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Old 05-02-2019, 05:12 AM
 
104 posts, read 82,393 times
Reputation: 122

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So, