definition of apples to oranges. Tons of "Mechanical Engineers" don't even work in engineering jobs where that is their title. That does not include the amount of people with an ME degree that go into higher levels of management or onto other jobs where the ME was the gateway key even though they aren't utilizing their degree directly.

Last edited by jamiecta; 10-22-2014 at 06:46 AM..
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,207 posts, read 12,477,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everdeen View Post
You may want to check your numbers on salaries. Only some teachers make more and we do work way into the wee hours and holidays. We just don't have students who are with us during those hours.
The ones here just went on strike and are making a median salary of $70k with pensions for 9 months work.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:00 AM
 
6,971 posts, read 10,892,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiecta View Post
In my personal experience as an ME, at least in my industry(not just my company), those numbers are quite low. I'm in a low cost of living area and I'm 'off the chart' with <8 years experience based on payscales numbers. I haven't job hopped or been aggressive pushing for raises either.

The thing thing that makes it hard to compare is that you are trying to look at one specific job title "Mechanical Engineer" versus a broad type of degree (liberal arts). That really is the definition of apples to oranges. Tons of "Mechanical Engineers" don't even work in engineering jobs where that is their title. That does not include the amount of people with an ME degree that go into higher levels of management or onto other jobs where the ME was the gateway key even though they aren't utilizing their degree directly.
What can I say, you're lucky. Some elementary school teachers make 40K after 10 years. Some make six figures.

The #s I see for the MEs I work with are pretty accurate. They bill at the same rate as the Civil Engineers, so I know how much they make. I also live in a very high cost area.

I also know somebody who has an Aerospace Engineering degree from a good school and he got a job with Boeing as a mech/structural engineer. He was (obviously) really lucky to get that job and he started at 60K.

As I might to say to everybody here who makes a ton of money with little experience. Get me a job? Lol.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:10 AM
 
3,520 posts, read 4,381,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
The ones here just went on strike and are making a median salary of $70k with pensions for 9 months work.
I don't know where here is, maybe, Dearfield? There are some areas where some teachers make that, but it is usually a place that has a high cost of living and a upper middle to upper income class areas. It's not even close to the norm. And often, when districts report the salaries, they also throw in what the district pays for health benefits, retirement, social security, etc. So it's not a true number and people will think that teachers make more than they actually do. I don't know if that is going on where you are, but it happens in my district.

Most teachers, by the way, are prohibited, like police and firemen, from striking, by state law. Again, that does seem to be the case where you are.

The nine months of work is a misnomer in many subjects. We often work throughout the summer getting things ready. Not at the same pace, but work for no pay, nonetheless.

To do the bare minimum is a 60 - 70 hour a week job. I work every weekend, holiday, and throughout the summer. All uncompensated.

Anyone who thinks that teachers are overcompensated, should give it a whirl. You're a chemist, right? There is a huge shortage of science teachers.
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Old 10-22-2014, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,207 posts, read 12,477,927 times
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There was a recent strike in Orland Park and they stated the median salary of the teachers there was $70k.

As for shortage of science teachers anytime I hear science and shortage in the same sentence my BS alarm goes off. Perhaps in some rural districts where they pay teachers $28k and are shocked that they have to settle for having a liberal arts grad teach science.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:38 AM
 
6,971 posts, read 10,892,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Everdeen View Post
I don't know where here is, maybe, Dearfield? There are some areas where some teachers make that, but it is usually a place that has a high cost of living and a upper middle to upper income class areas. It's not even close to the norm. And often, when districts report the salaries, they also throw in what the district pays for health benefits, retirement, social security, etc. So it's not a true number and people will think that teachers make more than they actually do. I don't know if that is going on where you are, but it happens in my district.

Most teachers, by the way, are prohibited, like police and firemen, from striking, by state law. Again, that does seem to be the case where you are.

The nine months of work is a misnomer in many subjects. We often work throughout the summer getting things ready. Not at the same pace, but work for no pay, nonetheless.

To do the bare minimum is a 60 - 70 hour a week job. I work every weekend, holiday, and throughout the summer. All uncompensated.

Anyone who thinks that teachers are overcompensated, should give it a whirl. You're a chemist, right? There is a huge shortage of science teachers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
There was a recent strike in Orland Park and they stated the median salary of the teachers there was $70k.

As for shortage of science teachers anytime I hear science and shortage in the same sentence my BS alarm goes off. Perhaps in some rural districts where they pay teachers $28k and are shocked that they have to settle for having a liberal arts grad teach science.
What you are seeing here is what I see all over CD forum. People getting paid an enormous amount more for than others having the same credentials/experience/work ethic.

Nowhere is it more evident than public school teachers. Their salaries are also public. You could have a teacher making 50K with 25 years of experience and another one making 70K with less than 4.
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Old 10-23-2014, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
2,996 posts, read 4,719,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
What can I say, you're lucky. Some elementary school teachers make 40K after 10 years. Some make six figures.

