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Old 04-12-2019, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Central Mass
1,988 posts, read 2,474,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city living View Post
I have been on many interviews in my field and it is standard practice to show people the facility. I have been shown around at every place I've been to without asking right after the interview.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vladlensky View Post
Disclaimer, I also work in tech, so tours are pretty common in a lot of larger companies because they want to show off their employee amenities.
I'm not in tech, but every interview I've had in the last 8 years have included a tour, even if I didn't want one.
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:14 PM
 
9,526 posts, read 13,467,274 times
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I don't think asking for a tour is wrong but dependent on how the office is laid out, just walking back to the conference room is a tour in & of itself.


I would love a tour actually, so I know if I accept the job, what kind of workplace I'm getting myself into. As a potential candidate, I do think you have the right to know.


Check out glassdoor. People sometimes post pictures of the workspace.
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:42 PM
 
20,630 posts, read 16,673,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
I don't think asking for a tour is wrong but dependent on how the office is laid out, just walking back to the conference room is a tour in & of itself.


I would love a tour actually, so I know if I accept the job, what kind of workplace I'm getting myself into. As a potential candidate, I do think you have the right to know.


Check out glassdoor. People sometimes post pictures of the workspace.
These are low wage factory jobs OP is applying for. I don't think people's experience in office fields is comparable. yes, he can ask for a tour, but I'd ask before the interview.


OP also don't assume that any factory is going to be like the one you came from, ask for the tour but don't bring "baggage" from your old place into an interview at a new place.
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:58 PM
 
6,657 posts, read 2,396,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
The last couple of jobs I worked, I really didn't like the working conditions, and they were actually bad to the point where it was effecting my health.

I was wondering if when going for job interviews, does it look bad to ask to see the place more. That way I can get a better idea of the conditions. But when I asked after an interview was over, they didn't want to show me around, so I was was wondering if it looks bad to ask?

That way if they call me back and say I got the job, I will know what I am saying yes to more.

IMO, since all your jobs so far have been manual labor type, minimum wage type jobs...yes, it would look weird. Plus...for all the company knows, you're a corporate spy sent by the competitor to look at their operations.


Now, if a company is trying to lure you to work there, they WILL often take you on a tour. But ordinarily, that's not the case for manual labor type jobs. Just sayin.
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Old 04-12-2019, 03:46 PM
 
4,882 posts, read 1,553,062 times
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Oh okay. Well the last two manual labor jobs had really bad health conditions, and so I thought if I got a tour, I would get a better idea if I would be the right employee for the job or not.

As for corporate spies, I find that kind of far fetched, like are they sure they are not being paranoid, if someone asks?
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Old 04-12-2019, 05:14 PM
 
6,893 posts, read 7,297,903 times
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I wouldn't say it looks bad. It's not a matter of that. From the employer's POV, it's likely a little premature.
Think about it, they're not even sure if they want to hire you yet. Why would they give you a tour? Just to chit-chat.

Sure applicants want to check out the physical place and space. So we don't waste our time if we see red flags.
But just as we don't want to waste our time. The interviewer won't want to waste his or her's either.

Of course, one could argue that if the hiring person is willing to take the applicant on a 15 minute tour, and the applicant doesn't like it -- and withdraws.....well then that tour just saved the hiring person MORE than 15 minutes of working on vetting the applicant and further, only for the person to turn the job down. And that argument does make some sense.

But as I think most times during the interview process the advantage is in the hiring company's favor so they get to set the timeline and steps in the hiring process. And if they don't want to do tours before they've narrowed the field. That's the way it will be. The applicant just has to ask to get a tour for a tour at a latter date.

WHAT I"M CURIOUS ABOUT IS how is it perceived when the person you've made the offer to, then asks for a tour. Will that person get the response of, "Oh sure when can you come in?" OR will the hiring manager balk, or for some reason this will be a high maintenance person, because 99% of applicants don't ask, they just accept an offer (after due consideration of course) but without having a tour of the place. Sort of you've got the offer, do you want it, or not?They wouldn't be curt or anything, but just be annoyed thinking, "what you can't decide if you want it without a tour? You'll get a tour after you start.
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Old 04-12-2019, 05:29 PM
 
17,319 posts, read 10,236,660 times
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I don't think there's anything particularly wrong with asking for a tour. it's certainly not on any list of "questions never to ask during an interview" I've seen online.

As someone else pointed out, in my industry it's been pretty standard to take applicants through the areas for a brief tour to give them an idea of what we do and the scope.

I think it would be less frequent if it's more of a desk type job in an office setting.

5 questions every candidate should ask in a job interview

Quote:
3. “Can I have a quick tour?”
See also: “Can I meet some people I’d be working with?”

Both questions will get you out of the interview room and allow you to get a better look at the office. This will give you a chance to gauge co-worker interaction, workspace design (lighting, noise level, cleanliness) and the department as a whole, says Michelle Comer, practice area leader and vice president at the Messina Group, a staffing consulting firm.

Requesting a tour or a quick introduction to potential co-workers also “signals to the interviewer that a candidate is taking a vested interest in the position,” she says.
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Old 04-12-2019, 05:57 PM
 
7,968 posts, read 9,727,619 times
Reputation: 14033
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Why would they need to get a hold of him? If the letter says "Ironpony was a good worker who was always on time and a team player" that's all they need. There would be no need to call him. The only reason they call former employers is if they want to verify that you worked there, but your old boss doesn't need to be there for that.


Yes, attach it.


DO NOT ATTACH IT!


It is a letter that cannot be verified. You possibly could have written it yourself. (Not saying your did; but how does the employer know that?)


FWIW, I never ask for references; nor do I ever call the names people provide. Why?? Well, why would someone ever provide a name that wasn't going to say wonderful things; whether true or not?


That being said; I know my industry. And with 85% of applicants, I know people who have worked with them an various jobs in the past. That is who I call; those I trust to be honest.


One of the greatest hires I EVER made (he will absolutely be my boss someday) was someone I was not 100% sure based on his resume. But I called a old contact at an ex-employer; and she could not speak more highly of him. He had a great interview....and the rest is history!
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Old 04-12-2019, 06:31 PM
 
4,882 posts, read 1,553,062 times
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Yeah that's what I thought maybe the employer would think I wrote it myself. It has the former employer's signed signature though. I suppose I could get another one from another previous employer if that's a good idea. But I was told before not to ask previous employer's for recommendations, if you quit them to go to a new job.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:44 PM
 
20,630 posts, read 16,673,422 times
Reputation: 38784
Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
DO NOT ATTACH IT!


It is a letter that cannot be verified. You possibly could have written it yourself. (Not saying your did; but how does the employer know that?)


FWIW, I never ask for references; nor do I ever call the names people provide. Why?? Well, why would someone ever provide a name that wasn't going to say wonderful things; whether true or not?


That being said; I know my industry. And with 85% of applicants, I know people who have worked with them an various jobs in the past. That is who I call; those I trust to be honest.


One of the greatest hires I EVER made (he will absolutely be my boss someday) was someone I was not 100% sure based on his resume. But I called a old contact at an ex-employer; and she could not speak more highly of him. He had a great interview....and the rest is history!
He is a disabled young adult who works low wage factory jobs, and has a letter from someone who hired him who gave him a letter saying he worth hiring. I would use it.
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