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Old 03-25-2008, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Grafton, Ohio
286 posts, read 1,138,776 times
Reputation: 146
Default How to word a cover letter...?

When you're relocating to an area for your spouse's job transfer?

I pretty much have to try getting a new job. I would transfer with my existing employer, but there are no jobs I'm interested in / trained for in the new area. It is on the other side of the state, so commuting to my current job is a no go. We're moving specifically for my husband's job at this moment, but ultimately plan to start a business with my in laws... And, too boot, only been in my current location less than a year (moved here from out of state), and I have less than 8mths in my current position. Talk about the cards stacked against me...
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:35 PM
 
2,243 posts, read 2,593,890 times
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Please don't have such a negative outlook. Be honest on your cover letter. Any employer with common sense will understand that everyone's life isn't perfectly put together; people move and things happen. Be optimistic, list your skills that could benefit whatever company you choose to apply to, and wait. That's really all any of us can do!
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:59 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
357 posts, read 597,563 times
Reputation: 93
As sirron mentioned, honesty is the best policy. That doesn't mean you can't show enthusiasm towards or interest in a company/position, but you should also make it clear that you are leaving your current position because of the move. I've actually got some great guides that you should check out - two from Miami U and one from Virginia Tech. These are great resources with samples and clear advice that should help you put together a killer cover letter (and I'm also throwing one in on resume prep, for good measure).

Miami Guide to Cover Letter Prep (.pdf)
VT Guide to Cover Letter Prep (.html)
Miami Guide to Resume Prep (.pdf)

Good luck on the job search and the move, bubbagirl. I think you'll find that life outside of Grafton has its perks, though :-)
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Old 03-20-2011, 08:59 AM
 
4,806 posts, read 11,606,986 times
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Spouses should not be mentioned in cover letters, and neither should in-laws. Nor should mention of plans to leave the job you are applying for. So just say you're moving, period. In the concluding paragraph of your letter provide the date range that you will be available for interviews and the date you will be available to start work. If you want to explain more, you can do so in an interview or after you are hired.

You might consider just leaving the last eight months off and say you weren't working. It won't look horrible given the current economy and will minimize the appearance of instability on your resumes. Most employers won't consider jobs of less than a year to contribute to your experience or salary basis anyway.
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Old 03-20-2011, 01:08 PM
 
16,543 posts, read 7,033,513 times
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I don't know if I'd leave the job off (if they found out, even by you just mentioning ex employers name while newly employed, it can be grounds for termination), I also definitely would not mention spouse or in-laws. The in-laws, well who tells an employer why in the future, I'll leave you. The spouse-because employer says "If they relo him again, I'm out an employee".

the best answer will be to minimize the damage, but it is somewhat a Catch 22.
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Old 03-20-2011, 02:11 PM
 
4,806 posts, read 11,606,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtn View Post
I don't know if I'd leave the job off (if they found out, even by you just mentioning ex employers name while newly employed, it can be grounds for termination), I also definitely would not mention spouse or in-laws. The in-laws, well who tells an employer why in the future, I'll leave you. The spouse-because employer says "If they relo him again, I'm out an employee".

the best answer will be to minimize the damage, but it is somewhat a Catch 22.
You are confusing an application with a resume. On an application, you are required to disclose all prior work. It is a legal document. On the other hand, a resume is a marketing tool and you are not required to disclose every picayune detail about yourself. Just as a company's marketing literature covers only those particulars that are an asset to them and help them gain new business, an individual's resume should focus on those details that demonstrate their qualifications and help them get the job. A resume is not a legal document nor a contract.
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: McLean, VA
4,619 posts, read 3,705,904 times
Reputation: 2082
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubbagirl View Post
When you're relocating to an area for your spouse's job transfer?

I pretty much have to try getting a new job. I would transfer with my existing employer, but there are no jobs I'm interested in / trained for in the new area. It is on the other side of the state, so commuting to my current job is a no go. We're moving specifically for my husband's job at this moment, but ultimately plan to start a business with my in laws... And, too boot, only been in my current location less than a year (moved here from out of state), and I have less than 8mths in my current position. Talk about the cards stacked against me...


The purpose of a cover letter is the expand on the generic content of your resume. You use it to explain how experience and skills from your resume apply to the postion you are seeking. My resume never changes and I only add additional job experience when applicable. I let my cover letter do the talking until I get an interview. This method has never failed me in 25 years.
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Old 03-29-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Northwest side of San Antonio
3,006 posts, read 3,856,125 times
Reputation: 1546
I'd just skip putting an address on the resume (if possible...or find someone you know who will let you use their address until you move maybe?) Put your phone number (helps them not make a judgement about your current location) and continue with it. With so many people keeping cell phone numbers and moving it may not even be noticeable. If they do ask just say you have the opportunity and ability to relocate for their company.
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