The #s I see for the MEs I work with are pretty accurate. They bill at the same rate as the Civil Engineers, so I know how much they make. I also live in a very high cost area.

I also know somebody who has an Aerospace Engineering degree from a good school and he got a job with Boeing as a mech/structural engineer. He was (obviously) really lucky to get that job and he started at 60K.

As I might to say to everybody here who makes a ton of money with little experience. Get me a job? Lol.
I really don't think I'm lucky - from the other MEs I graduated with who work all around the country, my salary is pretty in line. Like I said in my previous post, look at the actual job title you are referencing on payscale. It's pretty specific. If you notice, the title of "Mechanical Engineer" that you chose, is a pay scale heavily based on entry-level positions. 60% of the people/jobs associated with that payscale had <5 years experience. Only around 15% had more than 9 years experience. The payscale you chose is not representative of the career pair for an ME, rather entry-level pay which is on par which my experience of entry-level ME pay.

If you use the same exact site and just bump up one generic level of experience, the national average is around $91,000 which one again lines up pretty well with my experience. Also note that this is only *salary* Payscale (since this is the site you chose to reference) clearly shows that for these MEs with >5 years experience, along with the national average salary of $91,000 (median of $88k), that does not include any various bonuses, profit sharing, or commissions that many of these jobs come with. With these factors included, the median total pay for MEs with >5 years experience (per payscale) is closer to $98,000. Once again this is fairly in line with my experience.

I just want to make sure you understand the numbers you are looking at. You can't utilize an entry level ME job ID to detail the career salary.
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Old 10-23-2014, 08:30 AM
 
6,971 posts, read 10,892,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamiecta View Post
I really don't think I'm lucky - from the other MEs I graduated with who work all around the country, my salary is pretty in line. Like I said in my previous post, look at the actual job title you are referencing on payscale. It's pretty specific. If you notice, the title of "Mechanical Engineer" that you chose, is a pay scale heavily based on entry-level positions. 60% of the people/jobs associated with that payscale had <5 years experience. Only around 15% had more than 9 years experience. The payscale you chose is not representative of the career pair for an ME, rather entry-level pay which is on par which my experience of entry-level ME pay.

If you use the same exact site and just bump up one generic level of experience, the national average is around $91,000 which one again lines up pretty well with my experience. Also note that this is only *salary* Payscale (since this is the site you chose to reference) clearly shows that for these MEs with >5 years experience, along with the national average salary of $91,000 (median of $88k), that does not include any various bonuses, profit sharing, or commissions that many of these jobs come with. With these factors included, the median total pay for MEs with >5 years experience (per payscale) is closer to $98,000. Once again this is fairly in line with my experience.

I just want to make sure you understand the numbers you are looking at. You can't utilize an entry level ME job ID to detail the career salary.
I realize that skews towards those with less experience, but you said you were 'off the chart'.

Which leads me to believe you make 100K+ in a low cost of living area with 7 or less years of experience. Which if you live in South Carolina, is probably equivalent to 125K here. The engineering managers make close to that, but they are all over 40 and have many years of experience. I mean, we are not Boeing or BMW, but I already explained that.

I can you that the MEs I work with here would be beating down the door to take your job. Most of them have many more years of experience than that, and make less.

Also, by most measures, MEs and CEs make comparable salaries. So, I was also going off that. And I know for sure what CEs make because I am one and have worked with them my whole life. 100K would be 'somewhat standard' for a person with 15 years of experience, a PE, and a Masters.

Like I said, get me a job, or tell me the name of the companies that you know are paying these salaries. Lol.

Last edited by jobaba; 10-23-2014 at 09:41 AM..
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:06 AM
 
3,520 posts, read 4,381,664 times
Reputation: 4601
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSchemist80 View Post
There was a recent strike in Orland Park and they stated the median salary of the teachers there was $70k.

As for shortage of science teachers anytime I hear science and shortage in the same sentence my BS alarm goes off. Perhaps in some rural districts where they pay teachers $28k and are shocked that they have to settle for having a liberal arts grad teach science.
That's prohibited by federal law unless it's a substitute teacher.

There are some areas that have a high average salary. New Jersey is another one that comes to mind. It's not the norm. Teaching K-12 science is very demanding. I can get the certification put on my license because I have taken many science classes, but will not. Most science teachers work the longest and hardest hours.

The nationwide statistics for the attrition rate of teachers who leave the field is 50% in the first five years. I don't know of any other college required profession that has people willingly leaving the field at that rate. Of course there are some districts that someone has to die or retire in order to get a position, and you better have juice to get it. But for every one of those, there are a hundred schools that lose half their staff every year.
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