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Old 03-25-2019, 03:39 PM
 
3,423 posts, read 881,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
A business plan simply being about twice the price, even when it doesn't offer symmetrical speeds or fixed IP addresses. I've never seen one for a residential area that offered any specific uptime or enhanced service response.

And I get about six solicitations a week from Comcast.
That's the response I was looking for. And you won't find it in a residential neighborhood. A few things:

- There are too many miles of telco/cable to offer a tighter SLA just anywhere in that big footprint. T1 lines (and now, metro ethernet circuits) are offered around city centers for a reason. Far-flung addresses likely involve many more repeaters, multiplexers, and miles of cable to isolate a trouble. The sheer footage of cable makes it impractical to guarantee a fix in X amount of hours.

- The speeds might be slower in some cases, but telephone companies offer better contractual SLA's than cable companies. Better staffed, and higher level, more tenured people in the field to deal with complex issues, especially those that are intermittent. At least with the enterprise-level circuits.

- The actual time to splice a cable back together after a telephone pole is taken out is about 12-16 hours:
1. Police, Fire, EMS arrive first while power de-energizes the lines
2. Poles are worked from the top-down. Power ALWAYS goes first. Allow 3-4 hours.
3. Cable and telephone are allowed to start picking up their lines ONLY once the scene is cleared and power is restored. Remember, our linemen are splicing in the new cable TWICE, once at each end.

There's NO changing that. For the times when you can't make it to the coffee shop, my best recommendation is to get a router that lets you plug in a USB modem-on-a-stick for a backup connection. Get a SIM card from a carrier that lets you buy prepaid data. You won't have to pay each month for your backup and it will always be ready to failover.
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Old 03-25-2019, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Upstate SC
316 posts, read 195,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
Backup battery, external batteries, backup internet (hotspot), backup location (library or similar. That should have you covered.
That's the answer right there. I have a static IP so a power/provider outage doesn't work but if you are hosting (a) server(s) that MUST be 24/7 you'd have them in a proper data center with redundant power/internet. Probably clustered as well.

Most McDonalds have good internet in addition to the already mentioned alternatives.
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Old 03-25-2019, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,717 posts, read 3,104,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bruce View Post
That's the answer right there. I have a static IP so a power/provider outage doesn't work but if you are hosting server that MUST be 24/7 you'd have them in a proper data center with redundant power/internet. Probably clustered as well.
I lived in a rural area with regular long power outages (over a week, twice; a day or two, annually). Since we had a house generator and I had BIG UPSes on the main systems, we would often retain internet through most shorter outages... but at about the 24-hour mark, the repeater batteries would start to fail and we'd lose it. Since most people only have outages of a few minutes to perhaps most of a day, having UPS power for not only the computer but the communications stack (modem, router, etc.) can keep you connected and working through most of them.
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Old 03-25-2019, 06:07 PM
 
2,477 posts, read 708,263 times
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Library is good but only during the time it is open.
Starbucks is good if you're buying stuff on a regular basis during your time there.
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Old 03-25-2019, 06:20 PM
 
1,102 posts, read 575,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
If your power goes out for a day or two how do you rent an office temporarily or find a computer somewhere to get some of your work done?
Get a Regus membership: https://www.regus.com/membership
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:00 PM
 
4,760 posts, read 4,050,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Geek View Post
Backup battery, external batteries, backup internet (hotspot), backup location (library or similar. That should have you covered.
This. Plus laptops & external hard drives mean portability.

Always have everything important on the cloud.

If it was a crunch day(s) that I needed to be able to run big print jobs, I would grab everything I use for the portable office and go wherever power was working & check into nearest the hotel suite.
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:04 PM
 
6,408 posts, read 3,510,228 times
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I work from home. Have reliable fiber, with a cell phone hotspot as backup. If I wasn’t thrilled with the fiber I would get a second provider (did that previously) as a backup and run through a dual WAN router.

My home is wired for a portable generator, which can run nearly everything for days (or as long as I have and can get gas). I have a smaller inverter in case that goes kaput.

With this strategy I’ve lasted through days of power outages.
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Old 03-25-2019, 07:17 PM
 
3,423 posts, read 881,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I work from home. Have reliable fiber, with a cell phone hotspot as backup. If I wasnít thrilled with the fiber I would get a second provider (did that previously) as a backup and run through a dual WAN router.

My home is wired for a portable generator, which can run nearly everything for days (or as long as I have and can get gas). I have a smaller inverter in case that goes kaput.

With this strategy Iíve lasted through days of power outages.
The problem is that telephone (including fiber) is buried extremely shallow (think 1 ft - the actual operating depth of a ditch witch blade)

When the main lines break, it's easy to get people right on it. It's when individual lines are cut by landscapers or construction. They're just not prioritized as a feeder cable would be.

The only way to mitigate the primary service going down is:

1. Do your own yardwork
2. Oversee all construction on your property
3. Less obvious, but - if you're present when the line is being buried, some AT&T customers would say "I don't want my yard dug up" and we'd call out a directional bore machine to do a "landscape bore" - typically these could reach as deep as 10 ft in the belly of the curve.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:16 PM
 
Location: NYC
12,971 posts, read 8,787,538 times
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Today's smartphone with LTE connectivity is enough for any self-employed to perform all of their work. Unfortunately most people knows very little about how to use their smartphones for work other than email and web.

I had a deal to sign and fax some paper work to a company. Not only I was able to sign the document on the phone I was able to fill the forms on the digital doc. I also faxed photocopies of some documents by taking pics and then using the fax application to fax to the company. All done without going to Staples or Printing store.

If I need a connection to internet without starbucks. I just share my connection with the smartphone to my laptop and I'm able to review documents and submit proposals.
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Old 03-26-2019, 04:17 AM
 
6,408 posts, read 3,510,228 times
Reputation: 5819
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
The problem is that telephone (including fiber) is buried extremely shallow (think 1 ft - the actual operating depth of a ditch witch blade)

When the main lines break, it's easy to get people right on it. It's when individual lines are cut by landscapers or construction. They're just not prioritized as a feeder cable would be.

The only way to mitigate the primary service going down is:

1. Do your own yardwork
2. Oversee all construction on your property
3. Less obvious, but - if you're present when the line is being buried, some AT&T customers would say "I don't want my yard dug up" and we'd call out a directional bore machine to do a "landscape bore" - typically these could reach as deep as 10 ft in the belly of the curve.
Itís a fair point. Luckily the way the fiber is run on my property makes it extremely unlikely to be cut by a landscaper. But something to keep in mind.
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