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Old 05-02-2019, 06:56 PM
 
3,914 posts, read 1,022,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefong123 View Post
The best thing about trade is to learn it and then open your own business and have people do the hard labor. I knew a guy who did that. Now he sits in a nice office and collect paychecks every single month.
That's nice for those who want to do that. Had a guy retire from AT&T, collect his pension, and then jump right into being a bridge contractor.

We had some exposure to digging and locating utilities, directional bore, but I'm sure he had to learn the rest from elsewhere.
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Old 05-02-2019, 08:19 PM
 
21,483 posts, read 17,081,085 times
Reputation: 40097
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefong123 View Post
The best thing about trade is to learn it and then open your own business and have people do the hard labor. I knew a guy who did that. Now he sits in a nice office and collect paychecks every single month.
My honey owns his business, but again due to the labor shortages he canít sit in an office (there would really be nothing much to do in one anyway). One reason is because they canít find enough help, but also because of the difficulty finding help and the need for extra bodies, he ends up taking on people that arenít that good. If heís not there theyíre leaving the worksites a mess and the people complain, they take shortcuts that result in poor quality work, they donít know how to talk to the customers, they call out, sometimes no call/no show. I guess it depends on the trade but he has to be out in the field despite owning.
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Old 05-03-2019, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Long Island
1,744 posts, read 1,415,825 times
Reputation: 1460
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefong123 View Post
The best thing about trade is to learn it and then open your own business and have people do the hard labor. I knew a guy who did that. Now he sits in a nice office and collect paychecks every single month.
I disagree. If I wanted to manage a business, then that's the field I would have gotten into. I've been in management several times in my career, and each time I've gone back to the field because I missed actually fixing things.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:02 AM
 
1,120 posts, read 678,251 times
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I do not work in the trades but my dad does. He is an industrial motor mechanic.

My dad has made a pretty good living in his trade. Growing up my family wasn't rich, but we also never wanted for anything. My dad's career allowed for us to have a nice middle class lifestyle.

That said, there are plenty of downsides as others have mentioned. My dad is 56 years old and his body is breaking down. He's had torn rotator cuffs in both shoulders, back problems, knee problems, and issues with the joins in his fingers and wrists. Also, to make a good living he has always worked a lot of hours. He has generally worked five nine hour days and half day Saturdays for my entire life. He rarely works less than that, and often works more. I really hope he can keep up this pace and that his body holds up until he is able to retire. I also fear that his retirement will be unpleasant due to physical issues from a lifetime of hard labor.

I know college isn't the answer for everyone, but for my entire life my dad drilled it into my head that I was going to pursue a college education so that I wouldn't have such a physically demanding career. I'm honestly glad he did. I graduated college 14 years ago and have been a white collar professional since. I earn a higher income than my dad does, I probably surpassed him 3 years ago, so 11 years into my career. Benefits also tend to be better for jobs that require a college education. I've been with my current company for just under 4 years. I already have 4 weeks of vacation and started at the company with 3. It took my dad 20 years to earn a 4th week of vacation at his company. It's also likely that when I reach retirement age my body will be in much better shape than my dad's is.

I'm not trying to disparage the trades at all. My dad, grandfather, uncles, brother-in-law, and many other people I know and love are or were tradesmen in various fields. I have great respect for the work they do. I also do my own work on my car, put a new roof on my house, and have tackled various other remodeling projects at home, so I have some firsthand understanding of how hard that type of work can be. I'm just pointing out that a life in the trades can be hard, especially physically.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Florida
5,693 posts, read 3,754,243 times
Reputation: 10649
My husband installs tile floors in new residential construction. He likes it well enough and he makes pretty good money.

My father and uncle own a family business, which is a sign shop. They install signs on commercial buildings and some high-rise signs. They don't personally do it (though they did when they were young); they just run the business. My husband used to work there and my brother still works there installing the signs. They had to get a certain type of electrician's license but it's not the same license as one would need to be a regular electrician. When my husband last did that type of work 10 years ago, he made about 70K and I assume that would be higher now.
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
4,438 posts, read 1,423,729 times
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I’m retired so i have no fight in this post, but we’re i live the automotive business is king GM, Ford and FCA have their HQ here, along with many plants. There is always a need for skilled tradesmen like pipe fitters, electricians, millwrights and tool and die makers. I know people who makes well over $100,000 with great benefits, and you belong to the UAW. Base pay at Ford Motor Company.

