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Old 02-20-2018, 07:20 PM
 
6,855 posts, read 10,739,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left-handed View Post

Do you want to move up and make more money?
I do not. I'm already at management level.

Why do you even bother responding to my posts if you don't even read them.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:25 PM
 
2,244 posts, read 793,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
I do not. I'm already at management level.

Why do you even bother responding to my posts if you don't even read them.
Because I'm responding to two completely different posts, both with completely different meanings and points. Your 2nd response has a much different connotation than your first.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:26 PM
 
6,855 posts, read 10,739,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left-handed View Post
Well, it sounds to me the only person who is preventing you from that is yourself. You're an engineer, for crying out loud. Many of your peers your age are running departments, divisions, or entire companies.
Again, jumping from being a corporate manager to another corporate manager is not a career change.

You're skill is managing people and maximizing profits for your employer. You're just transferring it over.

If you wanna be a CEO, and make a lot of $, great. Good luck to you. I'll leave it at that.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:29 PM
 
2,244 posts, read 793,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Again, jumping from being a corporate manager to another corporate manager is not a career change.

You're skill is managing people. You're just transferring it over.

If you wanna be a CEO, and make a lot of $, great. Good luck to you. I'll leave it at that.
I do not want to be a CEO. I also don't care that much about the money. But in response to your first post in this thread, it seemed that your initial message was that other companies won't allow you to make a career change after 33. That's ridiculous, as there is plenty of evidence to the contrary.

There are also a lot of techies who leave or forego altogether the private sector to take jobs at non profits or in education. But like you said, most of them aren't afraid to take that pay cut to do so.
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:35 PM
 
6,855 posts, read 10,739,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left-handed View Post

There are also a lot of techies who leave or forego altogether the private sector to take jobs at non profits or in education. But like you said, most of them aren't afraid to take that pay cut to do so.
Again, to my original point.

Switching from software engineering to becoming a middle school teacher would be a difficult journey (though not as rough as most, because more people switch into teaching than most other careers). Moving into public policy or grant writing for instance would be a very difficult journey.

Nobody cares about your soft skills. How much actual tangible work can you do for your employer in 40 hours?
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Old 02-20-2018, 07:41 PM
 
2,244 posts, read 793,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Again, to my original point.

Switching from software engineering to becoming a middle school teacher would be a difficult journey (though not as rough as most, because more people switch into teaching than most other careers). Moving into public policy or grant writing for instance would be a very difficult journey.

Nobody cares about your soft skills. How much actual tangible work can you do for your employer in 40 hours?
It's funny you mention soft skills, because that's about 95% of what public policy is. Wheeling and dealing and selling ideas. Maybe you're exceptionally extroverted or talented in dealing with people.

Grant writing might rely more on technical writing skills, but again, maybe you're exceptionally good at writing and the grants you're writing for pertain to something highly technical that you've been involved with in your past tech career.

All in all, it boils down to transferable skills. And sometimes past expertise, while not entirely related to the new endeavor, may end up being useful in one way or another.

Difficult? Sure. I'll give you that. But aren't most things that are worth having?

Quote:
Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty… I have never in my life envied a human being who led an easy life. I have envied a great many people who led difficult lives and led them well. - Theordore Roosevelt
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Old 02-20-2018, 09:56 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,319 posts, read 2,582,582 times
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Only experience I have is observing and asking coworkers. One coworker had a degree in journalism, but ended up getting a Masters in Computer Science. She did work hard to learn the ins and outs of Java, and software programming. The job paid her to get her Sun Certified Java Programmer cert. Another older guy was a chemical engineer (or was it electric eng.?), but ended up being a database admin. IIRC, he was self taught as well.
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Old 02-23-2018, 04:05 PM
 
315 posts, read 207,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Returning2USA View Post
Is it OK to ask for more details on your situation?

I you changing industries completely?

Do you have a vision of what new job / career you want to do?


This is a very relevant thread for many people (including me as part of my job was outsourced last year and i'm in my late 40s).
OP here. I've worked in a variety of industries, transferring my administrative/executive skills, project management skills, book keeping, customer service, graphic design to many of them. I transferred these skills into working the mortgage industry, property management, and as a medical secretary. I'm trying to escape the executive/admin rut.

I've always worked a part-time job, on top of my full time day job out of boredom. This is how I was able to pursue my music passion into a business and really fun side gigs. Working in the music scene was a blast, but after several years, I burnt out.

I have not yet found another passion. I've been piddling around with a new career in IT, learning Linux and WordPress on my own, trying to find my interest. Just not sure how to find a new job that doesn't involve being an Office manager or exec/admin assistant.
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Old 02-23-2018, 08:31 PM
 
1,233 posts, read 3,587,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Left-handed View Post
I don't really agree with this at all. In the world that I live in, people are jumping jobs and switching careers/industries quite regularly. One of the benefits of job hopping is that you're not tied to one specific role or industry that you've been stagnating in for 10-15 years. That's old school rules. The youngins have caught on to this foolishness and they've flipped the old standards on their head.
Maybe people are 'switching jobs' quite regularly but not careers and certainly not older workers (as a previous poster said 'that age' now is early - mid 30s)..
"the youngins' are getting the majority of new high paying jobs (especially in cities like NYC, Boston & San Francisco). The workforce as a whole has gotten significantly younger on average since 2010 due to the massive number of baby boomers either retiring or whom have 'left the workforce'
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Old 02-23-2018, 08:34 PM
 
1,233 posts, read 3,587,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
So as a corporate number crunching analyst, you can change careers and get a 40% pay raise?

That's great.

In my world (engineering), if you don't have the DIRECT, RELEVANT experience and they have to train you, it's a tough sell to get even an interview to take a 40% paycut.

Again, I've been through it...
Yes, since those 'career experts' who write columns for CNBC, Marketwatch & Yahoo Finance say it is true and they are always writing the 'sunshine & lollipops' articles and reiterating how the job market is the best in modern history the IT MUST BE TRUE right?
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