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Old 03-19-2008, 10:44 AM
 
454 posts, read 915,925 times
Reputation: 372
Question Boss asked if I was searching for another job

So in my weekly 1-on-1 with my boss, I was asked if I was looking for another job. Currently, I am, and have a verbal offer and have to go in next week to finalize everything.

What would you say? I more or less attempted to dodge the question a bit, saying I always keep my eye out to see what interesting internal positions might become available.

Also, how do you go about drafting a resignation letter (this is my first corporate job)?
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Old 03-19-2008, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,060 posts, read 17,423,202 times
Reputation: 2832
Quote:
Originally Posted by RowingMunkeyCU View Post
So in my weekly 1-on-1 with my boss, I was asked if I was looking for another job. Currently, I am, and have a verbal offer and have to go in next week to finalize everything.

What would you say? I more or less attempted to dodge the question a bit, saying I always keep my eye out to see what interesting internal positions might become available.

Also, how do you go about drafting a resignation letter (this is my first corporate job)?
Don't say a word without a signed offer letter. Dodge the question as best you can, i.e. "I'm not actively looking but from time to time I have been contated about other opportunities".

As for a resignation letter, keep it short and sweet: Indicate your resignation, the last day you will be on the job, and thank them for the opportunity. Remember it' s a decision, not a discussion.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:10 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 13,091,250 times
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SAY NOTHING!
Don't try to be cagey until you have that new job and you like it.
My brother in law just got fired after 'admitting' he was looking around for something new.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
79 posts, read 307,015 times
Reputation: 41
This is not necessarily a bad situation once you've got a sign resignation letter. Not the exact same scenario, but from my experience when I’ve given my resignation notice my managers have always tried to retain me and if you are a good employee and your skills are valued, this will likely happen to you. Coincidently, this has always been the time that my boss has been the most candid with me and willing to open up and talk to me on a personal level. This is the time when you find out how much you are truly appreciated or what your boss really likes most about you. Take mental notes because this is where you discover your hidden strengths / weaknesses and this knowledge will help you in your next interview or job.

Anyhow, this is an opportunity for you to discuss some of your concerns or frustrations, but do this tactfully. In the end in an attempt to retain you, what usually happens is you’ll be offered a raise, a transfer to another department or division, a promotion, more (or less) responsibilities, etc. This is the best time to practice your negotiation skills. At the very least you’ll get your bosses attention and maybe he/she can learn from some of the issues you brought up and adjust their management skills.

If you still want to accept the other job once you've had this conversation, then you can turn in a formal resignation letter. Your resignation letter doesn’t need to be long. In it, you don’t need to explain why you’re leaving or that you’ve enjoyed working there etc. All it has to say is that as of such and such date you are formally resigning your position. And thank them for the opportunity.
Google resignation letters for some quick and dirty examples.
Hope this helps.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Rolando, San Diego CA 92115
7,060 posts, read 17,423,202 times
Reputation: 2832
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrlucero2002 View Post
In the end in an attempt to retain you, what usually happens is you’ll be offered a raise, a transfer to another department or division, a promotion, more (or less) responsibilities, etc. This is the best time to practice your negotiation skills. At the very least you’ll get your bosses attention and maybe he/she can learn from some of the issues you brought up and adjust their management skills.
Generally speaking, I feel that counteroffers should never be accepted and really never be entertained. Counteroffers open up a host of issues: why is the employer only offering you a raise after you've indicated you are leaving? Also, since you've just told the boss you are leaving, your loyalty is now questionable.

The reality is that most people who accept counteroffers are gone in 6 months. Most managers who make counteroffers are just doing so to avoid being in a lurch and will immediately seek your replacement.

The time to ask for a raise or negotiate is during the offer phase or on the job, not after you have already found another job.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,024 posts, read 5,314,819 times
Reputation: 4193
I think I would have answered that with something like "No, no more than any one else here. I would be a fool not to listen if someone were to come to me with an opportunity. But, why do you ask?"

It could be that you were less than discrete or that the company that is making the offer has contacted them for a reference already and you will need to have a story ready to explain why you filled out an application for them.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
79 posts, read 307,015 times
Reputation: 41
I have to agree with Sassberto. Having gone through the counter offer process a few times, I've never accepted. But I did learn a lot from my discussion with my former employers. Johnrex's answer to your boss's question is awesome.
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Old 03-19-2008, 11:40 AM
 
2,011 posts, read 3,106,902 times
Reputation: 1720
Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsySoul22 View Post
SAY NOTHING!
Don't try to be cagey until you have that new job and you like it.
My brother in law just got fired after 'admitting' he was looking around for something new.
Very true. Once an employer gets the "inkling" that you're looking for another job, is becomes a QUEST to see how fast they can fire you versus you quitting; this has to do with ego and the competitive nature of some people and of course the employer's need to be the one that is in control of the hiring and firing. This is some sort of primal thing, I believe, no kidding. Some must be the ones to win, meaning they fire you first, not the other way around. On the other hand, back to the original poster, I question the signals that were being sent out for the employer to even ask such a question. You really have to watch what's going around you and stay in control until an firm offer elsewhere is at hand, (if one wants to stay employed, that is).

Sorry to hear about your BIL.
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Old 03-19-2008, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,851 posts, read 51,212,921 times
Reputation: 22714
Quote:
Originally Posted by RowingMunkeyCU View Post
So in my weekly 1-on-1 with my boss, I was asked if I was looking for another job. Currently, I am, and have a verbal offer and have to go in next week to finalize everything.

What would you say? I more or less attempted to dodge the question a bit, saying I always keep my eye out to see what interesting internal positions might become available.

Also, how do you go about drafting a resignation letter (this is my first corporate job)?
I'm curious to know how he found out...
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Old 03-19-2008, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
15,118 posts, read 23,866,730 times
Reputation: 12196
Turn the question around. If you don't like the question he asked, then you need to answer him/her with another question such as "Why would you ask me a question like that?" Then he/she has to answer your question. Then, you just keep answering his/her questions with questions of your own.
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