Base Pay
$77K - $84K
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
4,438 posts, read 1,423,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky701 View Post
Those working in the Construction Trades without benefit of Unions and there by No Real Apprenticeship are working for less money, a lot less money, and seldom do they have Health Insurance , if they have any its crap coverage with High Deductible and higher still co-pays. and those few with Health Insurance lose it the day they lose their job. They Never Have Pensions and Annuities..( I am Retired and Have ALL 3..) A lot of Non -Union contractors further cheat their employees by claiming they themselves are independent contractors so they 1099 them.. Contract Labor BTW is against The Law. Truth Is.....Very Few Tradesmen are doing well in Florida except those working for Union Contractors. Those Dues you talk about provide Health Care Insurance and Life Insurance and Pensions and an Annuity. You can spread your "crock" all you want... Companies never declare bankruptcy because of Union Contracts and Union wages. They declare Bankruptcy most often because of poor management and being Top Heavy and or customers who dont pay their bills.. Often Times a Business will use Bankruptcy as a way to save itself while destroying all those who foolishly did business with them.. Who gets hurt the most from Non-Union Contractors? The Customer gets hurt the most..The Customers gets at best, a 2nd class job , because none of the employees were ever actually trained to do what they are doing... The Customer pays the contractor $85 an Hr and the contractor pays his help $20 an hr Cash/1099... So the Customer got the quality that $20 buys not $85..The Non-Union owner on the other hand can make out well because he competes with Businesses paying Livable Wages and Benefits and the non-union owner pays none of those. ( Of Coarse The Quality and dependability lacks with non-union workers) But the non union owner has trouble keeping even decent workers because they too want to own a business where they can screw their employees and keep more for themselves than they pay each employee...
The south has always been against any type of unions from the beginnings of unions.
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
17 posts, read 4,605 times
Reputation: 26
Whatever you do, make sure you enjoy it, and you'll never work a day in your life
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:41 AM
 
2,004 posts, read 866,351 times
Reputation: 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
From your own article, I don't think it's clear at all he's exaggerating.


courses and field training as a first-year apprentice lineman.
As of May 2018, PayScale.com reported that an entry-level lineman with zero to five years of experience earned a median yearly salary of $50,617, with half making less and half making more. ....Southeastern Line Constructors Apprenticeship and Training listed a starting wage as being 60 percent of a journeyman's $23.54 to $38.38 an hour wage.


The median salary they list here is for zero to 5 years experience. OP may have 20 years in. Per OP, the top salary where he works is $38.15, which is right in line with the article. he was very clear he makes the extra due to overtime. Work holidays, work 18 hour shifts in a blizzard or after a n'or easter and it is easy for that overtime rate of $76 an hour to accrue.


What a nerve to look up an article and use to it accuse someone of lying.
0 to 5 years: $48,000
5 to 10 years: $54,000
10 to 20 years: $64,000
20 or more years: $62,000

The bottom 10 percent of electrical linemen made under $37,600, while the top 10 percent earned very generous wages over $99,860


Where is the $130,000 part??? Bottom line is wages are exaggerated on here and stated as if everyone in a trade is making what the top %1 make. 99% of people trying to become a lineman aren't going to make that much. Where are the posters making 37k as linemen hiding on here?? Additionally, there aren't actually that many lineman jobs available. I could start out working a job required a degree and become a CEO making millions per year. SO what if it isn't realistic.

Last edited by Berteau; 05-03-2019 at 10:51 AM..
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:54 AM
 
2,004 posts, read 866,351 times
Reputation: 2203
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefong123 View Post
The best thing about trade is to learn it and then open your own business and have people do the hard labor. I knew a guy who did that. Now he sits in a nice office and collect paychecks every single month.
So its that easy is it? Thats not how it works at all. Being a business owner is hard work and very risky. When you're small you do the physical work yourself while also trying to run the business. Many go out of business and lose everything.
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