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Old 04-23-2019, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,632,423 times
Reputation: 27754

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Quote:
Originally Posted by G-fused View Post
The hiring of your friend (n=1) is really not very definitive - know what I mean?
Sure, you can't extrapolate one guy to the economy writ-large. With that said, there is pretty compelling evidence in favor of local candidates.
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Old 04-23-2019, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,654,765 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Is there something unique about YOU that 100 or 1000 others -who are already living in town X- don't have to offer?

Absent unique qualification or circumstance...
can you think of any reason why that would ever be expected to change?

There are a ton of ways to move.
But very few ways to do so with the guarantee of a job waiting for you.
And even fewer where the employer will also pay for the relocation.
A lot of jobs I was looking at are in small towns and rural areas. With that being said the competition would be next to none. However in the big cities, Iím not sure. In the field Iím looking at, I have the right college degree, but not the right work experience. The fields are related in a way, but not exactly. Having previous public health experience in a government might turn the tables in my favor over someone entry-level, with more specific degrees in this different subspecialty of public health and no experience, but itís hard to say. I have internships in the sub specialty and volunteer experience, but I donít think thatís enough.

The new field Iím looking at switching is growing but in certain key parts of the country, mostly the South, and in the two main hubs (DC and Atlanta). It would benefit my career if I was already a local in the South, especially the two hubs, but Iím not currently.

Also to JDawg my friend went to Cornell upstate, not sure if that has that same perspective or not.

And to joe, Iím a health inspector, which there is a ton of positions nationwide and places hiring. Even in my big city of Phoenix is constant turnover. If I wanted to stay as a health inspector and move, I could very easily as I am licensed nationally (few people are). Probably wouldnít be a paid relocation, unless I took a private sector food safety job.
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Old 04-23-2019, 09:03 PM
 
117 posts, read 39,389 times
Reputation: 123
Why would a company hire someone from three towns over if there is a breadline of fifty sharply dressed people outside their office? It’s worse than ever
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Old 04-23-2019, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,632,423 times
Reputation: 27754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
A lot of jobs I was looking at are in small towns and rural areas. With that being said the competition would be next to none. However in the big cities, Iím not sure. In the field Iím looking at, I have the right college degree, but not the right work experience. The fields are related in a way, but not exactly. Having previous public health experience in a government might turn the tables in my favor over someone entry-level, with more specific degrees in this different subspecialty of public health and no experience, but itís hard to say. I have internships in the sub specialty and volunteer experience, but I donít think thatís enough.

The new field Iím looking at switching is growing but in certain key parts of the country, mostly the South, and in the two main hubs (DC and Atlanta). It would benefit my career if I was already a local in the South, especially the two hubs, but Iím not currently.

Also to JDawg my friend went to Cornell upstate, not sure if that has that same perspective or not.

And to joe, Iím a health inspector, which there is a ton of positions nationwide and places hiring. Even in my big city of Phoenix is constant turnover. If I wanted to stay as a health inspector and move, I could very easily as I am licensed nationally (few people are). Probably wouldnít be a paid relocation, unless I took a private sector food safety job.
The problem with the small towns is that you are not only competing with current local residents, but also people in other areas who are natives to that area.

When I got my current position, I was interviewed by a senior director for a position in TN while I was in IN. While I had a strong background and they probably couldn't have found an equivalent candidate locally, the only reason I got the interview was because of my hometown ties. What I do is going to require 3-5 years of systems analyst experience for most people. That's not a deep pool here.

That director poached people from other parts of this large organization and had them trained up.
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Old 04-23-2019, 09:48 PM
 
1,565 posts, read 406,894 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I had a friend recently get a job in my city while living across the country (New York to Arizona), but at the time they were a recent graduate from an Ivy League. Their address was listed on the resume, and they still wanted to hire them.

Has the outlook changed towards hiring non-locals in recent times? Or are there only exceptions to the highly qualified? I remember reading a few years ago it was difficult if you didn't already live in the area, but people move all the time, so there's a way yes?

