U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-13-2019, 05:42 AM
 
1,871 posts, read 723,005 times
Reputation: 3994

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
Meanwhile, you drink the kool-aid, put in all these additional hours for nothing while the owners get rich. While they dangle a bonus which if you did the math falls short of paying time and a half for over time. Too often people believe the excuses of management for the reasons. It is their failing that people have to work over 40 hours a week unpaid on a continual basis. No amount of nonsense about being told this up front wearing it like a badge that this is what professionals do is going to paint it in a better picture. I'm a project manager and we plan projects. We don't plan or expect people working 60-70-80 hour a week and certainly not unpaid. We plan to get the work done so that no one is working overtime to begin with. If you plan projects this way, you have a very high chance of achieving it. But if the management is bad and starts off telling you how abusive they are without calling it abuse but sugar-coating it with phrases like "challenge you", it doesn't make it any better. Sadly people get caught up (drink the kool-aid) into what management tells them because they set the tone and before you know it, people are being abused by they don't even know it, and make excuses for it. "Well, there is work that needs to be done!".

As for those who have no life or trying to avoid it, who stay there 60/70/80 hours week, those types from my experience aren't efficient workers and are often late on deadlines. No, they aren't working so hard and spread so thin, they procrastinate and don't have the best productivity.
I agree with your viewpoint. And you work for a decent company. But the companies that I worked for had a different mindset. They viewed putting in more hours as putting in more work. If you worked more you got more work done, right? If you poured more water into a glass for a longer time, then the glass would contain more water, right? Of course there is a limitation. The glass is only so big. That represents the total weekly hours possible. That is 168 hours. Yes, these Neanderthals do understand that the human body cannot work all those 168 hours, but you can sure come close. What about the employees' work/life balance? What is that? And who cares? We've got a business to run and don't coddle our employees. If our employees don't like working those hours, they can leave, right? And we don't want those kind of people working for us anyway, so good riddance! Our employees better continue to put in those aggressive hours or they're gone. Look how much free work we are getting beyond the 40 "standard" weekly work hours. Can you imagine someone working just 40 hours a week? Obviously that person has a lousy work ethic and should be fired.

Oh, yeah. Who even needs any bonuses? You should be working hard, real hard just because you are "interested in your job". You're tough, so show us how tough you are in putting in as many overtime hours that you can. Then you just might earn our respect and gratitude.

So this is the kind of mindset that I saw from my management. The simplistic thinking that:

More hours = more work produced

And at the same efficiency as someone who only puts in 40 hours per week. The "tough" employee would somehow overcome that by staying just as alert and just as effective even if they put in 124 hours a week. Because they are "tough".

It is fantasy thinking. But management is in charge and they do the thinking for the ordinary employees. Don't like that thinking? Then leave! We don't want you anyway! We can get plenty of other suckers (oh, sorry, employees) to come in and do your job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-13-2019, 05:57 AM
 
Location: SC
8,793 posts, read 5,672,057 times
Reputation: 12805
I had only one job (contract) where management asked me - going in - if I would be willing to put in a LOT of hours. I thought about it and because they thought the bulk of the hours would be in the winter when I would otherwise be pretty much confined to an empty temporary apartment where I used a 15" computer screen for a TV, and the rest of my furniture consisted of a dining table and two chairs, a easy chair and a bed that I made, I said sure.

It was high pay per hour and they paid for every minute I worked, and the boss was appreciative enough to provide breakfast and lunch on the weekends. I worked about 80 hours a week and spent much of my off time either sleeping or in one of the nearby casinos. Once Spring sprang, work was reduced back to normal and I was free to travel the PNW taking in the sights.

All-in-all, it was probably one of the best working arrangement I ever had.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 08:43 AM
 
2,078 posts, read 606,160 times
Reputation: 2961
Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post

All-in-all, it was probably one of the best working arrangement I ever had.
90% of the time when there's an end in sight and OT is paid people won't have problems with this arrangement!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 08:47 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,361,982 times
Reputation: 20438
Over the Holidays the Hospital IT person put in 105 hours in one week...

One IT was on his honeymoon... another was out sick as a dog and another one was injured on a ski trip...

Kind of crazy 105 hours or 15 hours per day on the clock but it did happen and his personal best for one 7 day period...

The Hospital CEO called him in Jose said he was working too many hours...

They tried to pull in IT from sister facilities but they were all tight due to the Holidays...

I asked Jose how he was holding up and he said just fine... 27, single and into cars...

He is good at what he does and great attitude... no matter when you call him he has a smile and says I am on my way... even if it takes awhile...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
3,429 posts, read 9,259,341 times
Reputation: 2038
The problem is, most companies have to be responsive to the needs of their customers. I work for a financial services company, and we are heavily driven by the stock market. Business hours are 8AM to 8PM m-f, so every day is at least a 12-hour workday. On top of that there are customers who are West-coast or overseas based and expect people to be available through their regular work day. Also, we close when the stock market closes, but not everyone follows that, and many customers expect full customer support on holidays and weekends.

