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Old 03-25-2019, 07:15 AM
 
686 posts, read 249,062 times
Reputation: 1815

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Never work hard unless the company you work for rewards meritocracy, hard work etc. If you pull your weight, become valuable and go nowhere and the company continues to reward the leeches, lazies, cronies, relatives etc.. the company does not DESERVE Your 100 percent effort.

Some people coast because in many places, it doesn't matter how hard you work or not. If you aren' connected, you're stuck . Most companies only look at "hard work" as a sign of weakness and exploit those hard workers.

People think hard work is going to save them from layoff? ROFLMAO.

Look around and see how many useless bums avoid the layoffs, continue getting promoted, etc and how many unconnected valuable, skilled workers got the shaft during the last recession and sense. And tell me again, "working hard will avoid layoffs". Thats just an old wives tale place by management to "Keep the sheep in line". Little to no truth to it whatsoever.
Very good points.

I've learned a very hard lesson. I've learned that the more you help your co-workers, the more your co-workers will come to ask you for help, and eventually they want to put that job on you because you are so good at it. And they will think and say that's your job. When you feel it's TOO much, you don't want to or can't help them anymore, they will hate you.

I've learned that nowadays employees are not valued by their hard work, but by having "good social skills". The more people spend times to go around and talk and talk and talk about non-work related to show that they have life out of work and how important they are, and whisper with each other about this person, that person, and ask others how they are doing to show that they have "concerns" and "care" for others, the more they are valuable. Haha.

So, if you don't know how to slow down and go around to talk with your co-workers, you are stupid. Nobody likes you. You have to learn to go with the flow. You can never finish big workloads coming continuously all the time anyway. The work is always there. Over all, if people don't do their work productively, that's not your problem. It's the management's problem because they don't value the hard working employees; they value the socializing ones more. That's the world.

Last edited by AnOrdinaryCitizen; 03-25-2019 at 07:30 AM..
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:25 AM
 
3,816 posts, read 1,971,730 times
Reputation: 18122
If you were an employer, would you hire a worker or a coaster?

If the job you are doing isn't worth your best efforts, find another job. The self-respect you gain will be immeasurable. You won't have to use a public forum to brag about how little you do at work because your attitude sux.

No, I don't consider myself an "Alpha who puts in 12 hour days". Eight daily hours was enough, but during those eight I did my absolute best for my employer. No slacking. No coasting.
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:49 AM
 
6,875 posts, read 7,270,643 times
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Good for you. Glad it makes you feel better, gives you pride, and self-respect.
I have plenty of all of that -- and don't do any more work than is required to brown nose.

And, no, that won't keep you employed. But it might -- might -- increase the chances of you getting another job quicker. Because as you asked, "If you were an employer, would you hire a worker or a coaster?" And at least if you do enough to get awards, or some sort of recognition*, it looks good on a resume to get you hired someplace else. (where you could coast again.)

* When I talk about coasting, I'm not talking about doing NO work, or work that doesn't meet expectations, or is not acceptable. By coasting I mean, doing just enough not to get fired, with a few extra things thrown in "to look good." But actual out of my way, commitment, hustle, taking on more than I need to? Uh, no. I'm only interested in sucking up to management.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:01 AM
 
686 posts, read 249,062 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Javacoffee View Post
1. If you were an employer, would you hire a worker or a coaster?

2. If the job you are doing isn't worth your best efforts, find another job. The self-respect you gain will be immeasurable. 3. You won't have to use a public forum to brag about how little you do at work because your attitude sux.

4. No, I don't consider myself an "Alpha who puts in 12 hour days". Eight daily hours was enough, but during those eight I did my absolute best for my employer. No slacking. No coasting.
1. Of course every employer wants to hire a worker, not a coaster, and wants a hard-working worker for sure. But the problem is from the management - many of them are not good managers. They favour the ones who know how to flatter them; they like the ones who know how to talk to stroke their egos, to make them feel good.

2. It's easier said than done. If it were so easy to find a job anytime people want to quit, they would quit left and right. And employers would have BIG problems.

3. Some people need to vent, not to brag, in a public forum because they can't say it at work.

4. You say you don't consider … , but actually you do. It shows by your writing it on here to tell everyone what you do. It is like a humble brag.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:10 AM
 
325 posts, read 394,663 times
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These days, I "coast" by concentrating on my own job and duties. I don't put myself out there to volunteer to help anyone without being asked or unless I feel like a process will be broken unless I step in--if asked, I'd totally help out of course, but I'm not looking to take one for the team anymore.

