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Old 04-25-2019, 08:24 AM
 
780 posts, read 204,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
B/c when I apply for a job that wants 10-15 years experience and some 27 year old gets it, what am I to think? Employers say they want this or that, but really they want to hire the person who will cost them the least.
How do you know who gets the job? I'm never privy to that information after I move on from a position I didn't get. Do you have insiders who are filling you in on this info?
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:38 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,450,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
How do you know who gets the job? I'm never privy to that information after I move on from a position I didn't get. Do you have insiders who are filling you in on this info?
it's easy to figure it out on LinkedIn (but this only works if the candidate has actually updated their profile).


Go into the co page. Click 'see employees @ **company name**' … it will show you all the people who work there or who have worked there. Look for the person who job title matches what you applied for. Look @ their hire date.


That is how you figure it out. If they haven't updated their profile then you cannot possibly know unless like you said, you have insiders filling you in.


Stalkerish maybe. But I want to know who are getting the jobs I am passed up for so I can see what it is they have that I don't (do they have a masters, do they have some kind of certification, have they worked at better companies than I have etc etc)


The internet leads to finding out many many things
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:39 AM
 
780 posts, read 204,145 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
it's easy to figure it out on LinkedIn (but this only works if the candidate has actually updated their profile).


Go into the co page. Click 'see employees @ **company name**' … it will show you all the people who work there or who have worked there. Look for the person who job title matches what you applied for. Look @ their hire date.


That is how you figure it out. If they haven't updated their profile then you cannot possibly know unless like you said, you have insiders filling you in.


Stalkerish maybe. But I want to know who are getting the jobs I am passed up for so I can see what it is they have that I don't (do they have a masters, do they have some kind of certification etc etc)


The internet leads to finding out many many things
And you know for sure that is the same job req you applied for? I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm just curious.

The only other thing I could say if you're being undercut by younger, cheaper labor is that maybe it's not you, but the organization who is subscribing to a philosophy to hire younger and cheaper for budgeting reasons. I've worked at some companies who only would want to hire experienced workers, and had little interest in developing people up. Just different philosophies. These people are not only cheaper in terms of salary, but they are cheaper to provide health insurance benefits to. That's something people never consider when their employer is in charge of paying the brunt of their insurance premium each month.
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:47 AM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,450,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
And you know for sure that is the same job req you applied for? I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm just curious.

The only other thing I could say if you're being undercut by younger, cheaper labor is that maybe it's not you, but the organization who is subscribing to a philosophy to hire younger and cheaper for budgeting reasons. I've worked at some companies who only would want to hire experienced workers, and had little interest in developing people up. Just different philosophies. These people are not only cheaper in terms of salary, but they are cheaper to provide health insurance benefits to. That's something people never consider when their employer is in charge of paying the brunt of their insurance premium each month.
Yeah b/c I can see the postings on the company website and I applied directly to the listing on the website and that is the same job the person got.


Yes it has to do with money most likely. My background is pretty solid. I'm not the BEST person out there but when a much younger gets the job, you have to suspect it's due to age (aka money).
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:49 AM
 
780 posts, read 204,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Yeah b/c I can see the postings on the company website and I applied directly to the listing on the website and that is the same job the person got.


Yes it has to do with money most likely. My background is pretty solid. I'm not the BEST person out there but when a much younger gets the job, you have to suspect it's due to age (aka money).
In that case, consider it a blessing in disguise. If they're being cheap on labor, that's probably not the only thing they are going to be cheap about.
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Old 04-25-2019, 08:49 AM
 
Location: SC
8,791 posts, read 5,659,431 times
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Leave it off.

It is one more thing that a company may use to initially exclude you - without even considering your resume. It does not matter if they will ultimately figure it out or not; a resume's job is NOT to get you a gig, but to get you past the initial screenings to the point were someone with eyes and knowledge of your fields and its details and how well your resume jibes with the requirement (instead of a computer or an knowledgeable HR person) can look at you.

My resume does not include address, city, or state, family information like marital status, likes or dislikes or any non job-specific information; just my name and phone number and I still get requests for interviews even though I am close to sixty and retired. The only dates listed on my resume are for the jobs I held.
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Old 04-25-2019, 09:02 AM
ERH
 
Location: Cary, NC
1,145 posts, read 1,637,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Yes it has to do with money most likely. My background is pretty solid. I'm not the BEST person out there but when a much younger gets the job, you have to suspect it's due to age (aka money).
You are right -- it's primarily about the $$$$$. The other factor we see with ageism is a culture thing; are you the "right fit" for the culture they have or the one they're trying to build.

In my work with C-level executives, I get to spend a couple of hours on the phone with them and, whenever possible, I work in questions about their hiring philosophies around older team members. Most agree that age is not the issue; it's the mindset.

If you have someone entrenched in "legacy thinking" (we've always done it this way) who's not interested in changing their mindset, they are often viewed as an impediment to change and eliminated from the organization. If you present yourself as someone who embraces change and can acclimate (go with the flow), you will be viewed as a much more valuable part of the organization, regardless of age.

Finally, if you're a person who already knows everything about everything and don't believe there's anything new to learn, you're not going to be welcomed to the team.
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Old 04-25-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
6,540 posts, read 7,806,331 times
Reputation: 15983
I recently updated my resume. As I was doing that, I thought about the dates of my degrees/graduation and considered removing them given my mid-50's age. I left the dates on there. The reality is that most (?) companies require one to fill out an online application first. Very often one can't get through the application without including degree dates.

Many jobs also require background checks--at least in the self-employed contractor world. My most recent background check required my degree transcripts. It's on there.
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Old 04-25-2019, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,233 posts, read 1,418,186 times
Reputation: 1681
I graduated college in the decade that started with "9". Even so, I have observed some fairly obvious age discrimination.

At a previous company (Fortune 100), we received as an unsolicited transfer, a "seasoned" manager from another department. This guy, who was in his 50s, immediately started griping about how old everyone in my department was (this was an IT division, both technical and active, using legacy software). My people were between 35 and 60; I was the youngest manager. Nobody was obviously old, at least by appearance -- my team was a professional group of mostly male IT grads from the 1970s-1980s. This transferred manager still wore a suit and lace-ups everyday (I had already 'transitioned' to nerd chic -- jeans, blazer, t-shirt, loafers).

I'll never forget him bringing up his age obsession at every single meeting: that we needed to get rid of the old wood and hire "new college graduates." He was like a broken record. We mostly used legacy software that had not been taught in college curricula in 20+ years.

One time, he elaborated that our bonus structure as managers would be "enriched" if we replaced expensive people with cheaper people (regardless if they could do the work). I pointed out that the bonuses were not determined by departmental budgets, but rather structured by corporate HR, based mainly on enterprise financial performance.

I was in my late 30s at the time, and I mentioned to him several times that he needed to cool his temper on this issue as it was possibly not legal, and certainly not advisable, to announce his recruitment discrimination objectives. Sometimes leadership (C-level) people would listen silently on our departmental conference calls. I don't think he even realized it. (I only knew because our CFO, who was my neighbor in suburbia, divulged this after a few glasses of vino).

Mr. Age Discrimination was gone within a year -- let go with several other 50+ managers. Not sure if he ever worked again :-O
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Old 04-25-2019, 09:41 AM
 
3,767 posts, read 2,126,346 times
Reputation: 10273
Truly a "race to the bottom" isn't it"

Education/Skills/Appears old =Bad
Young willing to work cheap-Good
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