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Old 05-02-2019, 05:35 PM
 
1,723 posts, read 566,844 times
Reputation: 3676

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eman Resu VIII View Post
Most people working for other people are suckers who are too afraid to make it on their own. Self employment for the win.
That's as ignorant of a statement as claiming most people who work for themselves do so because they are incapable of being hired by someone else. I was one of the owners of a business. It required long hours, if anything went wrong with the business, an employee, customers, the market, etc, I lost money. There is a large upside potential, absolutely, but I have a much less stressful life making a decent salary working for a corporation where I have significantly less risk and a lot more stability.
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Old 05-03-2019, 01:42 AM
 
1,149 posts, read 621,557 times
Reputation: 1730
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
Is it normal for employers just to throw you into the work with only a crash course? I have seen this more and more lately.

How much time is really excepted to learn and do the process nowadays?
That's the way it was years ago when I was starting out. Except we didn't even get a crash course. (Silicon Valley).

More recently a family member started a new job in the medical field and complained that there was no training and they were really struggling and they were super worried they might get let go. I told them that some successful businesses operate on sink or swim and they have no intention of changing that. So what do you wanna do? "Well I sure as heck am not going to quit. They'll have to drag me out of here!"

Now almost four years later the family member is still there and is up for promotion.
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Old 05-03-2019, 11:20 AM
 
623 posts, read 187,178 times
Reputation: 2271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tencent View Post
It doesn't exist anymore.

They are asking you to complete tasks before your corporate laptop and e-mail are even configured.
That's too bad, and a company deserves what it gets (screwed up workflow) when it resorts to this nonsense. During my career (now retired), I trained a dozen or two new employees, many of whom were college kids interning for the summer, in an Engineering Lab (R&D). If a company is smart, it will allow a new person to shadow a seasoned employee for at least a couple of days, at the very least to find out where the cafeteria, washrooms, and tools are located. Expecting someone to be productive with specialized software (accounting or data acquisition, not MS Mail), on their first day is silly. Should they start learning it on day one? Absolutely. But productive? That takes some time. This is just as true with recent ME grads as it is with the new Housekeeping employee, although the latter obviously requires less orientation. But if you neglect it completely? Expect a bunch of complaints from your internal customers.
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Old 05-03-2019, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
3,927 posts, read 1,671,931 times
Reputation: 10301
I don't think I EVER got much training for a new job, just had to keep asking questions to figure it out.

Make yourself a procedures manual, with steps for doing each part of your job. That way you don't have to remember each little thing, and you become autonomous faster.

Creating your own procedures manual impresses bosses. They will want a copy to train your future replacement. Think about that before sharing it.
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Old 05-03-2019, 12:56 PM
 
11,201 posts, read 8,585,083 times
Reputation: 28255
Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
I don't think I EVER got much training for a new job, just had to keep asking questions to figure it out.

Make yourself a procedures manual, with steps for doing each part of your job. That way you don't have to remember each little thing, and you become autonomous faster.

Creating your own procedures manual impresses bosses. They will want a copy to train your future replacement. Think about that before sharing it.
Exactly.
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Old 05-03-2019, 04:14 PM
 
804 posts, read 732,908 times
Reputation: 1877
Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
I don't think I EVER got much training for a new job, just had to keep asking questions to figure it out.

Make yourself a procedures manual, with steps for doing each part of your job. That way you don't have to remember each little thing, and you become autonomous faster.

Creating your own procedures manual impresses bosses. They will want a copy to train your future replacement. Think about that before sharing it.
Exactly.

Sometimes you have to be proactive and take matters into your own hands. Look at it as creating opportunities for yourself. You can put it on your resume for your next job or use it as a negotiation tool for raises and bonuses.

When I first started my current job, I was directed to a website and told to read the documents and if I have questions, ask. I wasn't given any training, just reading docs and sitting in on conference calls. From that and asking questions, I created my own docs. The documents I was told to read were actually going to be obsolete because at the time we were starting a new project to replace the technology. I updated the docs I initially created to reflect the new tech. I also took ownership of another part of my department's functions, trained myself on it and made docs for that part. All my docs are now part of our department's knowledgebase, which is used by others in our department.
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Old 05-03-2019, 04:29 PM
 
7,435 posts, read 11,589,667 times
Reputation: 8240
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
What about having reasonable expectations? You were hired as a PM. Calculating things for stakeholders is a part of the job. Weren't you qualified or not? Did you figure it out or did you need someone to hold your hand?
I agree with charly for once.

If you're hired at a certain level to do a job (i.e., project engineer, project manager, senior project manager), then you either do that job at the same level of the people who have been working there for years, or you bust your arse and stay late and figure out how to get it done.

The problem with today's workplace is that people expect to keep their salary, no matter what move they make. So, if you're a project manager with 20 years of experience selling tractors, that person expects to keep their salary if they start selling air conditioners.

OTOH, if you're able to survive that learning curve, you could probably learn any job within 2-4 years, and then ... you still have your old salary.

I see PMs get hired here with tangential experience and if they can get through the initial learning curve, they'll be in the clear. Nepotism also helps a lot with getting through the 'learning curve' as does being a good talker or an entertaining person.

And again, people get paid just as much to do virtually nothing here, so ... at least those people have 'some' pressure on them.
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Old 05-03-2019, 06:02 PM
 
1,874 posts, read 751,042 times
Reputation: 3076
I volunteer and I took over a position and barely got trained. I figured the position out myself. Quite frankly, I think it's great. I get to create routines and methods to get things done in a way that makes sense to me. I get to do whatever I want and that's how I like it. I know it's volunteer, but it's sort of the same as a real job, only without the pay.
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Old 05-03-2019, 08:31 PM
 
40 posts, read 8,343 times
Reputation: 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
What about having reasonable expectations? You were hired as a PM. Calculating things for stakeholders is a part of the job. Weren't you qualified or not? Did you figure it out or did you need someone to hold your hand?
I didn't get hired as a PM. I was promoted to a PM. And while I did have basic formulation training as a technician, PMs perform much more complex math that I wasn't used to.

I went to a fellow PM to ask for help. I guess in some ways, throwing me in the water taught me how to search for floating objects. But did I believe it was reasonable? Not really. It just worked out in the end.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:59 AM
 
960 posts, read 364,781 times
Reputation: 1722
Being in a new job is stressful and nerve wracking. I have just felt incompetent because I am learning so many things at once. It is overwhelming. I just completed my first week and I am glad it's over! I am trying to stay positive about building on what I have learned and taking good notes (that make sense) Sometimes the info comes so fast that taking notes ends up looking crazy! I generally like the work so far, but I just get frustrated with the lack of knowledge. Most people I have talked to there are generally happy with their jobs and have been there for a long while. That is really encouraging. I just have to pass this learning curve and build my speed and accuracy.
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