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Old 04-28-2019, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,419 posts, read 7,934,902 times
Reputation: 53550

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I never wanted a high flying career. Why do people go into them? To make good money maybe. I didn't need a high flying career to do that. We were financially independent in our mid 40's with regular jobs. The corporate world can be a soul crushing toxic environment and if the end game is money? There are easier better ways.
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Old 04-28-2019, 11:54 AM
 
1,228 posts, read 1,498,219 times
Reputation: 822
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I never wanted a high flying career. Why do people go into them? To make good money maybe. I didn't need a high flying career to do that. We were financially independent in our mid 40's with regular jobs. The corporate world can be a soul crushing toxic environment and if the end game is money? There are easier better ways.
3 reasons:
- a lot of money.
- talented people want to make something of their talent, creating some world leading product/service, or scientific discoveries.
- prestigious positions available in several levels of hierarchy.
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Old 04-28-2019, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,871 posts, read 1,263,606 times
Reputation: 6464
Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I never wanted a high flying career. Why do people go into them? To make good money maybe. I didn't need a high flying career to do that. We were financially independent in our mid 40's with regular jobs. The corporate world can be a soul crushing toxic environment and if the end game is money? There are easier better ways.
There are a lot of reasons that people might choose to go into a high flying career and just as many reasons that people might not.

I was moving up through promotions based on my skills and went back to college then started advancing into management. I am a relatively laid back type B personality and had no desire to spend my life at the office or engage in cut throat competitions. I enjoy management in that I can help others develop and make a positive impact on my location but it's not a power trip for me and I could care less about titles/prestige. I don't work long hours on a regular basis and don't expect it from my team--if you are regularly spending 12 hours in the office then you either are lacking a life outside of work are not efficient.

I do agree that there are many corporate environments which are toxic and this is why I won't ever work in a corporate location. I am quite happy in manufacturing environments and like my role as a division HR manager since I am based at a manufacturing location. I could never see working at our corporate location; too many toxic politics and it's far too uptight and has the 'live to work' mentality.

There's nothing wrong at all with defining one's life by factors outside of life. In fact, I wish that more people saw the value of having a life outside of work. There is also nothing wrong with a "regular job" as long as it is one that you enjoy and allows you the time to have a life outside of work.

Glad that you have found this balance because a lot of people struggle with it.
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Old 04-28-2019, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,173 posts, read 3,015,053 times
Reputation: 13858
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianGC View Post
My situation might not be as extreme. I'm currently in engineering on the manufacturing side for the past several years. It's a great path if you're interested in managing, but it's not so great if you're looking for a deep technical route. Through a combination of dumb luck, not knowing what I wanted in my 20s, and a high demand for this field, I've made multiple job changes that increased my salary substantially. However, it comes with a lot of drama, cleaning up messes and obnoxious fire-fighting, people making decisions based on "feelings", people throwing their last-minute problems on you, getting blamed for crap you can't control without god-like abilities, and management-lite "people-project" tasks. It wasn't until the past 2-3 years I realized how much I hate it and how far behind it puts you from a technical standpoint.

I was recently approached by my boss to pursue an open manager job....nah, no thank you lol. For a while, I've been looking to make a switch to a more technical role on the design/R&D side of engineering, and I'm not deviating from that goal. If I wanted to climb the ladder to management in my current path, the door is certainly open. However, I've gotten a too much of a taste of that nonsense and feel no need to go any further. Our finances are fine as-is, even if I need to take a pay-cut to get the career I want.

I took a job with a large national/international company, where I needed to use many of the skills and knowledge I'd developed in my education and previous jobs. I did very well and was being trained for a position that required testing and certification, which needed to be filled by one person in each of their offices.

