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Old 04-12-2019, 07:14 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,343 posts, read 7,987,569 times
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One can say it doesn't hurt to ask. But ultimately it really depends on how the interviewer perceives the request. And, as others have mentioned, if the scheduling allows it.

For me - I think it has more to do with the company. Some places have more to showcase, so they may even offer it. Working in IT, getting a tour of their SOC/NOC and data center has always been part of the interview process (usually 2nd or 3rd interviews). As it is with senior management positions, you'll always get a tour of the different areas. Again, the more things to showcase, the more likely it will be offered. At the end of the day, there isn't much to show if you are a small company in an office suite that simply has a bunch of offices and cubes.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
11,556 posts, read 13,618,858 times
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We greet you at the front door and interview you in the back conference room. So you see pretty much everything except the kitchen.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:28 AM
Status: "The days are getting shorter" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
3,967 posts, read 1,112,182 times
Reputation: 5602
When you apply for the job, ask if you can tour the facility prior to the interview. You may decide you don't want to apply. As a former manager, I would have no problem with this at all.
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:15 AM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,279 posts, read 3,126,005 times
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Post In IT, we'd look for a "Dilbert Index" in the range of 0.1-0.5 for an optimal working environment

Quote:
Originally Posted by macroy View Post
Working in IT, getting a tour of their SOC/NOC and data center has always been part of the interview process (usually 2nd or 3rd interviews). . . . At the end of the day, there isn't much to show if you are a small company in an office suite that simply has a bunch of offices and cubes.
The litmus test for IT used to be to ask for a tour of what would be your work area, add up the "Dilbert Index".

If you saw Dilbert on nearly every cubicle, as if the workers see the pain of their daily workday echoed in the comic, walk away from the job opportunity.

OTOH, if you saw zero Dilbert cartoons anywhere, walk away faster, as this meant that not only was the workplace a dystopian hell-hole, but management realized they were being made fun of and had banned the display of Dilbert comics.

Now seeing Dilbert just means you''ll be working with a bunch of old right-wing red-pillers (NTTAWWT)
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:26 AM
 
Location: New York
743 posts, read 458,198 times
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Disclaimer, I also work in tech, so tours are pretty common in a lot of larger companies because they want to show off their employee amenities. That said, it's a buyer's market, so if you're trying to hire an engineer who has 3 other offers, maybe you can sway them over to your side with a great floor plan, snack bars and game rooms, or whatever. Even if you're staring at a screen all day many people prefer to be doing it in a nice environment.

This can be especially important if you're moving across state lines to work. When I first relocated from the Midwest to NYC to work for a tech startup they arranged a visit after the interview but before I accepted their offer to tour the office and meet with the team. It was part of the whole 'culture fit' idea, trying to make sure you'll be a good addition.

So my answer is no, it is not unreasonably to ask for an interview, but that comes from my own perspective and industry and it may not be considered reasonable for all positions.
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:59 AM
 
4,835 posts, read 1,537,874 times
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Oh okay thanks everyone for the advice.

I have another question if that's okay. When I give them my resume should I was thinking of attaching a letter of recommendation from a previous employer. However, that previous employer is no longer available as a reference to call by phone or email. His phone number no longer exists, and I talked to previous co-workers, and the boss left the country it seems and no one knows where he is now.

So therefore, is it still worth using the letter of recommendation, of the previous employer is no longer contact-able by email or phone, at least not that I can get a hold of?
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:21 AM
 
20,547 posts, read 16,619,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Oh okay thanks everyone for the advice.

I have another question if that's okay. When I give them my resume should I was thinking of attaching a letter of recommendation from a previous employer. However, that previous employer is no longer available as a reference to call by phone or email. His phone number no longer exists, and I talked to previous co-workers, and the boss left the country it seems and no one knows where he is now.

So therefore, is it still worth using the letter of recommendation, of the previous employer is no longer contact-able by email or phone, at least not that I can get a hold of?
Why would they need to get a hold of him? If the letter says "Ironpony was a good worker who was always on time and a team player" that's all they need. There would be no need to call him. The only reason they call former employers is if they want to verify that you worked there, but your old boss doesn't need to be there for that.


Yes, attach it.


I'm thinking they might have already decided they didn't want to hire you, for the reason they said "no" to the tour after the interview. You can ask for a tour, but I would do so before or during the interview, not after, but I wouldn't go into why, because it'll make you look high maintenance.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:03 AM
 
5,248 posts, read 5,170,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
We have time carved out for interviews, not tours. We probably interviewed someone before you, and we probably have someone to interview after you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
We would not agree to that. We do, however, offer a tour when making an offer. Because of the location and amenities it can help convince them to accept, but also, we don’t want to hire someone that doesn’t our working conditions. To answer your question, we would decline, but not hold it against you to have asked. Interviewees are escorted to the conference center from the lobby, and escorted back after.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
It seems dumb. I could see asking for one before accepting an offer.
I have been on many interviews in my field and it is standard practice to show people the facility. I have been shown around at every place I've been to without asking right after the interview.
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:29 AM
 
71 posts, read 28,595 times
Reputation: 177
Went for an interview yesterday
It consisted of a tour and introduction to the staff (3 people)
Not a single question
To be fair the phone interview was in depth
I was in and out within 5 minutes - got back in my car at 12:30 which is the time it was scheduled for
I spent more time preparing
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Old 04-12-2019, 11:44 AM
 
4,835 posts, read 1,537,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Why would they need to get a hold of him? If the letter says "Ironpony was a good worker who was always on time and a team player" that's all they need. There would be no need to call him. The only reason they call former employers is if they want to verify that you worked there, but your old boss doesn't need to be there for that.


Yes, attach it.


I'm thinking they might have already decided they didn't want to hire you, for the reason they said "no" to the tour after the interview. You can ask for a tour, but I would do so before or during the interview, not after, but I wouldn't go into why, because it'll make you look high maintenance.
Oh it's just that usually they call people that I give them on the resume, so I thought they might wanted to do the same for a letter of recommendation. But if they don't, they don't...
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