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Old 03-30-2019, 11:03 PM
 
20 posts, read 12,504 times
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I recently got a promotion at my company that I started working for less than a year ago. This is my first management position and I am overseeing former peers. I need some advice with how to deal with them and jealousy. One has been with the company for over 5 years and he had wanted the position. I am the newest and youngest employee there. I want us all to have a nice working environment but there just has been a lot of tension at the job.
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Old 03-31-2019, 12:04 AM
 
10,065 posts, read 4,671,845 times
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No such thing as nice and friendly work environment, you only need a professional one. Follow the military on this, no fraternizing with them, keep it strictly professional. At worst, they will say you are unfriendly. But if they keep doing their jobs, then it's fine. If they don't, then start the disciplinary actions like any manager would.

Let him be jealous, he was there for five years, and didn't appeal to them for a reason... If you didn't get the job, he still wouldn't have gotten it either
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Old 03-31-2019, 12:51 AM
 
17,310 posts, read 10,218,998 times
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What to Do First When Managing Former Peers

How To Deal With Getting Promoted Above Your Peers

You’re the Boss—Now What? 7 To-Dos as a First-Time Manager

9 Skills You Need to Master Before You Become a Manager
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Old 03-31-2019, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,030 posts, read 21,753,522 times
Reputation: 22227
I have had that for the last year or so. It’s strange at first because you were once at the same level. However, you were chosen for a reason.

I just led my team by example, didn’t pretend to know everything, and really listened. It’s a learning curve, it took about three months for everything to settle. People who are jealous will either deal with it or move on.
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Old 03-31-2019, 01:21 PM
 
695 posts, read 253,946 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by farah2619 View Post
I recently got a promotion at my company that I started working for less than a year ago. This is my first management position and I am overseeing former peers. I need some advice with how to deal with them and jealousy. One has been with the company for over 5 years and he had wanted the position. I am the newest and youngest employee there. I want us all to have a nice working environment but there just has been a lot of tension at the job.
There are tons of tips on Google.

Basically, be professional, respectful and fair. Don't listen to the ones who are too sweet and tell you all the things you want to hear, don't punish the ones who are not very socializing but work hard and not to flatter you, like King Lear (in Shakespeare) who liked to listen to what he wanted to hear from the two lying daughters and punished the daughter who told him the truth. Don't play favouritism, you will create more conflicts and friction among employees, and employees and you, you will have more problems to solve and lots of headaches.

Be nice reasonably and approachable, but not to be too friendly; otherwise, they will come to you all the times and ask for favours. The main things is to watch everyone closely, to treat them with respect and fairness. Set boundaries. And lead by example.
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Old 03-31-2019, 01:47 PM
 
695 posts, read 253,946 times
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Oh, one more VERY important thing: don't micromanage your staff, don't be behind their back constantly, and don't always make them to do things your way only. There are many ways to perform something, not only one way (the manager's way). As long as the results are good and done in a reasonable time fame, that is good. Give them some autonomy, give them room to breath and think and make their own decisions sometimes. Don't treat them like little children or like they have no brain of their own. Think about how you would feel if your higher up micromanaged you. Treat others the ways you want to be treated.
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Old 03-31-2019, 02:26 PM
 
2,999 posts, read 6,487,442 times
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Is there someone at work who you could ask to mentor you? Or perhaps find a mentor through a professional organization? It can really help to have a real person to talk to and learn from as you begin your management career.

Also - don't feel pressured to give answers right away. People might come to you with ideas for change or requests for something that benefits them and often new managers make the mistake of feeling like they need to look decisive and make decisions quickly. Often those are the decisions you end up regretting. Slow things down, listen and think it through before getting back to someone with a final answer or request for more information.
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Old 03-31-2019, 03:26 PM
 
96 posts, read 29,933 times
Reputation: 261
Be friendly, but not friends. Do no treat every one equally; you treat the high performers better because they deserve better. But you do treat all with respect.


And keep an open mind.
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Old 03-31-2019, 07:40 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,213 posts, read 935,111 times
Reputation: 6242
Never, ever forget where you came from. You were once one of ďthemĒ. Donít forget that. You have entered a difficult environment managing former peers. Be respectful, be gracious, be professional, be fair. Do not manage by emotions but manage by facts.

Iíve been in your shoes more than once. The first time I screwed up big time. I learned my lessons and took my lumps and got better each time. Relax, itís a process that takes time to master.
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Old 03-31-2019, 09:12 PM
 
695 posts, read 253,946 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
Never, ever forget where you came from. You were once one of ďthemĒ. Donít forget that. You have entered a difficult environment managing former peers. Be respectful, be gracious, be professional, be fair. Do not manage by emotions but manage by facts.

Iíve been in your shoes more than once. The first time I screwed up big time. I learned my lessons and took my lumps and got better each time. Relax, itís a process that takes time to master.
So good advice.
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