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Old 04-16-2019, 10:39 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,349 posts, read 7,995,956 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srjth View Post
So I had a final interview for a job and I didn't mention that I have a planned and already paid for vacation about 2 weeks after the start date will be. I've read after the fact that this should be mentioned during the interview but I didn't do that. Now I'm wondering if I get the job offer, how I bring this up and if this can be saved or am I doomed?
There's no right answer to this - or the answer will depend on your specific circumstance.

I've never disclosed any vacation or plans until an offer was made and we start discussing start dates.
Personally - there's no need to talk about that until an offer is made. Companies have different timelines in terms of making final decisions and offers, etc. Why would I need to mention a vacation that's happening a month from now when it may be a week or two before I even have an offer?

In your case, you were given a start date - assuming that is far enough ahead. I guess it really depends on how this was communicated. If the interviewer/hiring manager made it a point to discuss this process like: "Srjth - we have a set schedule for training and onboarding. So, we're looking to bring you in the week of A. Do you have any issues starting then if an offer is made before Y?"

If you just said, "sure, no problem". Then I can see where the hiring manager may have a "WTF?" moment. But how much impact that would have would really depend on the role you're playing. Someone being hired as one of a dozen entry-level analysts with a bunch of others that applied is likely going to be viewed a bit different than a new CFO of the company.

In either case, if you are given an offer, you obviously would need to bring that up. At that point, you'll get a better gauge on how acceptable this will be.

 
Old 04-16-2019, 10:42 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,457,526 times
Reputation: 5695
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I see what youíre saying but note that the employer isnít the one that is forcing a choice - OP applied and interviewed for a job knowing a vacation was coming up.
Yes but it is presumptuous to bring it up @ an interview. It's best to bring it up when the offer is made.


I am dealing with a similar type thing. I suspect an offer may come in. I have a trip booked in 2 months for 2 weeks in duration.


I'm planning to tell them @ time of offer if there is one. They can work around me and if they won't, I don't want to work there then b/c that tells me something about their culture.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 10:45 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,457,526 times
Reputation: 5695
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
If you can afford to walk away from a firm job offer—then kudos to you
Other people might have different situation
There are likely multiple fall back choices for the company to pick from in this climate-especially if they are making multiple hires
Cutting off your nose for a short term option vs getting a long term option is not smart thinking...
There are plenty of good companies that because of the nature of the business don’t let people take vacations at certain times—some even force vacation time at specific times...
I can b/c I already have a decent job. If I were unemployed, perhaps it would be different. Ball is in my court - I don't NEED any particular job. I'm just seeing if I can get more $$ somewhere else b/c why not. I have nothing to lose … so I can afford to be picky and will be.


& I value my life and time outside work.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,177 posts, read 11,803,134 times
Reputation: 32193
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I see what youíre saying but note that the employer isnít the one that is forcing a choice - OP applied and interviewed for a job knowing a vacation was coming up.
So what? I know women (several of them) who have gone though the interview process and been hired when they are pregnant, sometimes even 7 or 8 months along. They got hired, even with the employer knowing they would be taking several months off on maternity leave shortly after being hired. The employer wanted to find the person who was the right fit and was able to work around normal human things that are a fact of life, like pregnancies and previously planned travel or other obligations.

Note that I posted up thread that I do think this situation is somewhat different if there is a training class or something similar that involves multiple people and which can't be rescheduled for one individual. In that case, yes, it's possible that OP might be in a position where they have to choose between the vacation and this job. On the other hand, it could be something where they have a training class starting every 3 months or something like that, and OP could be hired for the next class rather than the one that is coming up during their vacation.

And I do think that employer does also have some responsibility here too, and if they considered the start date to be critical, they certainly could have confirmed OP's availability during the interview process. So they may actually have some flexibility.

If not specifically asked about it, I agree with those who have said it's presumptuous for an applicant to bring it up during an interview, and the appropriate time would be when an offer is made. It's not at all unusual for a start date to be negotiated or for an employer to make the arrangements for someone to have the time off they need when they have something planned for shortly after they start a new job.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 11:25 AM
 
6,356 posts, read 3,484,004 times
Reputation: 5761
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
So what? I know women (several of them) who have gone though the interview process and been hired when they are pregnant, sometimes even 7 or 8 months along. They got hired, even with the employer knowing they would be taking several months off on maternity leave shortly after being hired. The employer wanted to find the person who was the right fit and was able to work around normal human things that are a fact of life, like pregnancies and previously planned travel or other obligations.

