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Old 03-24-2019, 10:06 PM
 
2,410 posts, read 687,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
Take those math/statistics skills and get into data science to make $$$$
There are no data science jobs that require no experience. The OP will wind up with more debt and wondering how to get a job.
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Old 03-26-2019, 12:06 AM
 
5,908 posts, read 2,019,828 times
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I should mention try to get into sales while you work on your higher Ed plans. You can make a lot of money working for a healthcare or bio/pharma firm.
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Old 03-26-2019, 02:58 PM
 
3,756 posts, read 2,121,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phantompilot View Post
I should mention try to get into sales while you work on your higher Ed plans. You can make a lot of money working for a healthcare or bio/pharma firm.

You can. But you have to be extroverted and have the “gift to gab”. It takes a certain skill set for that job. If you’re more of an introvert or being around people quickly becomes draining, sales is definitely NOT for you
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Old 03-26-2019, 07:15 PM
 
117 posts, read 39,051 times
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There's a lot you can do with you bio degree. In fact you may wind up in a career that has nothing to do with it. I have worked in business with music majors and social work majors. I have taken a number of career assessment tests. By far, the most accurate and insightful career test for me was the free CareerOneStop Interest Assessment. You can go to the BLS website and watch day in the life videos. Before you make a decision as to a career, make sure you shadow. It might be embarrassing to ask if you can shadow but it is worth it.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:35 PM
 
2,630 posts, read 1,933,869 times
Reputation: 4597
Quote:
Originally Posted by psyche_da_mike24 View Post
u wot m8

Most bio/life science majors who go down paths 1 and 2 already have an established career interest in medicine and healthcare from when they start undergrad, if not earlier. Just because you're interested in bio and life science doesn't necessarily mean this is a good career path for you.

Not trying to discourage readers from randomly deciding to go into medicine and healthcare midway through their college career btw. I just want to emphasize that the cognitive demands and work schedule of healthcare fields isn't for everyone.

From what I've heard and observed from shadowing healthcare professionals in college, there's a ton of overlap in terms of what PAs and MDs do, particularly in rural settings and in specialties with acute MD shortages. The main difference is PAs can't make certain prescriptions or diagnoses.

PA's, Hospitalists, and a host of others are new things, given increasingly more "professional" duties, never seen before. But, in the end, it's the pay. PA's earn 1/4 to 1/3 what the MD's they assist earn. Hospitalists are still paid fairly well (but they have medical degrees and do a lot of footwork - some of it high pressure stuff).

In my experience (taught med school students and PA students) there is not much difference in the sweat you put out getting there. It's getting into the program that is different. What has recently occurred is that today, it is almost as easy to get into a DO or MD program as it is to get into a PA program (of most types). So, if it fits you, go for the top. Few people actually realize the very wide scope of careers a DO or MD degree will afford you - not to mention, in the foreseeable future, an income 3 - 4X as much - doing pretty much the same thing that a PA does, but you sitting in your comfy office calling the shots. With an MD or DO degree, you can have a lucrative career never ever seeing a live patient. In the near future opportunities of that type will surely increase. Few people realize that - your preprofessional counselor likely will not bring that up.

If you are in your twenties it is important to realize that your energy levels are now peak, and you have way less outside obligations/distractions than you'll ever have for the next 40 years. For that reason, that is not a time to short yourself. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Last edited by TwinbrookNine; 04-30-2019 at 01:43 PM..
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Old 05-06-2019, 02:38 PM
 
Location: California
655 posts, read 486,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
With an MD or DO degree, you can have a lucrative career never ever seeing a live patient. In the near future opportunities of that type will surely increase.
First all physicians need to do 2 years of rotations in med school. Most of them involve working with patients and in order to pass you need to work with patients...a lot. Most subspecialties involve working with people except radiology and pathology.

Are we really going to need more pathologists and radiologists in the future? I think automation will hammer away at both professions honestly. There's already some practices outsourcing radiology readings. Sending high definition photos of abnormal cells to the lowest bidder abroad won't be too hard for pathology either.
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Old 05-07-2019, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,201 posts, read 263,093 times
Reputation: 483
STEM jobs require a phd which is usually free if you didn't totally fail school. If you just have a Bachelors look into lab temp agencies like Clinlab for grunt jobs that basically is like doing a phd. My friends brother is an epidemiologist which is a good job within the NYC government because the city has diseases from around the world.
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