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Old 01-14-2008, 06:05 PM
 
123 posts, read 561,833 times
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Heres a question I've always wondered. Not that I would consider doing it, I just wondered is it ok to omit previous jobs on your resumes/applications?

I get that you can't make up past jobs to bulk up your resume. But if you're applying to a professional job and want to keep a like image, and you really don't want to include that you worked part-time at Hub-a-Bubs HotDogs* at 23 years of age or mopped floors at an adult toystore* for 2 weeks in the summer, could you omit it without any repurcussions?
As long as you don't ADD any false jobs, is it ok to not inform the potential employers of a past occupation?

Just curious. I'm pretty sure everyone has an embarrassing job as a teen or a job that was ridiculously short-lived.


Thanks



*Completely fictional jobs
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Old 01-14-2008, 07:37 PM
 
2,496 posts, read 5,720,094 times
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You don't want to have any major gaps in your resume. Or at least any major "unexplainable" gaps. So if you really were working on a hot dog cart to make ends meet for 3 years between "career" jobs, you either want to admit to it and try to spin it - to fill the gap, or have a ready explanation on why for 3 years your resume says you were not employed.

Once you get into your career, especially if it was college and then a career, you'll start to leave off the jobs that don't relate to your career.

If your career is marketing executive, you're not going to put down that you worked at Walmart in HighSchool, or that you candy striped. But, if you did a marketing internship at WalMart your first summer after college, that (because it applies to your career) you might leave in - depending on how many other jobs you've had and how long its been.

You definitely want to show a 2-3 job window. Your current job, your last job (maybe that last job was college student), and maybe one job before that.

But if its been 25 years, then how relevant is the fact that you were a shoe sales clerk?

Use some common sense, and you'll be fine.
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Old 01-14-2008, 10:25 PM
 
1,671 posts, read 4,180,488 times
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It all depend on the job you're going for. If the job is doing a complete background search for the last 10 years and you worked those jobs on the books, than you must list them. If they were paid off the books, the answer is no. However, you must have information for the work gaps in emploment and be able to justify why you were not employed.
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Old 01-15-2008, 08:36 AM
 
267 posts, read 903,808 times
Reputation: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by arussell View Post
It all depend on the job you're going for. If the job is doing a complete background search for the last 10 years and you worked those jobs on the books, than you must list them.
Ok..how about a situation like this. You work for a company for 10 years but left suddenly without notice due to a problem with a supervisor. Do you have to list that problem supervisor by name on your resume/ job application? Should you give a name of another co-worker in place of the supervisor for the background check if they have to contact that employer?

I worked for this one company for almost 10 years. My boss was great, that is until he and his wife got divorced and he found "religion". Then everything became "morals" and such. Either you believed in what he did or else.

Plus he started developing emotional problems and saying off the wa11 things. Example..we had a client come in from Denver and he made the claim Denver is known as the Mile High City because everyone in Colorado does illegal drugs and has open relationships. He believed that !! The Denver client BTW took his business elsewhere.

If I were to apply for a job in Denver, would I want a weirdo like that contact my possible future employer? I would think not.

One day at a staff meeting, rather than talking about work, my boss went on about gay marriage and teenagers having sex. Neither of which had anything to do at all with our business. But my boss wouldnt talk about anything else. Not only did I walk out but so did 5 of my other co-workers that day. Lucky for me at the time I worked there, I had a second job and that job is listed on my resume. I wish I could list that job of my resume but my old boss is still there and I rather not have him go on about morals and why they "will go to hell" in reference checks about me.

Last edited by billybobwv; 01-15-2008 at 08:46 AM..
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Old 01-15-2008, 09:23 AM
 
5,870 posts, read 8,063,223 times
Reputation: 5854
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybobwv View Post
Ok..how about a situation like this. You work for a company for 10 years but left suddenly without notice due to a problem with a supervisor. Do you have to list that problem supervisor by name on your resume/ job application? Should you give a name of another co-worker in place of the supervisor for the background check if they have to contact that employer?

I worked for this one company for almost 10 years. My boss was great, that is until he and his wife got divorced and he found "religion". Then everything became "morals" and such. Either you believed in what he did or else.

Plus he started developing emotional problems and saying off the wa11 things. Example..we had a client come in from Denver and he made the claim Denver is known as the Mile High City because everyone in Colorado does illegal drugs and has open relationships. He believed that !! The Denver client BTW took his business elsewhere.

If I were to apply for a job in Denver, would I want a weirdo like that contact my possible future employer? I would think not.

One day at a staff meeting, rather than talking about work, my boss went on about gay marriage and teenagers having sex. Neither of which had anything to do at all with our business. But my boss wouldnt talk about anything else. Not only did I walk out but so did 5 of my other co-workers that day. Lucky for me at the time I worked there, I had a second job and that job is listed on my resume. I wish I could list that job of my resume but my old boss is still there and I rather not have him go on about morals and why they "will go to hell" in reference checks about me.
a) Your former employer will not contact your potential employer. The other way around.
b) You can list that job. Why not? Explain that you left your employment due to a change in climate; try to be very professional and detached about it when you talk about your manager's change in lifestyle and social skills. Normally applications have a "contact former employer" option.
c) 99.9% of all jobs will show up on an employer run credit check. Explain skeletons before they make an unannounced appearance.
d) You can sum up part-time jobs or those with no relevance to your current professional life under "various part-time from x to z" and be ready to go over them if necessary.
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Old 01-15-2008, 11:46 AM
 
186 posts, read 667,255 times
Reputation: 146
I can give you some insight . . .I'm a Certified Professional Resume Writer and Career Coach. This is a *very* common question. Here is the deal . . .

