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Old 04-29-2019, 02:44 PM
 
811 posts, read 1,742,617 times
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I'm currently looking for full time in a variety of areas over the country.
I'm concerned by being 'out of market' for many, I am being passed over for consideration.

In all of the markets I am applying, I have friends/family, and was wondering if it would be beneficial for me, if prompted for an address, to just give their local address (as I have their permission).

On the plus side, this may allow me the opportunity to interview when I would have been passed over, but on the downside I'm not sure if an employer would see this as deceiving and worse, consider me a liar.

If approached for an interview, I would inquire if it would be in person or over the phone, and I would emphasize that relocation in short order would not be of concern as I have to place to stay.
Basically:

1) Is this worth a shot?
2) What should I say if asked to interview?
-The truth, that I am seeking to relocate nearby, I have friend/family I can stay with?

Thanks.
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Old 04-29-2019, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,591 posts, read 3,019,935 times
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I don't remember the last time I heard of someone being hired from out of area, except in fairly elite executive or on-fire job segments. Many of the local jobs I apply for specifically ask for local-only; I just had one app rejected because I'm not in the same smallish city, which is a 15-minute drive from me.

It's hard enough to run the gauntlet when you don't have a hurdle like needing relocation, paid or not.
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Old 04-29-2019, 03:00 PM
 
7,959 posts, read 9,702,165 times
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So, you are prepared to spend exorbitant amounts of money to fly around the country with little notice?
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Old 04-29-2019, 08:09 PM
 
2,419 posts, read 687,207 times
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Why are you "out of the market"?

Are you currently employed in your field? If yes, you're a "passive candidate" and are coveted by employers.

If you're not employed at all, you're discriminated against for not being employed.
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Old 04-30-2019, 03:32 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,881 posts, read 8,657,053 times
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I think most employers want to deal only with local candidates, and they differ only with regard to how aggressively they protect themselves from non-local candidates trying to circumvent their preventive efforts in that regard.

If you really want to get a job in another city, your best bet is to be just as aggressive in protecting yourself from having your non-local status found out.

That means having a local, home address where you want to work. (Find a friend who will let you "move in" with them, at least on paper.) It means adjusting all your public online profiles (LinkedIn, Indeed, etc.) so that it looks like you're living currently living local to the job you want and working remotely at the job you have. It means never saying anything that would lead a prospective employer to believe that you aren't already living local to the new job.

That means that you would never indicate that you need to be interviewed by telephone or video because you don't live nearby. That's a sure-fire disqualifier for most of these employers.

Don't lie, at least not directly. Giving a local address is what is necessary to be considered for most jobs. The behavior of employers forces us to do that. However, never say to an interviewer that you live locally. If they ask you to come in for an interview in a few hours, then either do so (if practicable) or say you won't be able to do so, and suggest perhaps the next day (assuming that is practicable). If the question comes up ("You seem to work in X, but live in Y - how do you manage that") be honest but cagey ("I have a place I stay in X until I find a local job [in Y].") End of discussion. If the interviewer starts digging into things like which city you personal property is located, where your car is registered, etc., then [a] they're being inappropriate, and [b] you've lost the "game".

Once you have an offer, and they have you fill out an internal application as a formality, be sure to indicate your current home address.

And don't forget that this is a risk you're taking. It is a smaller risk than being upfront about where you live, but eventually it may blow up on you. If it does, you can look them in the eye and say honestly that using a local address on your resume and in LinkedIn is "generally necessary to be considered seriously for a local position." Don't try to be more creative about defending your reasoning. Keep it succinct like that, and consistent - don't apologize; don't elaborate and don't put forward any excuses.

And be prepared to be without any job, should they be upset about the prevarication.
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Old 04-30-2019, 05:30 AM
 
6,876 posts, read 7,273,507 times
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I don't think most employers will dig thaaaaat deep.

And IF, IF you're asked about it, verbally, NOT in a casual way -- but specifically in such a way that you suspect they already know and have caught you......I still on't know that I'd say: "using a local address on your resume and in LinkedIn is "generally necessary to be considered seriously for a local position." THAT is essence is admitting you lied. In essence it's saying, "I had to do that or you wouldn't have even given me an interview."

If the local address really IS a family member, and you really are familiar with the area, and you really have stayed there from time to time (them being family and all) -- I might say I am here local much of the time, with family here I've been spitting my time with my other address, but I definitely consider myself local to the area."
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:13 AM
 
2,419 posts, read 687,207 times
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Employers discriminate against people who are not in the local area.

If you want to move to a particular area, move there first, put that on your resume, and then apply. Otherwise, you're screwed.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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I'm from Tennessee, but landed an opportunity in Iowa and in Indiana out of state.

I was forthcoming with that I wasn't local. I think the big factor is that those locations aren't "sexy," but had well below average unemployment rates at the time. Companies needed workers and few people from out of the area want to relocate to the Midwest.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:48 AM
 
4,076 posts, read 2,938,996 times
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You could use a local address; however, you're going to have to be prepared to fly to these places on short notice, which is going to be exceptionally expensive.

I would probably just use my own current home address. In your cover letter, explain that you are in the process of relocating to their area and are seeking local employment in "City X." Unless it's an absolute emergency backfill, they'll understand it might take you 2-3 weeks to start anyway.
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Old 04-30-2019, 08:31 AM
 
811 posts, read 1,742,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencgr View Post
So, you are prepared to spend exorbitant amounts of money to fly around the country with little notice?
No, when asked to interview, I would ask if it would be in person or phone, explaining that I currently live in city 'x'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsell View Post
Why are you "out of the market"?

Are you currently employed in your field? If yes, you're a "passive candidate" and are coveted by employers.

If you're not employed at all, you're discriminated against for not being employed.
I do not have full time employment, I have part time, I need full time.

I am looking in six markets, so it would be hard for me to get my linkedin to match up.

I am looking for work in the urban planning field, which means 70% of the jobs are local government.
What should I do?
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