Our busiest time of year is from September through the end of the year, when customers are having their employees going through benefit re-enrollment, or are going through system changes that they want to be in effect on January 1st of the new year. That means that time-off for Thanksgiving and Christmas is not possible in order to keep the staffing levels up to meet the customer demands.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 09:22 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,361,982 times
Reputation: 20438
Financial Services ranks low on my list...

The Hospital is with Fidelity and not a single person here has seen the Fidelity person in the last 12 months...

I had two confirmed appointments and both cancelled... one in advance and another the night before...

I was surprised to learn the reps here in the SF Bay Area fly in from SoCal...

Missed or cancelled appointments sure do not inspire confidence... I guess the SF Bay Area Market for Hospitals is too small to have a local rep?

The latest is we are told we can travel to our sister facility for a one to one meeting...

Some have hundreds of thousands of dollars or more with the plan yet keeping a confirmed appointment is too difficult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 09:40 AM
 
20,648 posts, read 16,680,404 times
Reputation: 38816
Quote:
Originally Posted by superk View Post
The problem is, most companies have to be responsive to the needs of their customers. I work for a financial services company, and we are heavily driven by the stock market. Business hours are 8AM to 8PM m-f, so every day is at least a 12-hour workday. On top of that there are customers who are West-coast or overseas based and expect people to be available through their regular work day. Also, we close when the stock market closes, but not everyone follows that, and many customers expect full customer support on holidays and weekends.

Our busiest time of year is from September through the end of the year, when customers are having their employees going through benefit re-enrollment, or are going through system changes that they want to be in effect on January 1st of the new year. That means that time-off for Thanksgiving and Christmas is not possible in order to keep the staffing levels up to meet the customer demands.
That’s an important point about the different time demands of different clients. One of the reasons many law firms are now exporting their paralegal work to India, is because they can have work done after normal U.S. working hours. Clients now are not loyal to any particular company, and if you can’t get their stuff done when they want it, there are many other companies who will. People are saying corporate greed, however they are just trying to survive in a global world just as everyone else is.

I’m sure there are many many thousands of accountants putting in 14, 15, 16 hour days right now, and even doing work at home. It just goes with the territory and some fields.
However again, high-level executives, senior management who OP asked about in the original post, has worked well beyond eight hours a day for probably 100 years. That is nothing new. Very few people make it to executive level without working hundreds of hours off the clock on their journey up the ladder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Southern California
5,492 posts, read 8,170,747 times
Reputation: 5172
I wouldn't do it & I've never worked in an industry that does this. What kind of life is this?! The only way I may do it is temporarily for just a few months at once to really save up $$$ for BIG things: House, car, vacation, to invest &/or pay off big debt &/or get ahead on bills, but I won't keep it up for too long.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
One time my employer changed my hours to 60 hours a week, and since it was a very physical job, it was very tiring and do not like working more than 45 hours a week, max. He was breaking the labor laws cause where I live, you don't have to legally go over 44 a week in that type of job.

But when I made a complaint about the labor laws being broken, he threatened to fire me unless I kept coming in and not pursue that course of action further. I was going to pursue it further anyway, but the company happened to be bought out by another company and we went out of business anyway, so...
Yeah, 1 person complaining isn't going to do anything unfortunately. The only way change will happen is if a group of the employees complained to the Labor Board & even then, the unethical employer can just fire everyone in waves & hire all new people. I don't know how the amount of employers get away w/ this like they do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,054 posts, read 3,228,145 times
Reputation: 8245
Quote:
Originally Posted by recently laid off View Post
Has anyone here worked in a company where senior management required officially or unofficially that the professionals work a 60-80 hour work week?

I have friends and family who work for law firms that expect their staff to put in 12 hour days and expect some work on weekends too. It was part of the culture. If you did not like it, move on there were plenty of people who would take your place. Pay is good but no extra for any overtime hours.

Is the 60-80 hour workweek as common as it used to be? Tell us your stories of long hard work weeks.
Well, it seems the way costs are going and lawsuits are rising, the lawyers seem to be running almost 24/7 Plus if the lawyer is on a "Collect if you win" case, they'll beat down doors to make the paycheck bigger...

Now for some clock puncher like me, I just finally relented and gave a co-worker 2 days of OT I had taken for another worker. I have lost only 7 hours, but still have 80 hours and 36 OT....I'll still have 18 hours OT for the next check.

I know some construction guys who have done 14 hr days for weeks on end. But that's the nature of some projects.

Few of our management ever show up on a weekend. Unless it's inventory. Then even the President shows to help.

But as we have learned, several companies who hire HB1 workers do so since they will work 70 hours a wee without complaining...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2019, 12:13 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,361,982 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forever Blue View Post
I wouldn't do it & I've never worked in an industry that does this. What kind of life is this?! The only way I may do it is temporarily for just a few months at once to really save up $$$ for BIG things: House, car, vacation, to invest &/or pay off big debt &/or get ahead on bills, but I won't keep it up for too long.



Yeah, 1 person complaining isn't going to do anything unfortunately. The only way change will happen is if a group of the employees complained to the Labor Board & even then, the unethical employer can just fire everyone in waves & hire all new people. I don't know how the amount of employers get away w/ this like they do.
Union???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top