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Old 04-22-2019, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27728

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Quote:
Originally Posted by move4ward View Post
Nothing wrong with quitting while on a PIP. Of the guys that I know that stayed for a PIP, they got fired and ended up unemployed for months. It really wrecked them, because other employers suspect that those guys were fired and wonder why nobody else is hiring them. When I left in the middle of the PIP, my new employer was paying $20k/yr more to work at larger company.

When I and my colleagues left for other jobs, we ended up making more money and happier except for a former supervisor that took a lower role just to support his family. He was running out of time and took the best offer available.

It's easier to find work, when you are still employed than not.
Agreed.

The only time I'd quit is if you had months of savings, felt very certain you had something close to in the bag or if it was severely impacting your mental health.

I was so nervous at that job and hated it so badly that I routinely vomited in the mornings before going in. It was truly awful and was really impacting my physical and mental health.
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Old 04-22-2019, 07:59 AM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,660 posts, read 3,687,967 times
Reputation: 19798
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AngryTaxPayer View Post
A PIP can backfire on the manager. If you have a proven track record that manager had damn well better have documentation. I had a stellar record at my work place and got placed under a real piece of work that went out of his way to be a richard. I didn't apply for it and for whatever reason they thought they were doing me a favor. I heard bad things about this one so documented from day one. His strategy was to break everyone that worked for him by demanding things that weren't normal requests, because well, he could. He pulled the PIP and I called his bluff with documentation and went to HR about it. He's still looking for work.
I wonder what is wrong with workplaces and managers that try so hard to break people. It's all politics these days. It seems even worse than 20 years ago. I'm glad now I work from home.
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Old 04-22-2019, 08:30 AM
 
1,565 posts, read 405,831 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AngryTaxPayer View Post
A PIP can backfire on the manager. If you have a proven track record that manager had damn well better have documentation. I had a stellar record at my work place and got placed under a real piece of work that went out of his way to be a richard. I didn't apply for it and for whatever reason they thought they were doing me a favor. I heard bad things about this one so documented from day one. His strategy was to break everyone that worked for him by demanding things that weren't normal requests, because well, he could. He pulled the PIP and I called his bluff with documentation and went to HR about it. He's still looking for work.
That is a different use for the PIP than most people experience, because that manager was acting entirely on his own for the PIP. So he lacked the support from other management in the process. Some twisted managers might be using it to make it appear they are squeezing more work and results out of their employees so their demands are taken more seriously. That still doesn't mean it won't end with a firing.

Usually when the PIP is used it's too encourage someone to find another job or simply resign out of some sort of humiliation. It is well orchestrated by the first line supervisor, that person's supervisor and HR. In fact, it starts with the supervisor's boss consulting with HR about how to get rid of someone or group of people for reasons that have nothing to do with performance. All the sudden the employee is led to feel they have fallen out of favor when they have been getting good reviews, good comments and no complaints about their work.

I know many people feel, how can they do this when things have been going fine at work and you have no indication there is real trouble. The range of why they do this is from wanting to replace an employee with someone with a different skill set to the need to reduce costs wanting to replace the employee with a cheaper employee. Sometimes management pays big bucks for someone to take a job, and then the role of the job needs and feel they can get the job done with a lower cost employee. The thing management likes about putting employees on a PIP, is that this usually stays very private out of shame. After all, it doesn't help you to tell others you are on a PIP. The PIP puts the Emphasis on it is the employee which is the problem, and not because management has another agenda. A layoff is very public and costly so employers want to avoid that. The bottom line is, if you can get an employee you want to resign it costs the company nothing, and they can then recruit for a replacement if that's what they want to do. Sometimes they don't replace the position for many months, which is another way of saving costs.

In a company, once you are on a PIP, finding another job within that company to transfer to it is near impossible because anyone within the company reviewing you application for another position is going to know the employee is on a PIP. And for all they know, this could be a problem employee and they don't want anything to do with it.

There is no question, this is a raw deal for anyone, but on the bright side it is better than being fired without any indication where you are suddenly out of a job. Management is not doing the PIP as a favor to the employee, it is all full of one-sided self-interests.
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Old 04-22-2019, 08:33 AM
 
1,565 posts, read 405,831 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Agreed.

The only time I'd quit is if you had months of savings, felt very certain you had something close to in the bag or if it was severely impacting your mental health.

I was so nervous at that job and hated it so badly that I routinely vomited in the mornings before going in. It was truly awful and was really impacting my physical and mental health.
So sorry you had to go through that. PIP or not, that applies to most situations if the job is truly horrible. But when being placed on a PIP, you have to asset the situation for what it is and act accordingly. Conscientious workers will still try to so what is asked of them when management has zero intention of keeping the employee in the job.
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Old 04-22-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
19,988 posts, read 18,983,271 times
Reputation: 5255
There are two performance improvement plans. One plan is you did something that needs to be corrected. The other plan is bogus and is a step toward separation. If you end up with bogus performance improvement plans for nothing, it is time to move on.
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Old 04-22-2019, 12:34 PM
 
2,765 posts, read 3,340,195 times
Reputation: 5480
This is the typical corporate BS where everyone deflects and doesn't talk to you. Step up your search for a new job and don't worry about taking time off for interviews. Hopefully it will pan out where you find a new job and you get fired from the old one at about the same time. You will get your severance and I would file for unemployment even if I would only get a day or two out of it before my new job started just so it would hit their unemployment rating. Start the new job, move on and be glad you didn't get stuck at that other job with the supervisor that is such a chicken **** she can't even discuss problems with you.
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Old 04-22-2019, 04:29 PM
 
24 posts, read 10,481 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Agreed.

The only time I'd quit is if you had months of savings, felt very certain you had something close to in the bag or if it was severely impacting your mental health.

I was so nervous at that job and hated it so badly that I routinely vomited in the mornings before going in. It was truly awful and was really impacting my physical and mental health.
I have about 3-4 months worth of savings. I just about threw up this morning before going in and felt like that the whole day. I heard my supervisor talking crap about me to the temp, but she was nice to my face. I just didn't give a reaction.
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Old 04-23-2019, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
651 posts, read 244,633 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifeisabeach21 View Post
I have about 3-4 months worth of savings. I just about threw up this morning before going in and felt like that the whole day. I heard my supervisor talking crap about me to the temp, but she was nice to my face. I just didn't give a reaction.
3-4 months of savings isn't a whole lot. A lot of companies take longer than that for their hiring processes.

Hang in there, and do what you can towards the PIP goals. As others have said, do everything you can to find a new job. It sounds like your supervisor is doing some dirty work, based on your first post.
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Old 04-23-2019, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
Reputation: 27728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lifeisabeach21 View Post
I have about 3-4 months worth of savings. I just about threw up this morning before going in and felt like that the whole day. I heard my supervisor talking crap about me to the temp, but she was nice to my face. I just didn't give a reaction.
If I were you, I'd be cutting expenses to the absolute bone in the interim. Build up as large of a war chest as possible. You could also potentially turn in a two-week notice at the start of the last week of the PIP. That could buy you another week's pay.
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Old 04-23-2019, 09:36 PM
 
1,565 posts, read 405,831 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianGC View Post
3-4 months of savings isn't a whole lot. A lot of companies take longer than that for their hiring processes.

Hang in there, and do what you can towards the PIP goals. As others have said, do everything you can to find a new job. It sounds like your supervisor is doing some dirty work, based on your first post.
Yes, I agree. People tend to grossly underestimate the amount of time that lapses to secure another job from their last day of work until your next start date. Employers in 2019 drag this out for months even after the first interview.
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