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Old 03-22-2019, 05:36 AM
 
960 posts, read 549,765 times
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After the first few sentences, I immediately thought of biostats or epi. With a graduate degree in one of those disciplines, you can even branch off to other fields like data science or machine learning.



I had a similar pathway as you. BS in neuroscience but hated benchwork and wasn't capable of making it into med school. Took a few classes post-bac to explore some different possibilities (you can take grad level classes too) and found an interest in exposure science and occupational health. Went the MPH route and now I'm doing great.
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Old 03-22-2019, 07:21 AM
 
2,477 posts, read 706,691 times
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Did the OP read this thread yet? No response.
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Old 03-22-2019, 11:18 AM
 
10,071 posts, read 4,687,862 times
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Going to point out that no one brings up medical technology, has what he "thinks" he likes, medical microbiology/immunology/virology

and only needs an associate or bachelors degree, and excepted (quicker hiring) government jobs

sure, he could go the masters degree route, and what? he still doesn't actually know what the field is like nor does he know if he likes it. He hasn't actually shadowed someone in the field, other than maybe watching youtube videos about the job highlighting the best of the job and none of the bad

@bobsell, he hasn't been back, he tuned out like he did in college when people were explaining what the degrees did
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Old 03-22-2019, 01:47 PM
 
5,908 posts, read 2,031,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
Take those math/statistics skills and get into data science to make $$$$ in the meanwhile and figure out what you want to do.

Look for data science roles in healthcare or pharmaceutical companies.
This. It is a great oppty for a young person with a foundation in the life sciences.

Without a Master's degree there aren't lots of opportunities to apply what you know as a biologist. The peril with only the BS in something like general Biology is that you are locked out of the decent portions of a career track in the field and will wind up as a technician, counting salamander eggs for Fish & Wildlife or something similar. And for some people that might be great and they'd be content with that.

But for others, they find that level of work mind-numbing and tedious and not challenging and want to really contribute to the body of knowledge in a scientific discipline and I think for that you either need to add Computer/Data science to the basic science, and/or go into Research, which is going to require the MS or PhD to really contribute beyond the Technician level.

Once in a while you run across some very bright auto-didacts who have defied the odds and wind up far above the level predicted by their academic attainment, but its not all that common.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
Going to point out that no one brings up medical technology, has what he "thinks" he likes, medical microbiology/immunology/virology

and only needs an associate or bachelors degree, and excepted (quicker hiring) government jobs

sure, he could go the masters degree route, and what? he still doesn't actually know what the field is like nor does he know if he likes it. He hasn't actually shadowed someone in the field, other than maybe watching youtube videos about the job highlighting the best of the job and none of the bad

@bobsell, he hasn't been back, he tuned out like he did in college when people were explaining what the degrees did
Those are low-level technician jobs though. Anything that only needs an Associates or a BS is low-level, especially in the public sector.

I think part of the issue is that career counseling is either not available or simply terrible.

There is no real concept of career counseling in most K-12 environments and I've never seen it in the universities either.

It is possible to get all the way through an undergrad sciences major without any exposure to a mentor, to a counselor, or even to a real-world application of the degree major. Its not only possible, its the typical experience.
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Old 03-22-2019, 04:48 PM
 
10,071 posts, read 4,687,862 times
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Originally Posted by phantompilot View Post
Those are low-level technician jobs though. Anything that only needs an Associates or a BS is low-level, especially in the public sector.
Low level? Depends on what you call low I suppose... Gs 9-11 with a BS degree, And gs 7-9 for Mlt

Seems as good as the average college grad is going to get. No the career won't make you rich but it is enough. Plus I don't worry about being out of a job. Every hospital, blood center, private lab/doc office is hiring. There isn't many places that you can't go online and see openings.
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Old 03-22-2019, 04:56 PM
 
13,343 posts, read 25,596,053 times
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Consider taking state and federal civil service exams and if possible, be open to whatever geographic areas you can for work.

A friend of mine limped through a pre-med degree, didn't get into medical school (grades too low) and then didn't get into law school for the same reason. After a couple of years of waitressing, she took federal civil service exams, got a great beginning job at the FDA, and moved up through a career at the FDA in D.C. They also sent her to Johns Hopkins for an MPH and she worked in FDA communications until retirement.
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Old 03-22-2019, 07:35 PM
 
2,477 posts, read 706,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
@bobsell, he hasn't been back, he tuned out like he did in college when people were explaining what the degrees did
If I were a mod of this forum, I'd lock this thread then. Clearly the OP didn't take the question seriously.
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Old 03-22-2019, 08:11 PM
 
5,908 posts, read 2,031,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLSFan View Post
Low level? Depends on what you call low I suppose... Gs 9-11 with a BS degree, And gs 7-9 for Mlt

Seems as good as the average college grad is going to get. No the career won't make you rich but it is enough. Plus I don't worry about being out of a job. Every hospital, blood center, private lab/doc office is hiring. There isn't many places that you can't go online and see openings.
Right, low-level. Not even 70K a year at the highest step. That's terrible for a college grad.

I mean, if you're living in some low-cost midwest state it might work out...but forget the coasts or any major metro on that kind of salary - you'll be on public assistance in California.
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Old 03-22-2019, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
8,821 posts, read 13,319,130 times
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Getting a Fed job with a science degree is going to be darn near impossible. I had an MSc and extensive experience and only got close. I put 200 apps out for various related science positions. I got referred to about 5-10 and got 2 calls. ~50% were black holes, ~20% not qualified (I have no idea how I didn't apply to anything I wasn't), and the rest qualified not referred. I had opening report they had over 200 qualified applicants per position. Everyone wants to work for the fed in science because the private sector treats them horribly. The big companies near me don't even hire them only via contract/temp agencies so no benefits and awful pay some as little as $15 an hour.

My best advice to the OP is healthcare or get out of science.
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Old 03-22-2019, 09:39 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,956 posts, read 70,771,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CortezC View Post
https://www.teachforamerica.org/


Go teach for a year or two on the Navajo Reservation while you figure out what to do. You might have a greater appreciation for what you have accomplished so far.
True, they may need a biology and math teacher, somewhere on the rez. But the kids complain that the bilagaana teachers just come and go; they come for a couple of years to get started in their career, then move on to better locations, and the kids feel abandoned, like there's too much turnover.
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