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Old 05-04-2019, 09:16 AM
 
1,459 posts, read 1,209,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
How much time is really excepted to learn and do the process nowadays?
It depends on what industry you're in. If you're a line cook at a pizza joint then you should be able to learn that in about...oh...10 minutes. If you're a young accountant straight out of college then obviously it's going to take a while to learn all of your duties.

It took me about 4 days to learn HEC1 and HEC2 and there was no one in the office to train me, but I already had taken hydrology and hydraulics and therefore had a thorough understanding of the concepts upon which both of those programs were written.
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:21 AM
 
20,607 posts, read 16,659,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
What type of process? In my world, people rise to the occasion. If you're having problems, ask questions and find resources for help and solutions.

Queue the laments about "back in the day they used to train people blah blah."
It’s not a lament but it’s true. When I got my first job as an OT I was trained for a few days, shadowed other therapists, assigned a mentor, and my caseload built over time. I probably had 3 or 4 patients a day the first couple weeks increasing until I had a full caseload. Now new PT and OT grads come in on the first day and handed a schedule with 8 or 9 patients. It’s all about productivity and billing.

You may think it’s silly, but if your grandmom or mom has a stroke and can’t use her right arm or leg, and whether she walks again and goes back home depends on how she progresses in rehab, maybe you’ll then want therapists who have been properly trained and not a new grad who was thrown to the wolves.
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:22 AM
 
1,459 posts, read 1,209,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
taking good notes
This is really good practice. We had a young engineer who refused to write things down so he ended up having ask the same questions over and over again which just made him look like a dumbssa. He was a smart guy but eventually ended up getting canned.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:23 AM
 
3,772 posts, read 2,130,291 times
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In Mismanaged holes with high turnover, low employee morale, and P'd off customers and continuous loss of business ... Sure

No real training in place and throwing everyone to the wolves is only asking for trouble in the long run. You may as well just close the company down if you're going to operate like that because sooner or later it WILL ultimately close or just be a shell of its former self. (best case scenario)

If you don't invest in your employees and their growth and train them properly, don't expect to have many employees left. At least any quality ones. They will all leave
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:40 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,035 posts, read 3,222,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jilly9244 View Post
Is it normal for employers just to throw you into the work with only a crash course? I have seen this more and more lately.

How much time is really excepted to learn and do the process nowadays?
At my job you are taken on a tour of the area, shown where the MSDS and First aid and other areas are then turned over to the supervisor and then shown the work and you have a trainer.

You are trained on paperwork and along with that, how to best do the job, though you can change it as you see fit.....Then after a week, you are asked what shift you'd like and then sent to that one.

Then you REALLY begin to learn what the real way to work there is actually....
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Old 05-05-2019, 03:16 PM
 
7 posts, read 814 times
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yes and 3 months
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:11 PM
 
30,140 posts, read 47,370,265 times
Reputation: 16076
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
It’s not a lament but it’s true. When I got my first job as an OT I was trained for a few days, shadowed other therapists, assigned a mentor, and my caseload built over time. I probably had 3 or 4 patients a day the first couple weeks increasing until I had a full caseload. Now new PT and OT grads come in on the first day and handed a schedule with 8 or 9 patients. It’s all about productivity and billing.

You may think it’s silly, but if your grandmom or mom has a stroke and can’t use her right arm or leg, and whether she walks again and goes back home depends on how she progresses in rehab, maybe you’ll then want therapists who have been properly trained and not a new grad who was thrown to the wolves.
Good points and you are right
There is lot of difference going from college work—even where they have had internships and done shadowing as part of their courses and actually working a caseload

