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Old 04-13-2019, 01:26 PM
 
120 posts, read 36,386 times
Reputation: 218

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Definition of good project:

* Problem statement is straightforward
* Few unknowns
* Creates business value

If you are lucky to be given good projects in a given fiscal year then you will get good bonuses and promotions.

This year my projects have sucked and I'm expecting very little reward despite being more skilled and harder working than last year when I had awesome projects to work on.
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Old 04-13-2019, 02:21 PM
 
1,703 posts, read 557,435 times
Reputation: 3605
So it looks like you need to work on defining problem statements, clarifying unknowns, and quantifying business value on projects you are given.
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Old 04-13-2019, 03:40 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,828 posts, read 54,521,132 times
Reputation: 31139
It sounds like they are passing around the good projects, you had the last year, now someone else gets them? I assign projects to all of my people, mostly based on their personal strengths. I also encourage them to come to my office and talk any time they want to discuss their assignments, ask for different projects, or even suggest new projects. That’s part of employee retention, more important now than ever with the best people being poached. We seem to be losing them most often to Amazon and Starbucks. Not tech, but accountants, finance and real estate people. Have you talked to your boss about it?
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Old 04-14-2019, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,296 posts, read 1,163,397 times
Reputation: 5412
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallbuilder View Post
Definition of good project:

* Problem statement is straightforward
* Few unknowns
* Creates business value

If you are lucky to be given good projects in a given fiscal year then you will get good bonuses and promotions.

This year my projects have sucked and I'm expecting very little reward despite being more skilled and harder working than last year when I had awesome projects to work on.
It's easy to do an easy job. It's those who succeed at the tough jobs that are really valuable employees.

First, if a given project doesn't provide business value, why is it being done?

If a problem statement isn't "straighforward", why can't you get it clarified, or issue a memo stating where you're intending to take it?

We have account execs with eight-figure numbers who are making over half a million dollars a year. Some people will complain that they were given "easy" territories, and if only that was mine, I'd be killing it, too! But those "easy" territories were developed with a lot of hard work, and it takes a lot of hard behind-the-scenes work to maintain them and the relationships in them.

Or, some folks just make their jobs look easy.
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Old 04-14-2019, 10:10 AM
 
6,859 posts, read 3,725,365 times
Reputation: 18098
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallbuilder View Post
Definition of good project:

* Problem statement is straightforward
* Few unknowns
* Creates business value

If you are lucky to be given good projects in a given fiscal year then you will get good bonuses and promotions.

This year my projects have sucked and I'm expecting very little reward despite being more skilled and harder working than last year when I had awesome projects to work on.
You've pretty much captured how ours work as well, but I would change the last one -- business value doesn't entire into the decision so much as how much senior management personally likes it. We spend a lot of money on low value project. And add two more. Low risk meaning your probability of success is high and high cost, meaning people are impressed by how much money is involved. Again, cost, not value.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jnojr View Post
It's easy to do an easy job. It's those who succeed at the tough jobs that are really valuable employees.

First, if a given project doesn't provide business value, why is it being done?

If a problem statement isn't "straighforward", why can't you get it clarified, or issue a memo stating where you're intending to take it?
....
Can't say for the OP's case, but where I am the answers to your questions are:
a. If it doesn't provide value, why is it being done? Because the senior management likes it. May sound silly, but they often make decisions based on how familiar they are with the need, not whether it is a high value need or just a nice to have.

and b. Problem statement isn't straightforward. Many things haven't been done before or are on the bleeding edge of what's doable. The things that create the biggest value, and highest potential return are also undefined and high risk. There is no straightforward definition. You may go halfway down the path and discover you're on the wrong path, or worse, reach the wrong destination. And you won't know until you get there.
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Old 04-14-2019, 05:12 PM
 
2,075 posts, read 602,953 times
Reputation: 2948
Sounds about right. I'm expecting a lower bonus next year because our department just got shafted in a big way politically despite being a key revenue generating group in the entire business (F100)
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Old 04-14-2019, 08:22 PM
 
2,111 posts, read 2,095,073 times
Reputation: 3563
The way to eliminate this is to start your own business. That way you can pick your projects, your territories, and everything else. I learned when I started my business that I could sell anywhere, I could decide what I could sell, I could decide if I was going to sell to a particular client or pass. I did pass on a few bad fits.

Otherwise, there's always someone that appears to get something better than you got.
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Old 04-15-2019, 02:29 PM
 
2,075 posts, read 602,953 times
Reputation: 2948
Quote:
Originally Posted by macrodome2 View Post
The way to eliminate this is to start your own business. That way you can pick your projects, your territories, and everything else. I learned when I started my business that I could sell anywhere, I could decide what I could sell, I could decide if I was going to sell to a particular client or pass. I did pass on a few bad fits.

Otherwise, there's always someone that appears to get something better than you got.
The challenge is that I've gone that route (on the side) and it's incredibly difficult to talk sense into business owners who are perfectly fine with throwing $100,000 down the drain annually because they don't take the time to educate themselves on new technology or strategies to improve their profitability. There is also the issue that most successful entrepreneurs in B2B get their clients through word of mouth (relationships) and not pure prospecting. It's a trust factor.

B2B is the future for most cash strapped entrepreneurs because B2C tends to be in the red the first few years and requires cash infusion from gamblers. Either way I don't have the connections required to get VC funding on a loss leader for 5 years or that can connect me with SMBs who are actually educated on developments of competitors and want to expand/scale their operations up.

It's infinitely harder to convince Mom & Pop #334 to sign on with you even for free trial or low fee because they are skeptical of everything. They only trust services recommended to them by their son Anthony, who happens to be a card carrying member of the Fraternal Order of Anthony

If you think I'm exaggerating I'm not. I've even had my mother try to sell for me (as an older Woman hopefully she'd be less intimidating and perceived as less salesy) they take the card, say they need exactly what they provide and guess what - Never reach out. She has recorded about 100 leads and not one person has reached out. When you understand that random Women walk up to my Mother in the mall (she is retired) and complement her on her outfit and hair, etc. you will understand how insane this is. There are people from all walks of life that for some reason feel comfortable telling her their whole life story, and talk about how their son's business needs help. She is like well no problem my son can help fix that contact him and she gives a general overview.

They never contact me. There's 1 million ways to get in touch. E-mail, LinkedIN, text, call, Facebook company page, my Mother's cell, etc.

I have ultimately concluded it's a cultural problem in America. Everyone wants to DIY at the end of the day and live and die by their own sword. No one wants to collaborate at the SMB level. When you go to local SMB networking events you'll get 100 people who say they are SUPER interested and will get in touch, you follow-up and nothing. Or it's this and that excuse. I've solicited enough business to know - They REALLY need my service, but when it comes down to brass tacks they just can't be bothered for some reason to improve their business model.

Willing to wager, many others have experienced the same. Unless they happen to have the right connections. So until then, slaving away for F100s I go....
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