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Old 10-27-2014, 10:48 AM
 
Location: East TX
2,085 posts, read 1,837,064 times
Reputation: 3175

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After looking at this and the other thread, let me be blunt. Things to do:

1.) Finish the degree that you are currently invested in and then quit looking at training and school. It is time to join the real world.
2. Get yourself on job boards in the following, set up a keyword search in each type of job board so you get daily emails for any related positions you might be qualified for:
a) state job service/unemployment site (such as wisc.jobs or workintexas.com) for your state
b) governmentjobs.com
c) usajobs.gov
d) whatever school you are going to has an employment office or career help at the alumni office, get with them about options
e) google for jobs in any field you may be interested in, and then use Indeed or other engines to find the jobs. Try "finance jobs" for example, then look at the associated links

For many positions other than specialized or technical stuff, government doesn't require that your degree be in a specific field, only that you hold a degree. That is why I suggested a lot of government sites above. In the meantime, if you love the academic world you can always teach classes at night school or local tech college for additional money. There is work to be had but the employers will not come knocking on your door. You need to be aggressive and take the situation on full steam ahead. If you want to make excuses, then languish about on your own.Try some stuff - see what works. See what you like. If you find something isn't a field you like, change. In the meantime, you can get paid for learning something new.
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Old 10-27-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Hampton Roads
3,026 posts, read 3,582,569 times
Reputation: 4381
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmb501 View Post
I'm willing to bet you haven't tried teaching kids as a sub; you're lucky if you can get them to pay attention.
In my state, you could be a short-term sub as long as you had 60 hours of college, so I have been a substitute before as a way to earn some money. I was then hired in as a second grade paraprofessional while earning my degree and then worked with special needs children throughout summers. Try again.
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Old 10-27-2014, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,029 posts, read 1,161,280 times
Reputation: 1982
Does your college career services offer information on "where to look, how to market to a potential employer, or what skill set would match which job?"

I would think the local unemployment office should be able to point you to resources on how to do these things. You may need to ask specific questions. "How do I create a resume?" "How do I evaluate whether or not I match the skills the job posting lists?"

Different industries have different methods for finding a job. I know where to look for tech jobs, but not neccessarily where to look for, say, a job as a standardized test creator.

Use Google to your benefit. "Standardized test jobs" This brought up a list of companies hiring for these jobs as well as some blog posts describing what the job is like.

Then you can google something like "standardized test companies." Make a list of all the companies that hire the position you are interested in. Look at their websites to see what kinds of jobs are open. Many companies will allow you to subscribe to their job postings so you get an email when a new opening is posted.

I googled for a list of the 100 biggest companies in my area. I went down the list and checked every single company's website to see if they had positions that I would be qualified for.

We can't find a job for you, just like we can't give you all the information you need to be an effective classroom manager. A lot of this is stuff you can figure out yourself if you are willing to do the research.

Step 1 is making a plan. Even if that plan is a list of questions that you need to find the answer to.
Step 2 is DOING something.
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Old 10-27-2014, 11:27 AM
Status: "Basking in my white and height privilege" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,576 posts, read 8,659,063 times
Reputation: 18234
kmb, based on what you've posted in the past, you're a quiet person and you feel uncomfortable in settings where you don't know the people you're working with. The kids in your classes have complained that they cannot hear you, and that makes it difficult to take control.

Instead of changing jobs where you'll have the same problems, which would be setting yourself up to fail, why not do some things that will address these issues first? You could join Toastmaster's and take a speech class or two, gain confidence in front of strangers and learn how to project your voice and speak with authority. You may find out that you really do like teaching once you're able to take control in the classroom. If you decide you don't like teaching, you will have gained skills necessary to be successful in any job you might be considering.

My advice is to work on those things you know you need to work on and make a decision about a career change after that.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:06 PM
 
101 posts, read 99,271 times
Reputation: 286
I have a friend who does Technical writing for a company. She was an English major. She gets paid very well for someone two years out of school. But it seems like its very hard work, plus she work crazy hours during the week. Sometimes putting in 80 hr weeks. She loves the job though.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:12 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 1,972,493 times
Reputation: 1123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Random856 View Post
I have a friend who does Technical writing for a company. She was an English major. She gets paid very well for someone two years out of school. But it seems like its very hard work, plus she work crazy hours during the week. Sometimes putting in 80 hr weeks. She loves the job though.
I am wondering how did she land the technical writer job? Did she previous experience, did she simply apply through the company's website, did she have a portfolio of earlier technical writing type work?
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:29 PM
 
101 posts, read 99,271 times
Reputation: 286
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazeddude8 View Post
I am wondering how did she land the technical writer job? Did she previous experience, did she simply apply through the company's website, did she have a portfolio of earlier technical writing type work?
She has a friend who is also a technical writer at the company. Her friend told her about an opening, told her to apply and she got an interview and they hired her. I don't think she had any prior technical writing experience.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:40 PM
 
1,505 posts, read 1,972,493 times
Reputation: 1123
ty for the insight. Though no doubt having a friend informing her of the opening was helpful, the fact that she did not have prior technical writing experience shows that at the very least, there are employers that are still willing to train.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:41 PM
 
4,584 posts, read 6,172,867 times
Reputation: 5234
The question isn't what you can do with your degree the questions are what are your dreams and goals? Figure out the lifestyle you want to live and find the vehicle (Job/self-employed) that can afford you to live that lifestyle.

If you take a job consider starting a part-time business and work it nights and or weekends.
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Old 10-27-2014, 12:50 PM
 
4,279 posts, read 3,311,264 times
Reputation: 2874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caltovegas View Post
The question isn't what you can do with your degree the questions are what are your dreams and goals? Figure out the lifestyle you want to live and find the vehicle (Job/self-employed) that can afford you to live that lifestyle.

If you take a job consider starting a part-time business and work it nights and or weekends.
See, I would like to do that, but I don't know how. For one thing, my presentation is a bit off. I also don't know how to market my talents. For that matter, I don't even know how to find a mentor. It's really hard to find someone to train you in this economy.

By the way, please don't read that as rejecting your suggestion. I meant, "How can I learn how to successfully start a small business, market my talents, or find a mentor?" I just normally phrase it differently to come off as less eager. I guess I learned somewhere that it was the proper way to ask a question in conversation.

Last edited by krmb; 10-27-2014 at 01:02 PM..
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