But then, I hit a dead-end with that company, because they wanted to promote me to being a manager of an office in a smaller city. I turned down two similar offers in different cities, because I didn't want to leave my home or to live in the backwards cultures in those other places. So that finished me, as far as my future with that company was concerned. It was either up or out with them. The amount and quality of assignments they were giving me was diminishing, so I left and never looked back. If I'd played by their rules and taken a series of management jobs with them, I probably would have made very good money, but I wasn't willing to leave everything behind, that I value in my very unique hometown. No amount of prestige or money I would get from any job, would take the place of the life I enjoy here, doing simpler and more independent things.

Last edited by Steve McDonald; 04-28-2019 at 10:44 PM..
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Old 04-29-2019, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
12,545 posts, read 4,242,077 times
Reputation: 9870
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Student debt is 100% optional. Many people have successful lives without debt.
Really?

Explain.
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Old 04-29-2019, 04:41 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 404,523 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerGeek40 View Post
Really?

Explain.
Sure, they don't go to college. So they don't have any student debt. Doesn't that sound just wonderful?
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:16 AM
 
11,145 posts, read 8,555,795 times
Reputation: 28147
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerGeek40 View Post
Really?

Explain.
Every college I know of takes cash and credit cards for payment. It is not the schools' fault if folks don't have the available cash AND insist on attending that school. Getting loans in a personal choice.

Folks have other options like attending a local community college for two years, live at home, work full time and pay cash. Maybe use the Pell grant to help. Many companies offer tuition reimbursement including Walmart, McDonald's, and Starbucks.

For the last two years, find an inexpensive local school, live at home, use tuition reimbursement, Pell grant, and savings to pay cash. No debt or very little.

Also, be willing to stretch out your schooling past four years to keep pace with ones savings and ability to pay cash. Better to get the degree in 5-6 years and be debt free.

Makes sense, right? Debt is 100% optional.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:52 AM
 
6,885 posts, read 7,292,401 times
Reputation: 9791
Quote:
How old were you when you made the move back home? I'm in a similar situation.
56 and 10 months.
Left the job in April, turned 57 in June.

I had dreams of leaving but it was only a dream. I had accepted hating my job until 65.
Then out of the blue the company wanted to down size a division (or providence brought brought it to me ), and 28 of us got severance offers, with the option to stay OR go. They wanted to cut 16 out of 28 slots. IF, IF enough people didn't take the offer....THEN they would have cut from the bottom by seniority. An HR person said they weren't sure they get 16 volunteers. Little did they know, people jumped on that offer so fast, they had more than 16 people who wanted the offer. Sadly, one of us had to stay. Due to a scheduling hick-up, didn't get her paperwork in, in time.

My financial situation, and a fortunate set of circumstances, (paid off house and car, no debt) allowed me to take the offer.

Oh, I knew I'd still have to work somewhere until 65, because I didn't get any retiree health insurance. But I also knew I could make it on making a LOT less money. And I really, really wanted to be back home. Now I see family or friends almost daily. That part has been great!

I'm now making less than HALF of what I made before, at a job I hate -- but one which does have great benefits, and other plusses -- like a one mile commute! The job has been the most challenging trade off so far, even more so than the money. But I'm job hunting. and once I get a job where I want to sit tight until retirement, no more job hunting me!

---------

(As an aside, the severance/downsizing situation had me wondering, as execs REALLY, REALLY , REALLY that clueless about how many people who work for them hate being there, an would leave in a heartbeat if they got a severance offer. Our in house HR person actually said she wasn't sure they'd get enough people to take the offer. I looked at her like she was crazy. We had 2 weeks to turn in our paperwork Some people signed and turned their packets that day!)

Last edited by selhars; 04-29-2019 at 07:01 AM..
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,598,460 times
Reputation: 27693
I've never had a high flying career. I don't want to live in the pressure cooker that I see my management in.
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:29 AM
 
11,145 posts, read 8,555,795 times
Reputation: 28147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I've never had a high flying career. I don't want to live in the pressure cooker that I see my management in.
You don't have to go into management. Many senior level individual contributor roles.
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