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Old 03-07-2017, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Big Apple
386 posts, read 208,304 times
Reputation: 509

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Just a debate, because I can see the pros and cons of both. How has telling or not telling worked out for you?

For me personally, I always tell them how much I make, only because I know I am being paid on the higher end of the range so I'd rather be upfront and honest in the beginning in order to not waste anybody's time. Companies have budgets for roles and it doesn't make sense to me if I am already passed their "high cap". But I never tell them what I am expecting - always said "I am open" so it leaves room for negotiating if there is an offer on the table.
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Old 03-07-2017, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,275 posts, read 1,150,257 times
Reputation: 5344
What I make is none of their business. I'll tell them what I want to be making, and if that's in their budget, great! If not, they can't afford me, oh well.

If you tell them what you're making now, you've just set a hard ceiling on yourself. People are seen to be worth what they're making. If you say, "I'm making $50K", you're a $50K guy. Why would they pay $75K? If you say, "I'm looking at opportunities in the $75K and up area", they may very well decide you're a $75K guy.

There is zero benefit to you in revealing your current salary. Don't do it.
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Old 03-07-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,152 posts, read 11,754,604 times
Reputation: 32127
I guess if it's a lateral move it matters a little less, but if you are going for a promotion, what you make now is for a different set of skills and responsibilities than you'd make at the new job, so you should be compensated for that, not for what you currently do.

Unfortunately, a lot of larger companies have an online job application where you may not have any option but to list past and current salary and leaving something blank means you can't get through the application process.
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Old 03-07-2017, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,275 posts, read 1,150,257 times
Reputation: 5344
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Unfortunately, a lot of larger companies have an online job application where you may not have any option but to list past and current salary and leaving something blank means you can't get through the application process.
So put what you want to make. Let them start their negotiations there. And if they decide that what you're looking for is too much and don't call you back, how are you any worse off?
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Old 03-07-2017, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,152 posts, read 11,754,604 times
Reputation: 32127
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnojr View Post
So put what you want to make. Let them start their negotiations there. And if they decide that what you're looking for is too much and don't call you back, how are you any worse off?
Because generally speaking, when you complete an employment application, that includes being asked to attest that you have completed the application in a truthful manner. When you are asked your current salary, putting what you want to make rather than what you actually make is not a truthful answer.
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Old 03-07-2017, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Big Apple
386 posts, read 208,304 times
Reputation: 509
I guess if you are currently being paid below market, you would be hesitant give out your current salary and I understand that. But if you're already being paid competitively/on the high end, sometimes it's best just to be honest in the beginning because companies want to know if they can actually offer something that makes sense. (For lateral moves)
If you're switching to a promotion, you definitely should be aiming as high as possible.
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Old 03-07-2017, 02:54 PM
 
Location: SC
8,791 posts, read 5,647,974 times
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My personal finances, other than what I am negotiating for the current job with the hiring manager are nobodies business. That is the answer they will get if they ask.
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,275 posts, read 1,150,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Because generally speaking, when you complete an employment application, that includes being asked to attest that you have completed the application in a truthful manner. When you are asked your current salary, putting what you want to make rather than what you actually make is not a truthful answer.
OK, then reveal your salary and take the hit. Not much else to say.
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Old 03-08-2017, 10:25 AM
 
313 posts, read 287,987 times
Reputation: 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnojr View Post
OK, then reveal your salary and take the hit. Not much else to say.
jnojr, I get your point and think it's valid. However, I have had several employers ask for a paystub or tax document to show current employment after I checked the box "No, please do not contact my current employer." If the figure you reported as your current salary doesn't line up with what documents you provided, they could rescind the offer.

Then again, in the corporate world these days, it seems like the 100% truthful folks get shafted left and right.
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Old 03-08-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,275 posts, read 1,150,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncsuengineer256 View Post
jnojr, I get your point and think it's valid. However, I have had several employers ask for a paystub or tax document to show current employment after I checked the box "No, please do not contact my current employer." If the figure you reported as your current salary doesn't line up with what documents you provided, they could rescind the offer.
I never provide pay stubs or tax documents. Never. I straight-up tell them, "That isn't going to happen. Not unless you show me the salaries for everyone currently doing the job or recently departed from it." If they don't want to consider me any more, fine... that's a bullet dodged.
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