You *do not* have to list every single job on a resume. It is a fallacy. Also, please do not go back any further than 10-15 years on a resume *unless* they have a significant impact on your current target. Really, a potential employer will be most interested in your responsibilities *and* achievements from the past 5-7 years.

A resume should only be a brief overview of your qualifications; not a comprehensive life history. Most people tend to make this mistake when writing a resume, and subsequently, it becomes a book.

TWO PAGES IS NORMAL. Don't listen to the one-page gimmick. If you have something to say, then say it. Make sure it is relevant to the target at hand. With this in mind, I highly advise not going beyond two pages *unless* this is a curriculum vitae.

One thing you need to be aware of: If you do not write down every job on a resume, then *do not* write "See Resume" on an application. If you do, the resume automatically becomes a legal document.

To avoid gaps . . . use the year only . . . no months. Use the term "present" on a position for up to 6 months after leaving. Thereafter, you really should use the year of termination.

I hope this helps:-) Good luck!
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Old 01-15-2008, 04:03 PM
 
146 posts, read 749,536 times
Reputation: 109
What about being self employed? I started a small business four years ago in order to stay home with my son. Now I need to go back and find a "real job" as this just doesn't cut it anymore. But I am having no success in even getting an interview. I thought having my own business would be a plus but it is apparently a turn off to prospective employers.
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Old 01-15-2008, 04:33 PM
 
186 posts, read 667,255 times
Reputation: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dolly View Post
What about being self employed? I started a small business four years ago in order to stay home with my son. Now I need to go back and find a "real job" as this just doesn't cut it anymore. But I am having no success in even getting an interview. I thought having my own business would be a plus but it is apparently a turn off to prospective employers.
Actually it is a *plus.* However, be very careful in how you document this information.

For instance, never use a title such as "Owner." Instead, use a title that is operational such as "Manager," "Operations Director," "Sales Manager," etc. The reason for the title change is because some potential employer will hesitate hiring an entrepreneur strictly based upon the assumption of your ability to be managed, take direction, etc. They may say, "Well, she is used to working for herself; why bother hiring her, she'll probably leave later."

As an entrepreneur, you have wonderful advantages that include the following: Business plan development (if you did this), sales, marketing / advertising, managing the accounts payables / receivables, operations, taxes, etc.

It is all in the wording and approach. Also, feel free to open-up in your cover letter by stating that after managing your own busines for X amount of years (while raising your son), you are now very anxious to pursue more aggressive career opportunities! You would really be surprised as to how many HR professionals are very open to a mother returning to the work force!

Hope this helps:-)
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Old 01-15-2008, 08:00 PM
 
229 posts, read 556,304 times
Reputation: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
a) Your former employer will not contact your potential employer. The other way around.
b) You can list that job. Why not? Explain that you left your employment due to a change in climate; try to be very professional and detached about it when you talk about your manager's change in lifestyle and social skills. Normally applications have a "contact former employer" option.
c) 99.9% of all jobs will show up on an employer run credit check. Explain skeletons before they make an unannounced appearance.
d) You can sum up part-time jobs or those with no relevance to your current professional life under "various part-time from x to z" and be ready to go over them if necessary.
99.9 percent of all jobs appear on one's credit check? That is news to me !!
Last time I checked my credit report, I didn't see any of my past nor my present jobs there.

The "contact former employer" option really means nothing. Many will contact them anyway. That has happen to me a few times in the past.

Having a questionable supervisor is really a catch-22 when applying for another job. Sure one can write down the name of another co-worker to contact for a reference but the supervisor in question can complain that his duties are taken away from him by doing so. Mentioning the reason why one should not contact the supervisor, that can raise red flags. Even telling the truth like "..well he has emotional problems..perhaps bipolar disorder". Well if that got back to the supervisor, he/she could very well sue even if they really do have say Bipolar disorder. That I believe falls until the medical privacy act

Yet by taken a chance on putting down that job and the supervisor's name. The supervisor may give a little more in terms of details other than just the dates of your employment. His or her actions could cost you that job.

Either way its not a good situation to be in.
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Old 01-16-2008, 10:18 AM
 
2,278 posts, read 4,245,387 times
Reputation: 1442
Quote:
Originally Posted by arussell View Post
It all depend on the job you're going for. If the job is doing a complete background search for the last 10 years and you worked those jobs on the books, than you must list them. If they were paid off the books, the answer is no. However, you must have information for the work gaps in emploment and be able to justify why you were not employed.
Most companies require an official application be filled out for those they are considering hiring. That's when they give you the background check authorization form. So putting all former jobs on a resume is not as critical as putting them all down on the application. A resume is to get you the attention of the hiring manager and to give a relevant knowledge, skills and abilities. So putting down that 2 month hot dog stand job that has no relevance is not required for the resume, but would be for the application.
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