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Old 03-21-2019, 07:24 AM
 
1 posts, read 233 times
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Assalam O Alykum
I have a question. If any private company give medical insurance facility to his employees. Then how many percentage can be deduct amount from employees pay. Also guide me that deduction from employees pay for medical insurance facility is legal or illegal?
Because some employees has very low salaries like 17,000/- & 20,000/- and company demand him 40 to 50% deduction from salaries.

Thanks,
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Old 03-21-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,556 posts, read 62,337,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoaib515 View Post
If any private company give medical insurance facility to his employees...
then how many percentage can be deduct amount from employees pay. ?
As much as is required to cover their portion of the insurance plan premium.

Quote:
...that deduction from employees pay for medical insurance facility is legal....?
Yes. Well, in most of the common and ordinary situations it would be.

Quote:
...some employees has very low salaries like 17,000/- & 20,000/-
and company demand him 40 to 50% deduction from salaries.
It can happen.

The next set of questions are about when/if the employee is required to join the plan,
what levels of coverage are offered/needed by them and their dependents,
and to what degree they might qualify for subsidy under the ACA or other programs.
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Old 03-21-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
12,199 posts, read 10,408,030 times
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The insurance can cost the same no matter how much you make, therefore someone making less will have a lot higher % taken out. It's not strictly a set % in any place I've ever worked.
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Old 03-21-2019, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
9,028 posts, read 8,447,613 times
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Yes, payroll deduction for the employee portion of healthcare costs is legal.

No, I do not believe that there is a cap of any type on the amount that can be taken out, and this can hit lower wage employees disproportionately.

As MrRational notes, the question to ask is whether you can opt out of the insurance plan, or choose an option with lower employee premiums.

This is just another institutionalized practice that penalizes low income people and advantages high income earners. Our economic system isn't entirely fair.
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Old 03-21-2019, 01:15 PM
 
20,668 posts, read 16,702,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoaib515 View Post
Assalam O Alykum
I have a question. If any private company give medical insurance facility to his employees. Then how many percentage can be deduct amount from employees pay. Also guide me that deduction from employees pay for medical insurance facility is legal or illegal?
Because some employees has very low salaries like 17,000/- & 20,000/- and company demand him 40 to 50% deduction from salaries.

Thanks,

The cost is what the cost is. Most companies have more than one plan, there may be one cheaper. There aren't laws about how much a company's insurance can cost. You can opt out of getting benefits through them. If you're low salary, you'd probably be better off getting a policy on the Exchange. It will most likely be cheaper, albiet with a possibly large deductible.


Most companies will increase your salary if you opt out of benefits. I have gotten at least $5.00 more an hour at jobs where I opted out of benefits. It more than covers the monthly cost of buying insurance privately.
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Old 03-21-2019, 01:31 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,895 posts, read 54,615,351 times
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Yes, there are in fact people working just for the medical and taking home little or nothing, especially spouses of self-employed business owners. You cannot get a plan in the exchange (Obamacare) if your employer offers a plan, regardless of the employer plan cost to you. The alternative if you cannot afford the employer plan is to either decline the employer plan and look for your own plan on the open market or have no health insurance. Chances are the employer plan, with group rates is a lower premium than you would pay for the same level of coverage, but you might find something cheaper with less coverage, higher deductibles.
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Old 03-21-2019, 06:47 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,255 posts, read 8,438,675 times
Reputation: 7230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Yes, there are in fact people working just for the medical and taking home little or nothing, especially spouses of self-employed business owners. You cannot get a plan in the exchange (Obamacare) if your employer offers a plan, regardless of the employer plan cost to you. The alternative if you cannot afford the employer plan is to either decline the employer plan and look for your own plan on the open market or have no health insurance. Chances are the employer plan, with group rates is a lower premium than you would pay for the same level of coverage, but you might find something cheaper with less coverage, higher deductibles.
There is an exemption if the employer premium for a "self-only" plan exceeds 9.56% of household income..

See https://www.healthcare.gov/have-job-...ketplace-plan/

"A job-based health plan is considered "affordable" if your share of the monthly premiums for the lowest-cost self-only coverage that meets the minimum value standard is less than 9.56% of your household income."
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Old 03-21-2019, 07:11 PM
 
3,423 posts, read 881,392 times
Reputation: 3935
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
There is an exemption if the employer premium for a "self-only" plan exceeds 9.56% of household income..

See https://www.healthcare.gov/have-job-...ketplace-plan/

"A job-based health plan is considered "affordable" if your share of the monthly premiums for the lowest-cost self-only coverage that meets the minimum value standard is less than 9.56% of your household income."
And I believe there's another component to this, somewhere, that states that an employer must contribute at least 50% of the PREMIUM, as well.
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