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Old 04-25-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,001,676 times
Reputation: 12774

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tolovefromANFIELD View Post
Cost discrimination is not the same as age discrimination. If the market bid is lower than your ask is, then you're the one who is out of touch with the market. Therefore, lower your bid, and magically "age discrimination" will disappear.
Nope.

I am generally looking for a 'downscale' position and always make it plain that I am content with the salary range being offered, despite experience etc. that could bring me much higher compensation for a senior/supervisory/management slot. I gently emphasize at every opportunity that maximum compensation (either starting or in early years) is not my concern.

Doesn't make any difference. They still hire some 30yo guppie with half my horsepower... and probably lose her when she doesn't get a 10% raise at every turn.
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Old 04-25-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: In a city within a state where politicians come to get their PHDs in Corruption
1,467 posts, read 1,131,272 times
Reputation: 2970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Nope.

I am generally looking for a 'downscale' position and always make it plain that I am content with the salary range being offered, despite experience etc. that could bring me much higher compensation for a senior/supervisory/management slot. I gently emphasize at every opportunity that maximum compensation (either starting or in early years) is not my concern.

Doesn't make any difference. They still hire some 30yo guppie with half my horsepower... and probably lose her when she doesn't get a 10% raise at every turn.
The response wasn't meant for you. She clearly said that she "won't work for the pay some 20 year old kid would".

And your case isn't any more "special" or any more "age discriminatory" than hers. Employers don't want to hire someone who's willing to step down, because they think you'll leave as soon as something better comes along. We can argue whether or not that assumption is accurate, but it isn't age discrimination, it's heuristics.
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Old 04-25-2019, 12:49 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,436,132 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthofHere View Post
He and your a she, I would lean more to sexism then ageism given you are only in your late 30's and the job was looking for someone with at least 10 years experience. Is this a one time thing or is there a pattern? Did you interview for the job or just not get called?
I interviewed and was not offered the job.


Yes, I suspect being a male had something to do with it as well.


Companies are not going to hire a female of child-bearing age over a younger male or even any male for that matter. I know it happens, I don't live under a rock.


Age discrimination / sexism, IDK what it is but it's very real. I know it is not me. I have gotten to 2nd/3rd round interviews so I know co's like me what it comes down to is saving money, perhaps keeping the workforce young, OR keeping people who will not leave to go have a baby.


(Meanwhile, I am not having kids).
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:20 PM
 
780 posts, read 202,631 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
I interviewed and was not offered the job.


Yes, I suspect being a male had something to do with it as well.


Companies are not going to hire a female of child-bearing age over a younger male or even any male for that matter. I know it happens, I don't live under a rock.


Age discrimination / sexism, IDK what it is but it's very real. I know it is not me. I have gotten to 2nd/3rd round interviews so I know co's like me … what it comes down to is saving money, perhaps keeping the workforce young, OR keeping people who will not leave to go have a baby.


(Meanwhile, I am not having kids).
I wouldn't take any of it personally. People get passed over all the time for a whole slew of odd reasons. We recently interviewed and hired a Senior Analyst. One of my co-workers, who's kind of a bleep, "expressed concern over the fact that he didn't complete his actuarial exam; that it demonstrated a lack of drive".

Thankfully our manager knew better than to sum this candidate up based on that, and fortunately this co-worker is not a decision maker. Her concerns were nitpicky and irrelevant to the job requirements. But had she been the hiring manager, that would have been one of the reasons he wasn't hired: he didn't finish a rigorous exam process that wasn't even required for the job.

Sometimes it's about money. Sometimes it's about fit. Sometimes it's just downright trivial.
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,001,676 times
Reputation: 12774
Quote:
Originally Posted by tolovefromANFIELD View Post
The response wasn't meant for you. She clearly said that she "won't work for the pay some 20 year old kid would".
Okay.

But my case is unusual; I simply don't need (the headaches associated with) a 6-figure salary. In her case, an employer should pay for what they get, not expect someone with 20 years of experience to work at the same comp as someone still playing with the stapler. That companies are content to have a TO filled with overgrown kids who can't find their ass with both hands, over the ROI of more experienced employees... well, just another symptom that this super-wonderful job market is all facade.
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:57 PM
 
Location: In a city within a state where politicians come to get their PHDs in Corruption
1,467 posts, read 1,131,272 times
Reputation: 2970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Okay.

But my case is unusual; I simply don't need (the headaches associated with) a 6-figure salary. In her case, an employer should pay for what they get, not expect someone with 20 years of experience to work at the same comp as someone still playing with the stapler. That companies are content to have a TO filled with overgrown kids who can't find their ass with both hands, over the ROI of more experienced employees... well, just another symptom that this super-wonderful job market is all facade.
Your argument depends on an assumption that an employee with 20 years of experience adds more value than the one with 10 years. Often times that's not the case. Law of diminishing returns applies to many positions.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,001,676 times
Reputation: 12774
Quote:
Originally Posted by tolovefromANFIELD View Post
Your argument depends on an assumption that an employee with 20 years of experience adds more value than the one with 10 years. Often times that's not the case. Law of diminishing returns applies to many positions.
You've selectively interpreted what I said. I didn't say years alone; I said experience.

Five years or twenty probably make no difference in accounting or a cereal boxing line. But accumulated experience and capabilities add worker value in many positions, mostly creative, developmental or interpretive types.

There's also something to be said for demonstrated ability and reliability; an employee you can actually turn your back on is worth a lot more than one who demands continual management.
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Old 04-25-2019, 02:43 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,436,132 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
I wouldn't take any of it personally. People get passed over all the time for a whole slew of odd reasons. We recently interviewed and hired a Senior Analyst. One of my co-workers, who's kind of a bleep, "expressed concern over the fact that he didn't complete his actuarial exam; that it demonstrated a lack of drive".

Thankfully our manager knew better than to sum this candidate up based on that, and fortunately this co-worker is not a decision maker. Her concerns were nitpicky and irrelevant to the job requirements. But had she been the hiring manager, that would have been one of the reasons he wasn't hired: he didn't finish a rigorous exam process that wasn't even required for the job.

Sometimes it's about money. Sometimes it's about fit. Sometimes it's just downright trivial.
One time I went to an interview through a headhunter so I was in communication with her about the feedback and everything.


I met with 6 people. 5/6 wanted to hire me. The 6th one (who is apparently a ridiculous hard-a$$ & also apparently the decision-maker of the group) said I seemed nervous and that is why she didn't hire me.


Ummm are people not supposed to be nervous @ interviews? Did she just expect me to wing it?


I found it very odd. I didn't get the job.
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Old 04-25-2019, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,753 posts, read 1,012,647 times
Reputation: 3013
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Big need. Most companies do not hire people with out a degree. Just put the name of the college, your degree and major, honors if any. Graduation date? Leave it off.

With employment, as others have suggested, nothing older than ten years.

Actually, I think you are at that sweet spot in terms of age. Not just out of school, and no impending health problems.
I wasn't saying take the degree off, just the grad year.
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Old 04-26-2019, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,767 posts, read 4,825,615 times
Reputation: 19387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Late 30's. Starting to experience age discrimination.


Should I remove my college graduation year from my resume & let them figure it out?


I have 15 years experience so I am not sure what difference it will make anyway. Sure they will know I am not 22 if I have been working for 15 years.


How does one handle this?
Age discrimination in your 30's? I don't think that's the issue.
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