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Old 04-16-2019, 01:06 PM
 
772 posts, read 714,818 times
Reputation: 1048

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Hey all,

I posted here several months back inquiring about start date negotiating with a new employer. While that is still what I'm hoping to do with my next job/in my job junt, I've come to accept that I probably won't have much wiggle room to work with in negotiations, so I'm considerering taking a much bigger risk, and taking a mini-sabbatical of sorts...

Here's my basic situation - relatively recent (last year) college grad (a business/finance program). Many of the jobs I'm interested in require/prefer knowledge of SQL, Tabelau, and such (not skills that the program taught us, but I was less sure of my next step during the program). Truthfully, several years of simultaneous full time work and school (with minimal time off) to get to where I'm at has also lead to pretty bad burnout as well...and I'm not so sure how well I will do in a new role right off the bat because of that.

To put it out there - I'm considering taking the plunge, and resigning from my job (with a proper 2 week notice) to get a 2-3 month or so break. I know conventional wisdom says this is a bad idea to do without a job lined up, but I'm simply not sure how else to give myself that kind of window of time for other things. Yes, I'd like to do some of the things people who take longer breaks from jobs do, such as traveling abroad, as well as spending some time with long distance family members, but I'd also like to use some of the time to develop said job skills, and be able to dedicate more time to it.

So, this brings me to the following questions - hoping for answers from those who have taken such a break, or know someone who has...

- How bad will a relatively short gap like this look on my resume? Especially if some of the time is used to develop relevant skills on a "full time" basis? How seriously will employers consider things like Coursera courses?
- If it does look that bad, how long might it take for me to find a job from the beginning stages of applying/networking? Will possessing "in-demand" skills help to an extent? I just need to get an idea if possible, to figure out how much time I can afford to not have an income for/plan as well as possible financially. If things did get ugly, I do have a bit of a support network for temporary housing and such (I would have to move away from where I am now), but I'd rather avoid that scenario - though I'd take temp/part time work of some sort to mitigate this too.

And before anyone asks - there isn't a silver of a chance in Hades of me getting this much unpaid time off from my current employer . Quitting/start date negotiation at another place is the only way it will happen.

Just want to think this through as much as possible before I make any big decisions - any advice is appreciated!
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Old 04-16-2019, 01:52 PM
 
16,797 posts, read 14,572,226 times
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My most recent supervisor did this. She left in October and is still on sabbatical. She has many contacts in her network and a great professional reputation so she knows that there is a job for her when she's ready.

However, unlike you, she is a senior professional with a long track record of success.
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Old 04-16-2019, 02:15 PM
 
1,571 posts, read 408,247 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flightoficarus87 View Post
To put it out there - I'm considering taking the plunge, and resigning from my job (with a proper 2 week notice) to get a 2-3 month or so break. I know conventional wisdom says this is a bad idea to do without a job lined up, but
This is a colossally bad idea. You want to learn new skills while working, do what many others do. Talk to management and ask for their support for you to do this. To allow time during the work day. You also have evenings and weekends too. If you want to take a workshop on this stuff, ask for them to pay for it.

See what they have to say. Cause people who quit their job to do what you are proposing come across as flakes to other employers. They won't look at it like a bold move. It will show that you can't multi-task doing that and that you can't handle what so many others do, which is work and attend classes part-time.

I manage a group. If someone came to me and said they want to take off 3 months unpaid to learn a new skill, I wouldn't approve it because it isn't necessary.
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Old 04-16-2019, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Fuquay Varina
4,592 posts, read 6,667,562 times
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The only way I would even consider this would be to enroll in a very good boot camp type class that will teach you what you are hoping to learn. Then you can put that on your resume and not be a gap.

you just have to consider what are you going to do between the class and a job. You have to do more than just the class.
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Old 04-16-2019, 03:01 PM
 
2,078 posts, read 607,501 times
Reputation: 2961
Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
This is a colossally bad idea. You want to learn new skills while working, do what many others do. Talk to management and ask for their support for you to do this. To allow time during the work day. You also have evenings and weekends too. If you want to take a workshop on this stuff, ask for them to pay for it.

See what they have to say. Cause people who quit their job to do what you are proposing come across as flakes to other employers. They won't look at it like a bold move. It will show that you can't multi-task doing that and that you can't handle what so many others do, which is work and attend classes part-time.

I manage a group. If someone came to me and said they want to take off 3 months unpaid to learn a new skill, I wouldn't approve it because it isn't necessary.
This is an old trite way of thinking and why corporate America is so riddled with issues as it is.