The job I got that had the most training was with the state—dept of health and human services to be a caseworker for food stamps/afdc and Medicaid
I spent 10 wk of paid training—before being sent to local office and then spent a few days shadowing a caseworker
But that was hard job to learn—tremendous requirement for policy knowledge and well as ability to read people
And always working under a time clock to finish X number of interviews a day and complete all cases actions timely and w/o policy flaws
You had X number of cases pulled at random each month
They were reviewed by supervisors and others higher up the food chain
You were scored on your accuracy, timeliness, and any complaints that “clients” might have made about you
It was very stressful and demanding
Some people in my group were dumber than Hodor and were always doing things to crash the computer net (like not deleting any of their old mail or completed cases)
You never wanted to answer their phone if they were out or work one of their cases on Intake day because there were ALWAYS problems

And there was always retraining, special courses
The state spent a lot of money on training
Unfortunately it was very difficult to fire someone who was incompetent so training didn’t solve every problem
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:23 PM
 
30,140 posts, read 47,370,265 times
Reputation: 16076
PS read story today in NYTimes about REmington Arms facility in Huntsville AL and how Remington came to basically shoot itself in the foot and turn a remarkedly profitable company into one in bankruptcy...
Owned by a hedge fund
Mismanaged by said hedge fund in way that made it millions and left Remington holding the debt
Hired contract workers vs long-term employees for production and other areas so company could avoid paying the higher min wage the city required Remington to agree to when it was giving tax rebates and a free production facility to move into in Huntsville

If you aren’t training workers to succeed, you are pointing company into a danger zone

My SIL was continuous improvement director for trucking company in FL—was hired by the CEO/president to help improve the performance, find areas where they were losing money, help make the company profitable...
But the people in mgmt who had been there long time didn’t want to change what they were doing
And the CEO/president who was majority stock owner (him and the bank) wasn’t a strong enough personality to make them make changes...
They had a contract w/Budweiser to deliver beer—but they had b even losing money on the contract for over 5 yrs—they wouldn’t increase the rate—were afraid they would lose the contract tha was costing them money...
Explain the logic there, can you?

After SIL left (because he wouldn’t relocate) in a year the bank took over operations and forced lot of changes including kicking out the CEO...
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:44 PM
 
1,866 posts, read 720,300 times
Reputation: 3983
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
PS read story today in NYTimes about REmington Arms facility in Huntsville AL and how Remington came to basically shoot itself in the foot and turn a remarkedly profitable company into one in bankruptcy...
Owned by a hedge fund
Mismanaged by said hedge fund in way that made it millions and left Remington holding the debt
Hired contract workers vs long-term employees for production and other areas so company could avoid paying the higher min wage the city required Remington to agree to when it was giving tax rebates and a free production facility to move into in Huntsville

If you aren’t training workers to succeed, you are pointing company into a danger zone

My SIL was continuous improvement director for trucking company in FL—was hired by the CEO/president to help improve the performance, find areas where they were losing money, help make the company profitable...
But the people in mgmt who had been there long time didn’t want to change what they were doing
And the CEO/president who was majority stock owner (him and the bank) wasn’t a strong enough personality to make them make changes...
They had a contract w/Budweiser to deliver beer—but they had b even losing money on the contract for over 5 yrs—they wouldn’t increase the rate—were afraid they would lose the contract tha was costing them money...
Explain the logic there, can you?

After SIL left (because he wouldn’t relocate) in a year the bank took over operations and forced lot of changes including kicking out the CEO...
I thought that companies were infallible and never make mistakes??? It is always the employees that are wrong, right?
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Old 05-09-2019, 07:30 PM
 
959 posts, read 363,287 times
Reputation: 1719
My boss is totally treating me like an idiot, which I'm not. She found a lot of mistakes that I made and pretty much told me that I was doing the most simple task and that if I couldn't get it right, then it isn't going to work.

Her training was choppy at best and now she is finding mistakes. Today she finally sat with me and went through everything, but her tone is so condescending. Short of cussing her out, I just laugh at her snide remarks. How do I deal with this professionally without ruffling any feathers. It seriously has me stressed out. But at the same time, logically I know, I shouldn't let this heifer stress me.
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