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Unread 06-28-2010, 10:20 PM
 
18,903 posts, read 12,209,856 times
Reputation: 8375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_CD View Post
What do you mean?
I provide 3 levels of people for my clients:

Project Leaders (US Workforce working locally) - These individuals are assigned to multiple project within the same client, or maybe even across multiple clients depending on workload. They manage the business side of things and integration of teams locally.

Project Managers (US Workforce working for my offices offshore) - These individuals are are assigned to one or two projects depending on workload. There may be multiple project managers on a single project. They manage day to day activity offshore.

Developers (Offshore workforce contracted out through other agencies) - The developers do not work for my company. They belong to local shops (Ci&t in Brazil, HCL and Wipro in India). Depending on the size of the project, my project managers will manage small or large teams of these developers offshore.

All my offshore projects are done on an SOW. I do not provide contingent staffing through offshore resources.
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Unread 06-28-2010, 10:21 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,397 posts, read 12,613,183 times
Reputation: 5249
No opensource love here? Personally I avoided all these biz related technologies and instead learned open source. While not extremely lucrative... I am making more than those 40k salaries doing my own work...I can also use the vast open source community to my advantage to quickly implement stuff and get help if I am stuck. Generally I use php/perl/mysql but know front end web dev as well... I am actually going back to school for something completely different, but this gets me by for now during the transition. I grew to HATE I.T. ...

So it really depends on what you want to do... they tried to offer to teach me .net 2.0 c# stuff at my last job but avoided it as I knew I would never use it for myself. Using SQL Server helped though for MySQL... all SQL based DB are pretty similar.

Some one mentioned ruby on rails, wow... can't say how much I dislike that... it is great for a pure development standpoint, but administration of it (it uses separate web server) and overall trying to get things done outside the box, I have found it not very flexible.
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Unread 06-29-2010, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Midwest
179 posts, read 255,466 times
Reputation: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_CD View Post
Leave IT, the wages are dropping and the hours are increasing.
I would have to disagree, at least in terms of IT careers on the east coast... A number of my peers and myself received IT-related jobs after graduating from a public university and I have not heard of a job offer lower than 57k. (Many of us received offers in the 60s and 70s.) Some people work long hours; however, it is rare for this to be a weekly occurance. If you are concerned about your work/life balance, pursue a career where you require a clearance... Many gov't contractors are not permitted to work over 40 hours a week.
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Unread 02-23-2011, 03:09 PM
 
131 posts, read 114,763 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by RowingMunkeyCU View Post
So after graduating college and working for a company at $38k annually for 2 years using dead languages (FoxPro and COBOL) with mostly break-fix type 'development' running quick and dirty SQL queries for one-time data pulls, I'm in the process of searching for a new position.

Currently, I'm in salary negotiations for a VB.NET dev position with an ERP solution provider for about $41k annually. I'm not in a particularly high-tech area*, nor do I have the experience necessary to really demand much more.

But anyway, in your opinion, would a VB.NET position at a lower salary for 2-3 years be a good option for heading towards more lucrative positions in the future? Or would you pass on the position and keep searching?

What would order would you rank specific skills in terms of their value? (ie - C#, VB.NET, ASP.NET, Java, C/C++, Oracle PL/SQL, etc.)

Additionally, how would you work on adding other skills not able to be practiced professionally, that would be seen as experience by other employers? (ie, if I currently work for company ABC and program in c++, and I want to be able to apply to positions that use C# at company XYZ, how can I gain experience while working for company ABC?)

Thanks!

*I'm also not in a position to make a move to a high-tech area with $40k in student loans, a girlfriend finishing cosmetology school who has a 5yo son and about $33k in student loans of her own (from her BA in business marketing and the cosmetology school) and with her mom with some major health issues.
I know this is an older thread but, this is my take on how dev technologies are used in IT from my 15 years experience in the industry (in the north east):

For side work/short term contracting/gigs (ordered by demand in ascending order):
1. Android OS (Java/XML based)
2. iPhone (objective C)
3. LAMP (Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP) w/Ruby
4. .NET (Visual Studio, vb.net/C#) w/SQL server
5. Java/Tomcat based projects - which now require MVC/framework knowledge (i.e., Struts, etc.) w/3rd part Javascript libraries (i.e., JQuery, Dojo)

For full time employment at a mid/large company:
1. J2EE/Oracle(w/PL/SQL)...no comparison for enterprise wide apps
2. C++ for COTS products for re-sale.
3. .NET (in my opinion, not a suitable technology at all for enterprise quality apps).

For any web based job, knowledge of the following languages are assumed:
1. (X)HTML
2. Javascript
3. XML

There are a lot of other technologies out there that may be requested by a future employer (i.e., Wickets, Python, etc.) but chances are, they are not being used at all within their workplace. After six years at my current place of employment, I still haven't used half of the technologies they "required" knowledge of.
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Unread 02-23-2011, 03:36 PM
 
585 posts, read 395,892 times
Reputation: 451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacci Balls View Post
I know this is an older thread but, this is my take on how dev technologies are used in IT from my 15 years experience in the industry (in the north east):

For side work/short term contracting/gigs (ordered by demand in ascending order):
1. Android OS (Java/XML based)
2. iPhone (objective C)
3. LAMP (Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP) w/Ruby
4. .NET (Visual Studio, vb.net/C#) w/SQL server
5. Java/Tomcat based projects - which now require MVC/framework knowledge (i.e., Struts, etc.) w/3rd part Javascript libraries (i.e., JQuery, Dojo)

For full time employment at a mid/large company:
1. J2EE/Oracle(w/PL/SQL)...no comparison for enterprise wide apps
2. C++ for COTS products for re-sale.
3. .NET (in my opinion, not a suitable technology at all for enterprise quality apps).

For any web based job, knowledge of the following languages are assumed:
1. (X)HTML
2. Javascript
3. XML

There are a lot of other technologies out there that may be requested by a future employer (i.e., Wickets, Python, etc.) but chances are, they are not being used at all within their workplace. After six years at my current place of employment, I still haven't used half of the technologies they "required" knowledge of.
Only thing I want to add to this is that we do actually use Python every day, it's one of our major programming languages right next to Java and C++.
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Unread 02-24-2011, 08:06 AM
 
131 posts, read 114,763 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdJS View Post
Only thing I want to add to this is that we do actually use Python every day, it's one of our major programming languages right next to Java and C++.
Cool....I never had the opportunity to learn Python as of yet.

If I had to guess, do you work for a smaller company (under 10 employees)?

Also, since I am not overly familiar with Python, is there anything this language can do that a combination of Java IO and a shell script can not?
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