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Old 10-21-2014, 05:23 PM
MJ7
 
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I don't put stock into it, some people might.
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Old 10-21-2014, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Annandale, VA
5,098 posts, read 4,134,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
That said, job hoppers can even be your best workers. This is because, in reality, they're simply top performers who are overly-ambitious about their career goals.

They want to go out of their way to impress you with their work ethic in the hopes of receiving rapid advancement and huge pay increases in return.

They become disillusioned job hoppers once they realize the company they're working for can't afford to offer them the huge increases in pay or the rapid career advancement they desire (and deserve).

They want to step over everyone on their way up the ladder without paying their dues with YEARS of service with the same employer.
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Old 10-21-2014, 06:19 PM
 
2,242 posts, read 2,202,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaten_Drinker View Post
They want to step over everyone on their way up the ladder without paying their dues with YEARS of service with the same employer.
This has been my experience as well. New for this year's performance reviews we are grading people on how they meet their objectives instead of just meeting and exceeding them. So if you trample everyone on the way up, in theory you will not be rewarded. We'll see how this works in practice.
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:04 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,500,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheapdad00 View Post
This has been my experience as well. New for this year's performance reviews we are grading people on how they meet their objectives instead of just meeting and exceeding them. So if you trample everyone on the way up, in theory you will not be rewarded. We'll see how this works in practice.
And it's certainly your prerogative and a-ok if you want to put something like that in practice.

But at the same:

1. Will you honestly convey this reason to these same employees who are wondering why they're not getting ahead, and not play coy with them by giving them vague corporate-esque responses?

2. Would you also be ok with these same employees you're holding back jumping ship (instead of remaining loyal) simply because of whatever pecking order your organization has in place?
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:14 PM
 
3,439 posts, read 3,259,596 times
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Without knowing the reason for each job change, it's not really fair in this terrible job market to jump to conclusions.

Some companies go belly-up. Some places are just really bad. A friend was told to stop getting coffee from the kitchenette because upper management didn't like to see people up from their desks. He stuck it out there for a couple of years. I once was at a company where bathroom time was considered unpaid. There are a million war stories like that; sometimes you just can't stay somewhere because life is too short, and if the new employer can't accept your reasoning, then eff'em, move on to someone else.

This fellow who wrote this blog, he has his way of selecting people that undoubtedly works for him, but in my opinion he's throwing a few good fish back in the pond out of simple prejudice about short term jobs. That's his tough luck; someone else will get those good employees who may turn out to be stellar and long term if they are in the right situation.

I'm in my 50s, in technology, and I'm coming up on five years at my current job. This is the LONGEST I've ever been at any job since I began working. I'm not proud of my job hopping; that's just been the reality of my particular field where you work for 1-3 years and then it's time to move on. The place where you are maybe got too political and you stopped getting any interesting assignments, or maybe no assignments at all, as happened to me once or twice. The place got purchased and you were laid off. A better job came along with 50% more money.

In a dynamic economy with at-will employees, this stuff happens, and this is the kind of disruption that actually builds great wealth. Jobs and Wozniak left their nice, safe corporate positions and started a business in a garage that grew into the world's most valuable company.

This guy can keep his 5-10 year accountants. I'm more excited about people (young or middle or old) who have lots of fresh ideas and enthusiasm and restlessness for new horizons.
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Old 10-21-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 5,915,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
The environment has changed significantly for those who are entering the work force now and trying to progress in their careers.

In the wake of the recession, many folks have to contend with companies that are either growing very slowly (because of how low customer demand remains and how debt-laden these companies are), have offshored the lion's share of their operations, or companies that have flat-lined in growth. Long gone are the days of 5%-10% raises each year, clear/steady career progression, pensions and thousand dollar bonuses for high performance.

Job hopping will become the new norm as people continue to adjust to our new economy. These lifers, as I call them, will soon be moving on and a younger, more in-touch group of workers will take their place.

(as a aside, the blog entry in the OP is strongly biased. Of course it would be in a start up's best interest to have employees who are willing to roll over and take their crap for several years until they're on their feet, profitability/growth-wise. That's only one small segment of the business world however)

Define lifers and then...explain how a younger group of workers taking their place are "more in-touch". In touch with what? How are they ''more in-touch'' and what are they ''more in-touch'' with?

More dystopia?
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Old 10-21-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 5,915,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I've been reading this article online,

"Never hire job hoppers, never. They make the worst employees"

Never Hire Job Hoppers. Never. They Make Terrible Employees

This article makes couple pretty interesting points.

a. GenY’ers / Millennials or whatever people under 30 want to be called these days that job hoppers look like “flakes.” I simply sent a supporting Tweet saying that I agreed.

b. But this isn’t a post about Millennials – it’s about job hoppers of all ages and I know plenty of my fellow Gen X’ers who are running for the door at the first sign of trouble. Look at some of the uber-successful icons of Silicon Valley / Technology:

Never Hire Job Hoppers. Never. They Make Terrible Employees

Never Hire Job Hoppers. Never. They Make Terrible Employees

Do you agree with this article? Why or why not

Thanks
Don't need to read the articles as the thread title summed it up.

In my field, 5-6 years was a good run. I worked with satellite projects, mainly setting up the ground system, ironing out the kinks, launching the satellite and ensuring the people hired to babysit it could do so.
It was then on to another contract. Engineers and technicians don't stick around after the fun is gone. We want to move on and build another one. Good thing there are a lot of them to build. Most engineers I knew moved every 5-6 years. It is a continuing education - the more you assimilate the more you know and can apply to other projects. I don't know of many who stayed with any one entity unless they were made.
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Old 10-21-2014, 08:52 PM
 
7,238 posts, read 10,500,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
Define lifers and then...explain how a younger group of workers taking their place are "more in-touch". In touch with what? How are they ''more in-touch'' and what are they ''more in-touch'' with?
Certainly!!! I'm glad you asked!!!

"Lifers" are those who have been in corporations for 10-20+ years and have never faced unemployment during the recent recession. This doesn't apply to all folks who fit this characteristic, but many of them seem to think the economy works the same way they did when they found their jobs in the 80s or 90s (or even the 50s or 60s), when the economy was booming. In effect, they're "out-of-touch" with the realities of the new economy.

I decided to use that term to describe them in that post (those who spend a figurative "lifetime" with an employer) instead of laying out a definition like you requested, but I can understand why some would have a problem with it.

Meanwhile, the folks who are just entering the work force now in entry level positions (Millennials) are witnessing how much tougher it is to launch one's career in the post-recession era with just one company and are more likely to understand why workers would job hop instead of simply deeming them as disloyal or bad employees. They will be taking on these management positions in which they decide who gets hired/promoted and who doesn't as the "lifers" pass on.

Last edited by 313Weather; 10-21-2014 at 09:02 PM..
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Old 10-21-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,513 posts, read 50,877,777 times
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I have no problem with hiring someone for a higher paying, more responsible position, when their "job hopping" showed that same pattern. If their history showed leaving for less responsible and/or lower paying jobs more than once (could be explainable) I would probably not interview them.
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Old 10-21-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,649 posts, read 18,541,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
Most engineers I knew moved every 5-6 years. It is a continuing education - the more you assimilate the more you know and can apply to other projects. I don't know of many who stayed with any one entity unless they were made.
This explains my ex's situation. He has worked for at least 4 maybe more fortune 500 tech companies in the past 10 something years. He is a senior software engineer.
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