Note that I posted up thread that I do think this situation is somewhat different if there is a training class or something similar that involves multiple people and which can't be rescheduled for one individual. In that case, yes, it's possible that OP might be in a position where they have to choose between the vacation and this job. On the other hand, it could be something where they have a training class starting every 3 months or something like that, and OP could be hired for the next class rather than the one that is coming up during their vacation.

And I do think that employer does also have some responsibility here too, and if they considered the start date to be critical, they certainly could have confirmed OP's availability during the interview process. So they may actually have some flexibility.

If not specifically asked about it, I agree with those who have said it's presumptuous for an applicant to bring it up during an interview, and the appropriate time would be when an offer is made. It's not at all unusual for a start date to be negotiated or for an employer to make the arrangements for someone to have the time off they need when they have something planned for shortly after they start a new job.
I donít disagree with you.

Itís not the employerís job to ask every little personal detail. In my experience the more senior you are, and the tougher it is to fill the slot, the more common sense items are assumed, and the more flexibility the starting employee gets.

I agree that if the start date/first month was critical they should have stated that. I donít think they needed to confirm OPís availability, just as they shouldnít need to confirm that OP has transportation to/from work, is able to work a full day, etc. Table stakes.

I also agree that the interview isnít the place to mention vacation, unless the start date/cohort/etc. was deemed important and inflexible and communicated during the interview. Then the prospective employee needs to bring it up then.

Iíve started several roles with planned vacation coming up, and it was never an issue. I do recall for at least one of them discussing it during the final interview because I was asked about my start date.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 11:45 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,457,526 times
Reputation: 5695
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I donít disagree with you.

Itís not the employerís job to ask every little personal detail. In my experience the more senior you are, and the tougher it is to fill the slot, the more common sense items are assumed, and the more flexibility the starting employee gets.

I agree that if the start date/first month was critical they should have stated that. I donít think they needed to confirm OPís availability, just as they shouldnít need to confirm that OP has transportation to/from work, is able to work a full day, etc. Table stakes.

I also agree that the interview isnít the place to mention vacation, unless the start date/cohort/etc. was deemed important and inflexible and communicated during the interview. Then the prospective employee needs to bring it up then.

Iíve started several roles with planned vacation coming up, and it was never an issue. I do recall for at least one of them discussing it during the final interview because I was asked about my start date.
Me too. I would think it happens pretty frequently. No one works 24/365 and so vacations are expected.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 01:03 PM
 
59 posts, read 17,370 times
Reputation: 126
This is very common, it would be crazy to bring it up in the interview. You have to assume you don't have a job until you actually have the offer and start talking about start dates. HR and hiring managers almost always fail to stick to their own timeline on hiring, the offer may not even come in until the middle of the vacation.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: A tropical island
4,574 posts, read 4,442,197 times
Reputation: 11226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
This would be a HUGE red flag with me. The fact that you deliberately withheld this important information says things to me as a hiring manager that call into question your honesty and integrity. If that sounds harsh, welcome to corporate America. Iím sure most on here would disagree with that, but in the corporate world I came from thatís how it is.
Your best hope is to be honest right now and ask them to move your start date back if possible. If they refuse, find another job because this will follow you at this company. Ever heard of employees who have an asterisk by their name? It happens.

Your experience and your industry may be very different than the norm.

Both I and my husband have collectively interviewed hundreds of people throughout our careers. We would not consider it appropriate to discuss planned vacations during an interview. In fact, it would seem presumptuous and a waste of our time to discuss vacation plans of a person we might not even hire.

As the majority here have said, that kind of discussion comes after the offer, during negotiation of the details.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 03:30 PM
 
20,598 posts, read 16,652,763 times
Reputation: 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Sorry but I have a life that doesn't revolve around work. Any company that is going to hire me needs to understand, I don't eat, sleep & breathe work.


If that's what they want, bye Felicia.

Again, it's a group training program. They don't do it individually, they train as a group of all the new hires. If training starts 4/25 all new hires need to be there 4/25.



When I worked in home care for a hospital, you couldn't start before you went to orientation, which they had once per month. If I was going to miss the date due to a vacation, I probably would have lost the job, because I would have had to wait an extra month for orientation, and my department couldn't wait that long (I was hired due to someone being out on a medical disability). They'd have had to go to someone else not because they expected me to value work over my life, but because my vacation would simply have made the timing impossible to work around.
 
Old 04-16-2019, 03:31 PM
 
20,598 posts, read 16,652,763 times
Reputation: 38701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stugots for hire View Post
Yes, the evil hoards of HR women, I know it well. As HR is a bastion for incompetence and diversity hires, who have little or no accountability, there is real danger to getting on their bad side.

HR enforces corporate policy, they don't set it. I don't know why people think HR people have so much power, they don't.
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