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Old 02-25-2018, 03:44 AM
 
8 posts, read 3,436 times
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So I have always tried to do the right thing or most logical thing. I graduated college and started whatever job I can get right away. Pay down my loans before I decide to go into more debt and schooling. Parents was upset with me because I am taking my time and they wanted me to get Going with a career. However I didnít know what I wanted to do.... and I still donít. Really. So I payed off all of my debt and have some saved up money. I feel less anxiety about my finances than before. Been having an idea about being a dentist, but the debt scares me and personal stories of my own distant cousin too. Distant cousin is a dentist and has a dental practice. Sounds nice and dandy, but she is struggling. Tons of dental debt which is probably 400k and a dental practice. She is early 40s and has to ask her parents for financial help. I donít think I can get into a cheap instate school since it is really competitive and military scholarship too is hard to get. Need really high gpa which I donít have. The work seems like something I can do, autonomy, being my own bosss, setting my own hours is appealing, and lucrative job but dentistry today isnít like what it was back then.

I have been thinking about nursing to np. Low debt, great demand, lots of jobs, decent return on my investment. Job can suck ass and is hard. It just seems like a good career option. Working 3 days a week sounds real nice and pick days I want to work. Also to become a np sounds like great career wise. So here I am thinking about what the right thing to do is. I begin to think that doing what you love is a fallacy. Work can sucks, that is why they call it work right? I do have an empathetic vibe and care for patients which is why I am leaning towards serving others. In nursing, I can pay off all my loans quickly and have the freedom to do other things that I actually enjoy and not be shackled by debt. With lots of debt you are forced to do it no matter what. What would you do or recommend?
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:08 AM
 
618 posts, read 214,112 times
Reputation: 1508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatislife9814 View Post
So I have always tried to do the right thing or most logical thing. I graduated college and started whatever job I can get right away. Pay down my loans before I decide to go into more debt and schooling. Parents was upset with me because I am taking my time and they wanted me to get Going with a career. However I didnít know what I wanted to do.... and I still donít. Really. So I payed off all of my debt and have some saved up money. I feel less anxiety about my finances than before. Been having an idea about being a dentist, but the debt scares me and personal stories of my own distant cousin too. Distant cousin is a dentist and has a dental practice. Sounds nice and dandy, but she is struggling. Tons of dental debt which is probably 400k and a dental practice. She is early 40s and has to ask her parents for financial help. I donít think I can get into a cheap instate school since it is really competitive and military scholarship too is hard to get. Need really high gpa which I donít have. The work seems like something I can do, autonomy, being my own bosss, setting my own hours is appealing, and lucrative job but dentistry today isnít like what it was back then.

I have been thinking about nursing to np. Low debt, great demand, lots of jobs, decent return on my investment. Job can suck ass and is hard. It just seems like a good career option. Working 3 days a week sounds real nice and pick days I want to work. Also to become a np sounds like great career wise. So here I am thinking about what the right thing to do is. I begin to think that doing what you love is a fallacy. Work can sucks, that is why they call it work right? I do have an empathetic vibe and care for patients which is why I am leaning towards serving others. In nursing, I can pay off all my loans quickly and have the freedom to do other things that I actually enjoy and not be shackled by debt. With lots of debt you are forced to do it no matter what. What would you do or recommend?
I have heard some unpleasant stories from many nurses about their careers, and the supposed "nursing shortage". I would strongly recommend you doing more research about nursing. Talk to real working nurses and don't just listen to the hype about this career. Back in 2010, my wife was in the hospital for about 6 months. In visiting her almost every day, I talked to a lot of nurses. I had always assumed that nurses "had it made". Severe nursing shortage, very high wages, good working conditions, ability to move to any part of the country and instantly get a job. Hospitals and other medical care facilities begging older nurses not to retire but continue to work.

However, it really isn't like that. The wages are certainly not high in terms of the level of training needed for this profession and the supposed "shortage". Nurses have told me that hospitals and other health care centers like to get rid of seasoned nurses and keep replacing them with less experienced ones, paying them lower wages. That is also strange since there is a "shortage" of nurses.

So do your homework first before getting into this career.

May I ask what your job is now and how old you are? Paying off your student debt is quite an achievement, especially with a job that you dont seem impressed with.
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:23 AM
Status: "Cretins of wishful thinking, we delude ourselves" (set 18 days ago)
 
845 posts, read 396,549 times
Reputation: 2572
Allnurses.com forums --->
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:35 AM
 
2,020 posts, read 786,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
I have heard some unpleasant stories from many nurses about their careers, and the supposed "nursing shortage". I would strongly recommend you doing more research about nursing. Talk to real working nurses and don't just listen to the hype about this career. Back in 2010, my wife was in the hospital for about 6 months. In visiting her almost every day, I talked to a lot of nurses. I had always assumed that nurses "had it made". Severe nursing shortage, very high wages, good working conditions, ability to move to any part of the country and instantly get a job. Hospitals and other medical care facilities begging older nurses not to retire but continue to work.

However, it really isn't like that. The wages are certainly not high in terms of the level of training needed for this profession and the supposed "shortage". Nurses have told me that hospitals and other health care centers like to get rid of seasoned nurses and keep replacing them with less experienced ones, paying them lower wages. That is also strange since there is a "shortage" of nurses.

So do your homework first before getting into this career.

May I ask what your job is now and how old you are? Paying off your student debt is quite an achievement, especially with a job that you dont seem impressed with.
There absolutely is a shortage, but what isnít discussed as much is where the shortage is and what types of jobs they entail. Many of the larger city hospitals are upgrading their requirements for nurses to have a BSN, which has pushed a lot of the more experienced nurses who just have an associateís degree out. They can do that because there is a lot of demand for those positions.