My boss, and his boss, and his boss' boss, get paid more than I do to handle crises. If they delegate down to me? Sure, that's fine. Otherwise, it's not my problem.

And yes, I understand that my way of thinking will not put me on a fast track to internal promotions. But reality is that going above and beyond doesn't always get you promoted either unless you leave. I've seen waaaay too many people take on more than they should because of an invisible carrot dangling in front, only to get passed over for promotions and leave due to burning out and/or being really upset. Meh.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:27 AM
 
1,673 posts, read 548,866 times
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So many people create problems for themselves.

They don't put in more effort because 'the company isn't worth it'. That leads to them not building new skills, not being able to keep up with co-workers, so when layoffs happen, the people who don't put in effort are the first to go (or they are left behind, not promoted, etc).

When those other people get ahead, those same people try to protect their poor choices by claiming 'nepotism' or 'networking' is how other people actually got ahead. You can work hard without getting stressed out. 'coasting' all but guarantees someone will get behind on their skillset, and more often than not puts people into stagnant careers.

Obviously a large number of people will disagree with me here, especially how anti-work this forum is.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:33 AM
 
2,156 posts, read 527,667 times
Reputation: 3746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburban_Guy View Post
I'm at that stage of my career and life where I am starting to 'coast' at work.
I recall taking a Labor Economics class in graduate school from noted labor economist Ed Lazear, who went on to become Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers.

In the class, there was a segment on the phenomenon you describe - "coasting" - and in particular the phenomenon in late-career employees. While I don't know your age, your comment about "stage of my career" indicates you may be in the post-50 year old age category, which was the target of the segment to which I refer.

For most of us, compensation goes up as we grow older and climb a corporate ladder to take on more responsibilities. But since there are fewer and fewer years left prior to retirement, an aging executive has less to lose if he "coasts" and is terminated for failing to perform at the highest levels. After all, it is exceptionally difficult for a company to fire, say, a hypothetical 64 year old executive who is coasting - why bother when you can just wait a few months and he retires? From the point of the hypothetical 64 year old, why bother to do anything other than coast - after all, with only 1 year of work left prior to retirement, if he's terminated for coasting, it isn't a major hit to his financial well being, and if he works very hard he isn't going to reap the long term rewards of his effort.

Sooo... what's an employer to do?

The classic labor economics model of compensation is to shift employee income over time towards the later stages -- and pay the aging employee more and more, so the employee has a monetary incentive not to "coast." But there is a real cost to the employer of doing this, so the employer pays the more junior managers less money earlier in their careers to make up for it. Think of it as dangling a big carrot that can only be reached when you get close to retirement.

But that model was from a different era. I'm not sure it works very well in today's labor markets. In the modern era, everyone is highly mobile. People change employers every few years, leapfrogging their way to the top - or as high as they are able to go given their personal skills. This is now the Golden Era of headhunting - more and more employees are open to changing employers, and employers are desperate to hire competent employees, with headhunters sitting in the middle charging a toll.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:41 AM
 
36 posts, read 10,924 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Coasting fails when the next recession hits.

Oh look, Mr. So-and-so is doing so-and-so on performance. Pink slip time!
Standing outside and saying it's going to rain everyday until it finally rains does not make that a prediction.

Saying a recession is coming for months on end isn't forecasting - economies fluctuate in stability and health...
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:43 AM
 
684 posts, read 182,893 times
Reputation: 1082
I have been coasting for quite some time. No point in me working harder just to be treated like a number and expendable to bean counters who do not have a concern beyond their office doors. They are just after a bonus for reducing costs and burdening others with less.
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Old 03-25-2019, 09:04 AM
 
3,816 posts, read 1,971,730 times
Reputation: 18122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lekrii View Post
So many people create problems for themselves.

They don't put in more effort because 'the company isn't worth it'. That leads to them not building new skills, not being able to keep up with co-workers, so when layoffs happen, the people who don't put in effort are the first to go (or they are left behind, not promoted, etc).

When those other people get ahead, those same people try to protect their poor choices by claiming 'nepotism' or 'networking' is how other people actually got ahead. You can work hard without getting stressed out. 'coasting' all but guarantees someone will get behind on their skillset, and more often than not puts people into stagnant careers.

Obviously a large number of people will disagree with me here, especially how anti-work this forum is.
And that's the key. Too many people today are against hard work. They make a conscience decision to either give excellent performance or to "coast" enough to get by. That means they actually ponder their choices, chose the wrong answer, and then come up with an excuse for it. That excuse always put the blame on the company.

When firing time comes along, the coasters are the first to go, but that's never their fault either.
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