OP the bigger question is you said you're employed full-time. In what capacity? Is it a lower level role in your field? If so you won't really be caught in the catch-22 most recent grads are.
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Old 04-16-2019, 03:08 PM
 
772 posts, read 714,818 times
Reputation: 1048
Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
This is a colossally bad idea. You want to learn new skills while working, do what many others do. Talk to management and ask for their support for you to do this. To allow time during the work day. You also have evenings and weekends too. If you want to take a workshop on this stuff, ask for them to pay for it.

See what they have to say. Cause people who quit their job to do what you are proposing come across as flakes to other employers. They won't look at it like a bold move. It will show that you can't multi-task doing that and that you can't handle what so many others do, which is work and attend classes part-time.

I manage a group. If someone came to me and said they want to take off 3 months unpaid to learn a new skill, I wouldn't approve it because it isn't necessary.
It's not a position I'm in/company I'm at where I'd be able to get support for it - it's more or less a dead end job.

The quitting wouldn't be solely for this purpose though. But from what I'm gathering from this post, and the following, it sounds like career suicide...is that basically what I'm commiting by taking a much needed vacation, even if the time isn't all for that?

I feel like any new job is going to want me to start immediately following a 2 week notice w/my current employer, hence why I'm even considering this - the other option being to quit immediately upon a job offer to at least create a small window of time..
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Old 04-16-2019, 03:12 PM
 
772 posts, read 714,818 times
Reputation: 1048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
This is an old trite way of thinking and why corporate America is so riddled with issues as it is.

OP the bigger question is you said you're employed full-time. In what capacity? Is it a lower level role in your field? If so you won't really be caught in the catch-22 most recent grads are.
It's not in the field I wish to be in. It's actually the same job I was working while in school. A big part of why I'm still in it is that a lot of entry level positions I've looked into would either be a small pay cut, or at best a lateral move, with few exceptions. Hence why I want to keep working on skill development for better options.
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Old 04-16-2019, 03:15 PM
 
6,899 posts, read 7,306,042 times
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I certainly wouldn't advise quitting in order to learn new skills that you might be able to get your current employer to help you with -- by allowing you work time for classes, or paying for them.

BUT you want the time off for more than that...you ant to travel and spend time with family who don't leave nearby (whom you need to travel to go see.) You said you have a bit of burnout, and quite frankly feel you need a break.

Unfortunately, sometimes life doesn't provide that break from the rat-race without a cost.
I know three or four weeks is no where near 2 to 3 months. But I'd advise learning the desired skills now, while on this job....looking for a new job, and negotiating a new start date as far out in advance as you can. IF you can find an employer who'll wait a month (FOUR weeks, not five) that's usually as good as a person can negotiate. And you'll have your 4 weeks off.

I would never volunteer to be UNemployed and looking for a job.
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Old 04-17-2019, 08:30 PM
 
2,477 posts, read 708,263 times
Reputation: 3451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flightoficarus87 View Post
Here's my basic situation - relatively recent (last year) college grad (a business/finance program). Many of the jobs I'm interested in require/prefer knowledge of SQL, Tabelau, and such (not skills that the program taught us, but I was less sure of my next step during the program). Truthfully, several years of simultaneous full time work and school (with minimal time off) to get to where I'm at has also lead to pretty bad burnout as well...and I'm not so sure how well I will do in a new role right off the bat because of that.
Well, there are no entry level roles that require no experience (except mcjobs or sales) so how do you expect to get the jobs if you have no experience?

Quote:
To put it out there - I'm considering taking the plunge, and resigning from my job (with a proper 2 week notice) to get a 2-3 month or so break.
I know conventional wisdom says this is a bad idea to do without a job lined up,
OF COURSE it is a bad idea to quit a job without having another job lined up. Employers discriminate against the unemployed.


Quote:
but I'm simply not sure how else to give myself that kind of window of time for other things. Yes, I'd like to do some of the things people who take longer breaks from jobs do, such as traveling abroad, as well as spending some time with long distance family members,
Well, there are lots of adults who want to do things like that, but they don't. You know why? They grew up.

Quote:
but I'd also like to use some of the time to develop said job skills, and be able to dedicate more time to it.
This can be done after work, on a part time basis. In addition you can look for work and take advantage of being a "passive candidate" meaning you get a better chance of actually getting a new job.

So, you have a choice between

* Keep your job - being a passive candidate and doing school part time - and you have a better chance of your career taking off

OR

* you quit your job, rack up a ton of debt and then end up saying "would you like fries with that?"

Your decision.
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