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Old 04-12-2019, 01:31 PM
 
780 posts, read 203,266 times
Reputation: 1134

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
Any company that requires consistent weekly hours like those is completely dysfunctional IMO and probably has all kinds of problems with turnover and being short staffed. In the end they will probably go out of business

Unless you’re a doctor saving lives, I see no reason to work like that
A lot of 'long hours' jobs usually pay top dollar. Usually. Therefore, some people are very much attracted to them.

Some people enjoy the long hours, because they are really invested in their work; probably more so than their life outside of work. The term workaholic originated to describe people like this.

Other places may actually just be dysfunctional, and they wind up being a revolving door for talent.

There are lots of different scenarios.

If working 60+ hours routinely isn't your idea of bliss, then those are your priorities. I make a relatively good salary, and I'm very comfortable. However, no matter what the salary is, I don't want to be working north of 40 hours a week regularly. I prefer my life at home so much more. I don't care if the job paid $250k or more. I wouldn't want to do that. Those are my priorities. I can live a comfortable life without selling all of my time (outside of bed) to the company, and that is what I am happy with. Everyone is entitled to their own preferences.

The real problem arises when people start looking down at others for their preferences. Just because you don't want to commit your life to the company doesn't make you a loser, and you're not necessarily a loser if you want to dedicate your life to the company. It's about finding your perfect balance, and everyone should mind their own business and just shut up about anyone else's.

Last edited by Sir Quotes A Lot; 04-12-2019 at 02:32 PM..
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:39 PM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,619,414 times
Reputation: 38571
Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
Plenty of people who would take your place? Are they lining up around the block? No, I don't think so. Anyone who is stupid enough to fall for that line has to learn things the hard way. It's management's job to staff the resources properly.
That person IS management. Again, the topic is not just management, but senior management. IMO to get to that stage means working your butt off including after hours. I have never heard of a senior management job that allowed leaving on time every day, and not being on call to fix issues that arise.
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Old 04-12-2019, 01:58 PM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: USA
996 posts, read 384,185 times
Reputation: 2669
When I started with my employer in 1985, I did steel and paper mill startups. 10 to 12 hours a day with every third weekend off is normal.

I loved it but itís not work for a young man with a new baby. I took a leave of absence, took care of my daughter during the day when earning a masters in the evening.

In my current, global role, I keep up with email all.the.time. In fact, weíre on vacation and Iím posting from Luxembourg where itís almost 10 pm. Iíve kept up with email and donít mind - itís better to keep up than come home to a thousand un-read messages.

I donít mind- I manage my schedule to fit my needs and make up by doing stuff I need to do when the feeling hits. Itís a great trade-off.
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:04 PM
 
3,756 posts, read 2,123,163 times
Reputation: 10268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
A lot of 'long hours' jobs usually pay top dollar. Usually. Therefore, some people are very much attracted to them.

Some people enjoy the long hours, because they are really invested in their work; probably more so than their life outside of work. The term workaholic originated to describe people like this.

Other places may actually just be dysfunctional, and they wind up being a revolving door for talent.

There are lots of difference scenarios.

If working 60+ hours routinely isn't your idea of bliss, then those are your priorities. I make a relatively good salary, and I'm very comfortable. However, no matter what the salary is, I don't want to be working north of 40 hours a week regularly. I prefer my life at home so much more. I don't care if the job paid $250k or more. I wouldn't want to do that. Those are my priorities. I can live a comfortable life without selling all of my time (outside of bed) to the company, and that is what I am happy with. Everyone is entitled to their own preferences.

The real problem arises when people start looking down at others for their preferences. Just because you don't want to commit your life to the company doesn't make you a loser, and you're not necessarily a loser if you want to dedicate your life to the company. It's about finding your perfect balance, and everyone should mind their own business and just shut up about anyone else's.
it doesn’t mean you’re a loser but it COULD mean you are a sucker and are being taken advantage of by a greedy company especially if your uncompensated for all those ridiculous hours you are putting in. If someone is working 60-70 hours every week, the company should hire more help and get staffed accordingly to the workload

Theres a lot of companies out there grinding their workforce into the dirt and taking advantage of people. People need to be on the lookout for that IMO

Once in a blue moon I can see something like this when it comes to deadlines etc. but weekly that’s insane
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:08 PM
 
659 posts, read 276,921 times
Reputation: 748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yes, in the last few years of my career, I worked some unbelievably long days, but also, we were expected to check email and respond if necessary nights, weekends, and on vacation.

