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Old 04-22-2019, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,660,529 times
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I had a friend recently get a job in my city while living across the country (New York to Arizona), but at the time they were a recent graduate from an Ivy League. Their address was listed on the resume, and they still wanted to hire them.

Has the outlook changed towards hiring non-locals in recent times? Or are there only exceptions to the highly qualified? I remember reading a few years ago it was difficult if you didn't already live in the area, but people move all the time, so there's a way yes?

I myself am considering applying for jobs out of state, as my state doesn't hire too much in the field I want to switch into. Even if I chose to forego the address on my resume, my resume would show that I still currently work in a local government, which automatically gives away where I am located. I worry that even if I am qualified for positions in other parts of the country, and can fund my own move, that I will still get ignored because my address isn't local, and the name of my employer will give it away.
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Old 04-23-2019, 12:20 AM
 
8,984 posts, read 8,133,403 times
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Two reasons:

1--They may be only hiring local, as a lot out of state hires want company to pay moving expenses, so hire local if available to save money.

2--After being hired a lot of new hires change their mind when they realize what expense or life style changes the move will cost them and do not move and start work, and not a problem with local hires.

They really hire out of area, if there are no local qualified candidates. When there a surplus of local candidates, they will hire local.
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Old 04-23-2019, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,685 posts, read 17,651,107 times
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It's always an uphill struggle if you're not local and don't have any particular skill for which a company would pay to move you.

With that said, it absolutely can be and is done. I've moved from Tennessee to Iowa, Iowa to Tennessee, Tennessee to Indiana, and Indiana back to Tennessee with jobs in hand each time. I'd always recommend that, in your cover letter, you specify that you're willing to move on your own dime. You may want to get a PO box number and a number local to the area in which you are applying.

It cuts both ways. Some companies don't really recruit outside the local area, or there isn't anything "special" enough about them that would attract highly skilled outsiders. I live and work in a small metro in northeast TN. It would be very difficult to attract outsiders from major metros with the amenities of this area and local pay rates.
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Old 04-23-2019, 07:00 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,556 posts, read 62,337,179 times
Reputation: 32336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I am considering applying for jobs out of state...
I worry that even if I am qualified for positions in other parts of the country, and can fund my own move,
that I will still get ignored because my address isn't local...
Is there something unique about YOU that 100 or 1000 others -who are already living in town X- don't have to offer?

Quote:
Has the outlook changed towards hiring non-locals in recent times?
Absent unique qualification or circumstance...
can you think of any reason why that would ever be expected to change?

Quote:
...but people move all the time, so there's a way yes?
There are a ton of ways to move.
But very few ways to do so with the guarantee of a job waiting for you.
And even fewer where the employer will also pay for the relocation.

Last edited by MrRational; 04-23-2019 at 07:09 AM..
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Old 04-23-2019, 09:28 AM
 
9,532 posts, read 13,480,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I had a friend recently get a job in my city while living across the country (New York to Arizona), but at the time they were a recent graduate from an Ivy League. Their address was listed on the resume, and they still wanted to hire them.

Has the outlook changed towards hiring non-locals in recent times? Or are there only exceptions to the highly qualified? I remember reading a few years ago it was difficult if you didn't already live in the area, but people move all the time, so there's a way yes?

I myself am considering applying for jobs out of state, as my state doesn't hire too much in the field I want to switch into. Even if I chose to forego the address on my resume, my resume would show that I still currently work in a local government, which automatically gives away where I am located. I worry that even if I am qualified for positions in other parts of the country, and can fund my own move, that I will still get ignored because my address isn't local, and the name of my employer will give it away.
I'm sure the Ivy had something to do it.


Also many other locales like to hire people who have worked in NYC, largely b/c we're a working culture … it's cut-throat here and NYers don't mess around when it comes to work … NYers are hardworking and dedicated b/c you really have to be if you are going to make it here. That work ethic transfers in a lot of cases when people move. Companies want that.


I am not saying people in other areas don't work hard but other places have a more laid-back culture. NYC does not and life largely centers around people's jobs.
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Old 04-23-2019, 02:04 PM
 
9,803 posts, read 17,027,562 times
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Yes, there is a way and, yes, it is difficult. I would guess that your friend's Alma Mater (and, possibly, his degree field) had a lot to do with it. If you don't have anything to offer that the locals don't, don't expect anyone to be impressed with what you have to offer. The bigger question is what you do for local government? The assistant city manager looking to get their first city manager position will probably score interviews. The receptionist for public works probably will not. The higher the position, and the more uncommon the skill, the greater the chance to land an out of state job.
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Old 04-23-2019, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
651 posts, read 246,282 times
Reputation: 1560
Spot on responses mentioning desirable skill sets. Even if a company is not paying relocation benefits, it's still less of a risk for them to hire local first. Also, it's a heck of a lot easier to set up interviews.

I'm in a very desirable field and moved with jobs lined up from FL to IL (on my dime), IL to TN (company's dime), and TN to NC (also company's dime).
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Old 04-23-2019, 03:36 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,736 posts, read 3,712,462 times
Reputation: 19870
I don't blame employers for wanting to hire only locally.
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Old 04-23-2019, 07:03 PM
 
5,349 posts, read 7,237,230 times
Reputation: 5110
It depends. I know in my field, we do hire non-locals if they truly appear to be the best candidate. But I do think it is a factor - they are more likely to turn the job down, based on experience, and sometimes we can get more information about a local candidate to increase our confidence in making a decision. Further, an in-person interview also evokes more confidence than an Internet one from both sides - better feel of what all are getting into, at least we 'feel' so psychologically. A local also sometimes has more of an 'in' on understanding local issues, details about our company, etc., that can help them prepare for an interview a bit better in some cases. So I believe that if rankings come out close, the non-local could be at a disadvantage sometimes. But if you knock it out of the park, we'll go with you happily.
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Old 04-23-2019, 07:17 PM
 
5,344 posts, read 5,319,169 times
Reputation: 12531
The hiring of your friend (n=1) is really not very definitive - know what I mean?
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