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Old 03-23-2019, 08:19 PM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
I retired from a software-related career a couple of years ago. I have an MS in computer science, and have done everything from developing test departments and methodologies to research for NASA and the DoD to managing software quality assurance departments. I retired at the age of 70, working as a SharePoint business analyst for an international bank. I had a career development plan at the time that including getting project management certification. All of this was in the private sector -- as was my second career as a clinical counselor in a mental health agency. It's not true that the private sector is for "suckers".

You're aware that the testing required in security will likely be run after hours to reduce impact on work, and that if there's a security problem or an audit it may require long hours? Some people do well in an IT environment, others can't stand it. I'd be very careful before taking off on that track and spending a lot of time and money on a new career that in the end doesn't suit you.

Not everyone is suited for every kind of job -- for example, an extreme extrovert may have a difficult time working on a job that requires long hours of solitude; a highly creative person may have a difficult time working in a position that requires a lot of repetitive and detail oriented work; and so on.

You've mentioned several possibilities in this thread -- my suggestion is: take the Self-Directed Search, which is an instrument most career counselors and coaches use with their clients. It's a preferences test: it's not about skills or potential, it's about finding the sort of positions where people with similar personalities have been found a reasonable amount of job satisfaction and happiness. You can take it here for $9.95 (USD):

Discover Your Passion | Self-Directed Search

A sample report can be viewed here:

http://www.self-directed-search.com/...port%20RIE.pdf

It will provide a list of careers that you can investigate further -- it will not give you a single magic answer. To research the careers listed in your report, you can go to the O*Net site and enter the career name (I believe the report will include links to the O*Net pages). Here for example is the O*Net page for Information Security Analysts:

https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/15-1122.00
A few comments.

- That's very impressive that you worked in private sector IT to age 70!

- The O-NET was the best career assessment site for me (most accurate).

- Thanks for reminding me that ISAs have to work outside normal hours and occasionally long hours--it is good for me to remember that.
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Old 03-23-2019, 08:22 PM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
Uh, this is easy, take the teaching job, it is the biggest blow-off job ever. I say this as someone who married a now ex-teacher. Additionally I taught part-time at a college. It is not real work. It is more frustrating than difficult.

In contrast I own (among other concerns) a boutique IT consulting firm. That is real work. There is no job security unless you work with old technologies that are in demand. Every year you will struggle to work while keeping up with the latest technologies and constantly be under the threat of being undercut by a H1B or L1V worker (unless you are contracting fro the government and have a security clearance). IT involves a lot of night and weekend work. If you love tech, that is one thing, but if you want a life outside of your work IT is not the correct career.
So having seen both sides of the fence, do you wish you chose teaching over IT?
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Old 03-23-2019, 10:58 PM
 
365 posts, read 91,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justsomeone9 View Post
So having seen both sides of the fence, do you wish you chose teaching over IT?
I have my hand in many things, I am a capitalist and this is America a land of endless opportunity. I cannot tie myself down to one activity. There is so much to do, so many things to try.

That being said, given the choice of the two I would take teaching hands down. The why is simple, with teaching you have so much free time you can do anything else that catches your fancy. IT is a great career if all you want to do is eat and drink IT. I have a couple of bitheads I employ who actually spend their free time just playing with new technologies, often ones that quickly become obsolete. They are really into all things tech, it is their life, their lifestyle, their passion and as such they are happy. Me, I like to purse divergent interests. IMO, IT is a lifestyle.
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Old 03-24-2019, 06:54 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 717,802 times
Reputation: 3980
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
Uh, this is easy, take the teaching job, it is the biggest blow-off job ever. I say this as someone who married a now ex-teacher. Additionally I taught part-time at a college. It is not real work. It is more frustrating than difficult.