I myself am considering applying for jobs out of state, as my state doesn't hire too much in the field I want to switch into. Even if I chose to forego the address on my resume, my resume would show that I still currently work in a local government, which automatically gives away where I am located. I worry that even if I am qualified for positions in other parts of the country, and can fund my own move, that I will still get ignored because my address isn't local, and the name of my employer will give it away.
If you have the skills that are in demand and they have an opening, they don't care if you are local or not.

The only time they care if you are local is for jobs in major cities that are very expensive to live in, like New York City or San Francisco. Because too many people take the job and don't stay because they didn't like what was available to them to live there or they couldn't find anything to afford to buy that was to their liking.

Again, it depends on the skills and if they are in demand.

Do not play a game with putting a local address and phone number on a resume. Because they will think you are local, and will expect you to appear for an interview on short notice.

I've been involved with hiring for many years now, and no one has ever cared if someone was local or not. They have applied for the job, so they know where it is located and people move and change jobs, so it isn't an issue for high technology companies.

If you are trying to find a job in another state bagging groceries or to be a bank teller, yeah, they won't be interested in relocation costs.

As for relocation costs, they aren't that expensive for the company and they are a one-time cost, just like paying a headhunter for a new hire.

I've never paid for travel to interview. If the company wasn't vested enough to pay my travel expenses such as a plane ticket and hotel, then I'm not going to go interview there just so HR can make busy work.
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Old 04-24-2019, 05:42 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,357 posts, read 8,005,077 times
Reputation: 4771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I had a friend recently get a job in my city while living across the country (New York to Arizona), but at the time they were a recent graduate from an Ivy League. Their address was listed on the resume, and they still wanted to hire them.

Has the outlook changed towards hiring non-locals in recent times? Or are there only exceptions to the highly qualified? I remember reading a few years ago it was difficult if you didn't already live in the area, but people move all the time, so there's a way yes?

I myself am considering applying for jobs out of state, as my state doesn't hire too much in the field I want to switch into. Even if I chose to forego the address on my resume, my resume would show that I still currently work in a local government, which automatically gives away where I am located. I worry that even if I am qualified for positions in other parts of the country, and can fund my own move, that I will still get ignored because my address isn't local, and the name of my employer will give it away.
It's certainly more difficult, but it's not as much about non-locals being scrutinized vs. just being simpler to hire locally if the talent exists. At the end of the day, it's more about availability and simplicity.

This is no different than buying groceries at the local supermarket vs. driving to the next town to get the same thing. Of course, if there is something you want and it's only available in that store in the next town, you'll likely still decide to make that trip. Hence, the higher the position or less common the skill set, the more likely your candidate search will include a larger geographic location.
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:29 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,548 posts, read 62,302,713 times
Reputation: 32314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
A lot of jobs I was looking at are in small towns and rural areas.
I’m a health inspector... if I wanted to stay as a health inspector and move, I could very easily...
The new field I’m looking at switching is growing but ...
It would benefit my career if I was already a local...
When a post starts with this sort of specific scenario & understanding rather than the vague, broad and general...
the responses will be far more meaningful and maybe even specifically helpful too.
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Old 04-24-2019, 12:11 PM
 
8,981 posts, read 8,128,070 times
Reputation: 19502
Quote:
Originally Posted by rummage View Post
I've never paid for travel to interview. If the company wasn't vested enough to pay my travel expenses such as a plane ticket and hotel, then I'm not going to go interview there just so HR can make busy work.
To get paid hotel and travel, you have to have a strong specialty that is not easily available locally..
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Old 04-24-2019, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Central VT
13 posts, read 3,920 times
Reputation: 39
If you're not living in VT, if you're under age 35, not straight, and have a Master's degree or higher, you've got a
job with the State of VT. The State of VT government jobs are high-paying and have astounding benefits including a pension, loads of time off, and fantastic health benefits. Teachers in the state of VT are government employees and they, too, have unbelievably good benefits. Especially when you figure they work 40% less than non-government workers but earn as individuals the equivalent of what a two-income household earns. Fantastic if you can get in.
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Old 04-26-2019, 01:12 PM
 
469 posts, read 677,166 times
Reputation: 468
I've never heard of it being an issue, and have done it 3 times myself, as long as the non-local is the right person for the job.
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