However, there is a HUGE demand for skilled nursing in nursing homes or in private homes. The pay for these positions is extremely low and also extremely physically challenging. Typically the shortage tends to be in more rural locations. No one wants to do a job where they bill one client for 2 hours and then have to drive to another clientís house for 4 hours and then a third clientís house for another 2 hours. In particular, some of this level of nursing tends to be billed at the LPN level and then the RN level is only at very low quantities just for supervision, which means even fewer contact hours and more driving. (I worked for a state agency that has a nursing service and it was well known that there was a shortage in this area.)
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:52 AM
 
417 posts, read 151,322 times
Reputation: 657
What degree did you graduate with?

Personally I like sticking with cushy office jobs and not deal with patients. If I had to do it over again, get a CPA and work my way to controller position.
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Old 02-25-2018, 07:27 AM
 
8,590 posts, read 2,971,779 times
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the healthcare shortage/split is odd, stemming from the 1990s really

take nursing for example, go to almost any hospital and you see a lot of older nurses over 50 or a lot under 30. there aren't many in between. this is the so called shortage from the 1990s, there is around a 10-20 year gap in ages between workers. starting from early 2000s when nursing was pushed for, it took until now before the schools could be built and turn out nurses.

the shortage is in the 30-50 age range where they should have one-two decades of experience in the field already but there were not many nurses at that age range. when the 50-60 aged nurses retire the gap will be hard to fill because the current nurses have not the experiences to be nursing managers and supervisors.

it's becoming a tiered system, a Bsn nurse oversees a few Lpn rn who watches a few cnas since they don't have the experience to be entirely autonomous like the older nurses today who can go between different roles to fill in

rest of the healthcare field is like this, and worldwide too, starting to see the old "travel" contracts turning international

at least in a decade, healthcare will become a commodity job and be easier to get working visas everywhere

Last edited by MLSFan; 02-25-2018 at 07:36 AM..
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Old 02-25-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
25,945 posts, read 26,650,881 times
Reputation: 24514
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonaldJTrump View Post
What degree did you graduate with?

Personally I like sticking with cushy office jobs and not deal with patients. If I had to do it over again, get a CPA and work my way to controller position.
I did a use,ess degree, found a niche and now I am well paid and at the end of the day my job js not that hard. I have a cushy office job at a mid-senior level.

I don't need my job to be my impact in the world. I just want to be intellectually stimulated while I am there and make enough money to pay bills. I mostly leave work at work, but one of the challenges in being in a job that is intellectual is that you'll end up with work thoughts on the off hours sometimes. I work maybe 45 hours a week, mostly weekdays only. Ocasionally I'll do a few hours of work on the weekend or in the evenings. But not too often.

I still have some student loan debt, but it is my own fault for not prioritizing paying it off. It isn't crushing or anything.

There are a lot of ways to get well paying jobs by working your way up. That's what I did, no advanced degree required. Find a valuable skill. Become a specialist. Keep going.
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Old 02-25-2018, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
18,708 posts, read 13,384,687 times
Reputation: 20706
You have to take care of yourself and your family's needs first and foremost. After that, I try to do good.
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:01 PM
 
254 posts, read 63,426 times
Reputation: 377
I have not heard good things about Nursing. And similarly most of my experiences with Nurses are not that great either. The field attracts the wrong type these days. People with no critical thinking skills that can barely take blood pressure correctly (they never put my arm at heart level and rely on the machine too much)
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Old 02-25-2018, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Asia
261 posts, read 117,889 times
Reputation: 264
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatislife9814 View Post
So I have always tried to do the right thing or most logical thing. I graduated college and started whatever job I can get right away. Pay down my loans before I decide to go into more debt and schooling. Parents was upset with me because I am taking my time and they wanted me to get Going with a career. However I didn’t know what I wanted to do.... and I still don’t. Really. So I payed off all of my debt and have some saved up money. I feel less anxiety about my finances than before. Been having an idea about being a dentist, but the debt scares me and personal stories of my own distant cousin too. Distant cousin is a dentist and has a dental practice. Sounds nice and dandy, but she is struggling. Tons of dental debt which is probably 400k and a dental practice. She is early 40s and has to ask her parents for financial help. I don’t think I can get into a cheap instate school since it is really competitive and military scholarship too is hard to get. Need really high gpa which I don’t have. The work seems like something I can do, autonomy, being my own bosss, setting my own hours is appealing, and lucrative job but dentistry today isn’t like what it was back then.
This would dissuade me from going to Dental school (also).

Quote:
I have been thinking about nursing to np. Low debt, great demand, lots of jobs, decent return on my investment. Job can suck ass and is hard. It just seems like a good career option. Working 3 days a week sounds real nice and pick days I want to work. Also to become a np sounds like great career wise. So here I am thinking about what the right thing to do is. I begin to think that doing what you love is a fallacy. Work can sucks, that is why they call it work right? I do have an empathetic vibe and care for patients which is why I am leaning towards serving others. In nursing, I can pay off all my loans quickly and have the freedom to do other things that I actually enjoy and not be shackled by debt. With lots of debt you are forced to do it no matter what. What would you do or recommend?
Seems like nursing is in high demand.

Seems like you can work anywhere in the US and even in many parts of the world.

Job security.

To answer your last sentence in bold.

Only you can decide on nursing. Only you.

Are you just curious about nursing or are interested in the actual field and practice?

It depends on how much you are attracted to the actual job & life.

I agree with you on debt. Debt is a ball and chain and many of the younger generation will be debt slaves for life *before* they even get their first steady job.

Good luck and keep us posted.
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