In contrast I own (among other concerns) a boutique IT consulting firm. That is real work. There is no job security unless you work with old technologies that are in demand. Every year you will struggle to work while keeping up with the latest technologies and constantly be under the threat of being undercut by a H1B or L1V worker (unless you are contracting fro the government and have a security clearance). IT involves a lot of night and weekend work. If you love tech, that is one thing, but if you want a life outside of your work IT is not the correct career.
I completely agree with this advice. Teaching is not real work compared to IT. I used to be a software developer for 35 years, then retired and now have a vanity career as a substitute teacher. I see certified teachers work and that work cannot compare to the pressures, extreme challenges, deadlines, and neverending night and weekend work of the IT world. While teachers also have to put in a significant amount of hours beyond classroom time, such as doing tutoring, school events, meeting with parents, and keeping up their certifications, it is not the same as the sheer overtime and exhaustive pressure required for IT. In IT, you have to live in your job with no real time for a decent personal life.
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:10 AM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
I completely agree with this advice. Teaching is not real work compared to IT. I used to be a software developer for 35 years, then retired and now have a vanity career as a substitute teacher. I see certified teachers work and that work cannot compare to the pressures, extreme challenges, deadlines, and neverending night and weekend work of the IT world. While teachers also have to put in a significant amount of hours beyond classroom time, such as doing tutoring, school events, meeting with parents, and keeping up their certifications, it is not the same as the sheer overtime and exhaustive pressure required for IT. In IT, you have to live in your job with no real time for a decent personal life.
As a sub, for about 1 hour a day I do nothing because I have a prep time. Plus a 30 minute lunch. So I take it that if you could do it all over again, you would prefer being a teacher over being a software developer, even though you would make much less?

Last edited by Justsomeone9; 03-24-2019 at 09:21 AM..
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:13 AM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
I have my hand in many things, I am a capitalist and this is America a land of endless opportunity. I cannot tie myself down to one activity. There is so much to do, so many things to try.

That being said, given the choice of the two I would take teaching hands down. The why is simple, with teaching you have so much free time you can do anything else that catches your fancy. IT is a great career if all you want to do is eat and drink IT. I have a couple of bitheads I employ who actually spend their free time just playing with new technologies, often ones that quickly become obsolete. They are really into all things tech, it is their life, their lifestyle, their passion and as such they are happy. Me, I like to purse divergent interests. IMO, IT is a lifestyle.
I am 75% learning towards going the teacher route. Sometimes a better lifestyle is worth bringing in a much smaller salary. (My wife naturally strongly dislikes my wanting to be a teacher. But maybe if I show her the hourly dollar amount breakdown for being a teacher, and the fact that I can spend more time with our kid she will change her mind. I am also thinking about getting my real estate license in case I get bored over the summer.).
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:26 AM
 
383 posts, read 87,661 times
Reputation: 771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justsomeone9 View Post
Since I have been out of the business world for a while, my only way in might be through a contract job through some temp agency, and then hope that the company I am placed at will give me an offer at some point.

I have considered getting my real estate license. But a lot of people wash out of that field and according to the NAR website for the median realtor who works 40 hours a week the take-home pay is only $40,000. Worse than a mail carrier.

You have a degree that says you might be successful in being self-employed, like a Real Estate Agent. But are you cut out to be one? That's the million dollar question. If you have the discipline and the knowledge on Marketing, the odds are in your favor. Most people fail in Real Estate because they don't know how to market themselves or they have very little capital to keep marketing themselves to stay in business.
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:56 AM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefong123 View Post
You have a degree that says you might be successful in being self-employed, like a Real Estate Agent. But are you cut out to be one? That's the million dollar question. If you have the discipline and the knowledge on Marketing, the odds are in your favor. Most people fail in Real Estate because they don't know how to market themselves or they have very little capital to keep marketing themselves to stay in business.
My first job outside of college was B2B sales. I hate cold-calling and rejection. It seems like being a realtor is more marketing and relationship building (no cold-calling). Still, according the the NAR website, the median income is only $40,000 for a realtor working 40 hours a week. Which is pretty sad when you consider that they have to pay for the our healthcare, no job-sponsored 401k, etc. Then again, the top 5-10% make 80% of the money.
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Old 03-24-2019, 11:08 AM
 
3,630 posts, read 7,243,460 times
Reputation: 4874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justsomeone9 View Post
As a sub, for about 1 hour a day I do nothing because I have a prep time. Plus a 30 minute lunch. So I take it that if you could do it all over again, you would prefer being a teacher over being a software developer, even though you would make much less?
You do realize that actual teachers use that hour of prep time for prep, right?
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Old 03-24-2019, 12:09 PM
 
117 posts, read 39,183 times
Reputation: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by MurphyPl1 View Post
You do realize that actual teachers use that hour of prep time for prep, right?
Yes, I am just speaking as a substitute. I realize teachers have a lot of work and regularly take work home.
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