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Old 03-26-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
1,935 posts, read 2,467,398 times
Reputation: 1671

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You will be perceived as a slacker if you don't put in the 45+ hours, no matter how quick a study you are.
And since you've been asked, it's for you to reply honestly -- and thus admit this job is not a fit. Admit it to yourself first -- if that is the case.
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Old 03-26-2019, 05:32 PM
 
3,771 posts, read 5,470,027 times
Reputation: 2990
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBridge781 View Post
so i followed up with the guy who just said, thanks so much McBridge. I just asked if he thought there'd still be fit. HE said yes there might be but apparently what has him second guessing me is this:

One thing I wanted to call out is that you shared you're looking to maintain ~40 hours a week in your next role. I would say that most folks take 45-55 hours a week to meet their goals, and generally closer to 50-55 hours for the first 6 months while onboarding. With that in mind, is this still an opportunity you want to pursue?


I am used to working 40 hours in my current role now and then doing more work at home. not sure if i'd want to job where the expectation is to put in 50-55 hours a week.

If you want to keep them interested, you could say: You normally take some work home with you. You usually do 40 hours in the office, so all together it's more. Taking work home, let you have more flexibility. And let them know that for the first 6 months you usually do more.
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Old 03-26-2019, 06:38 PM
 
2,053 posts, read 595,092 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBridge781 View Post
I also think it's BS to list a range of 55k-90k and THEN ask someone what their expectations are and not move forward when they choose 85k. This is BOSTON, it's expensive. No one unless they are desperate (which i guess some are) will pick the low end of that based on the job description.
Boston and the range is 55-90k for experienced and they balk at someone asking for the upper range?

Gotta be kidding me...

As another poster said you just can't win these days....
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Old 03-26-2019, 06:43 PM
 
2,053 posts, read 595,092 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by McBridge781 View Post
so i followed up with the guy who just said, thanks so much McBridge. I just asked if he thought there'd still be fit. HE said yes there might be but apparently what has him second guessing me is this:

One thing I wanted to call out is that you shared you're looking to maintain ~40 hours a week in your next role. I would say that most folks take 45-55 hours a week to meet their goals, and generally closer to 50-55 hours for the first 6 months while onboarding. With that in mind, is this still an opportunity you want to pursue?


I am used to working 40 hours in my current role now and then doing more work at home. not sure if i'd want to job where the expectation is to put in 50-55 hours a week.
I feel like the way you describe this hiring manager (and it's very similar to other posters) that this guy is 60 years old and just has no idea about work efficiency. It's almost 2020, jobs are being automated and people still care about arbitrary working hours?

Quote:
Originally Posted by joyeaux View Post
You will be perceived as a slacker if you don't put in the 45+ hours, no matter how quick a study you are.
And since you've been asked, it's for you to reply honestly -- and thus admit this job is not a fit. Admit it to yourself first -- if that is the case.
So they want to balk on pay AND have someone work extra hours just for appearances?
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Old 03-26-2019, 07:16 PM
 
2,404 posts, read 684,967 times
Reputation: 3394
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
It is a dog eat dog world out there and yes they know it is expensive
This is why the only way to get a real raise is to move to a lower COL area and take a pay cut - after you pay your bills, you're way ahead (and that's what is more important).
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Old 03-26-2019, 07:38 PM
 
2 posts, read 376 times
Reputation: 18
I think it's great that the communication of expectations is clear (now instead of later). Look at it this way, if you've routinely done 'more work from home' I'd recommend confirming that handling excess hours during the initial learning curve and crunch times via telecommuting is acceptable.

Also, as Florida2014 said, "Keep in mind salary is only one component, people often overlook great benefits like a company matched 401K plan or a good health insurance plan where the employer covers most of the cost." Many benefits at higher levels are negotiable.

Bottom line, if the position sounds interesting and a good fit for you long term, perhaps email the recruiter and let them know two things:

1) working from home during the initial learning curve and crunch times (after hours) is something you expect, as long as they are fine with you handling the hours over 40 from home

and

2) your salary requirements have some leeway DEPENDING on the entire benefits package since the position seems like a great opportunity. Since you value your down time, maybe leveraging for an additional week or two vacation, or stock options, or whatever might be something to consider?

Good luck!
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Old 03-27-2019, 06:01 AM
 
2,053 posts, read 595,092 times
Reputation: 2905
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurnAroundMN View Post
Also, as Florida2014 said, "Keep in mind salary is only one component, people often overlook great benefits like a company matched 401K plan or a good health insurance plan where the employer covers most of the cost." Many benefits at higher levels are negotiable.
Many of these benefits are now set in stone. Companies are lazy and outsource benefits administration. They don't want to make exceptions or customizations for every employee who asks for 6% 401k match instead of the standard 3%. HR will probably just blurt out "NO!" based on the perceived payroll/admin headache alone. In a big or small company imagine having each individual having a slightly different benefit package or PTO accrual etc. It would be unwieldy and impossible to manage.

If they can't give you the salary you need and deserve (and it's within the market average) then just drop them. At the end of the day they think you're replaceable with someone cheaper anyways. You are NOT valued.
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Old 03-27-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,820 posts, read 18,775,199 times
Reputation: 24482
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
This is why the only way to get a real raise is to move to a lower COL area and take a pay cut - after you pay your bills, you're way ahead (and that's what is more important).


yep and some are not willing to do that .
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Old 03-27-2019, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
12,160 posts, read 10,339,034 times
Reputation: 33141
If you want to work 40 hours per week and they are saying most do 55 in the first 6 months, it'd be a hard pass for me. They probably will expect 50-60 for as long as you are employed by them. They say 45-55 and this is most likely it being sugarcoated as well. I'd appreciate their honesty but I'd pass quickly if I wanted to stay near 40 hrs.
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Old 03-27-2019, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
634 posts, read 238,381 times
Reputation: 1532
If the job is something I'm really passionate about and I have the available time, I'd be open-minded about the extra hours. However, if it's just "another job" then move on. It depends on if the increased work load aligns closely to my career goals.
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