It was rough at times, but retiring at 57 and having that pension check land in my account the last business day of every month makes it feel as if it was worth it.
This is the life in Sr. management. It never stops. Emails and calls start when you get out of bed. You never know when the day will end and things continue on into the evening and weekend. You are never really disconnected. Even if you get to go on a pseudo vacation, the laptop and cell phone go along with. While the family frolicks on the beach, you are back in the hotel room sitting on a conference call. I get a laugh at all the comments on CD from people that think senior management goes home early, spends days at the golf course, lives an easy life, etc., while the workers are doing everything. Far from the truth. Yes, you make a good income, but there is a price to pay.
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Florida
22,292 posts, read 9,471,458 times
Reputation: 18199
Quote:
Originally Posted by recently laid off View Post
Has anyone here worked in a company where senior management required officially or unofficially that the professionals work a 60-80 hour work week?

I have friends and family who work for law firms that expect their staff to put in 12 hour days and expect some work on weekends too. It was part of the culture. If you did not like it, move on there were plenty of people who would take your place. Pay is good but no extra for any overtime hours.

Is the 60-80 hour workweek as common as it used to be? Tell us your stories of long hard work weeks.
Usually law firms that require those amount of hours are very large firms, often in cities. Those putting in long hours are usually Associates who want to make Partner.

They are expected to work very long hours and be there if needed. If they are very ambitious--they don't care. They are in it for the long haul and feel the rewards come later. Also--the television industry expects people to work many hours--whenever needed, and again, people do it for the rewards down the line--it is about ambition.

Rarely have I heard or seen secretaries, assistants, who are working a regular job, etc. at those companies and firms ever have to work those kinds of hours without receiving overtime pay. Not unless they are gunning for a promotion. Best if there are enough employees to fall under federal employment law.
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:12 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,442,161 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
When I started with my employer in 1985, I did steel and paper mill startups. 10 to 12 hours a day with every third weekend off is normal.

I loved it but it’s not work for a young man with a new baby. I took a leave of absence, took care of my daughter during the day when earning a masters in the evening.

In my current, global role, I keep up with email all.the.time. In fact, we’re on vacation and I’m posting from Luxembourg where it’s almost 10 pm. I’ve kept up with email and don’t mind - it’s better to keep up than come home to a thousand un-read messages.

I don’t mind- I manage my schedule to fit my needs and make up by doing stuff I need to do when the feeling hits. It’s a great trade-off.
This is exactly why I do it. My co doesn't mandate it but if there isn't enough coverage then they ask. I just hate coming back from vacation and sifting through millions of emails. Plus if it is something I can just answer quickly for a client while on vacation, why not?
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Old 04-12-2019, 02:31 PM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,619,414 times
Reputation: 38571
Quote:
Originally Posted by DorianRo View Post
it doesnít mean youíre a loser but it COULD mean you are a sucker and are being taken advantage of by a greedy company especially if your uncompensated for all those ridiculous hours you are putting in. If someone is working 60-70 hours every week, the company should hire more help and get staffed accordingly to the workload

Theres a lot of companies out there grinding their workforce into the dirt and taking advantage of people. People need to be on the lookout for that IMO

Once in a blue moon I can see something like this when it comes to deadlines etc. but weekly thatís insane
Again SENIOR management, the ones who OP stated are working all those extra hours, are the ones that make these decisions.
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Old 04-12-2019, 03:31 PM
 
1,859 posts, read 715,844 times
Reputation: 3975
Quote:
Originally Posted by recently laid off View Post
Has anyone here worked in a company where senior management required officially or unofficially that the professionals work a 60-80 hour work week?

I have friends and family who work for law firms that expect their staff to put in 12 hour days and expect some work on weekends too. It was part of the culture. If you did not like it, move on there were plenty of people who would take your place. Pay is good but no extra for any overtime hours.

Is the 60-80 hour workweek as common as it used to be? Tell us your stories of long hard work weeks.
Yes, I worked for several IT companies as a software developer where heavy unpaid overtime work like you describe was required. If you didn't do it, you were fired. As salaried employees, there is not much that you can do but grin and bear it. Or leave the company. When management says you jump, you jump or you are shown the door, or jump out of that company if you don't want to deal with it.
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Old 04-12-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,026 posts, read 54,537,410 times
Reputation: 66369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1921 View Post
This is the life in Sr. management. It never stops. Emails and calls start when you get out of bed. You never know when the day will end and things continue on into the evening and weekend. You are never really disconnected. Even if you get to go on a pseudo vacation, the laptop and cell phone go along with. While the family frolicks on the beach, you are back in the hotel room sitting on a conference call. I get a laugh at all the comments on CD from people that think senior management goes home early, spends days at the golf course, lives an easy life, etc., while the workers are doing everything. Far from the truth. Yes, you make a good income, but there is a price to pay.
More than once the alarm went off at 5:30, and I checked my phone to see that at 1:05 my boss had sent an email saying she needed xyz for an 8:30 meeting, and I had to be at my desk in the city before 8 to get it ready for her. And SHE sent the email because she'd just gotten off a midnight phone call.
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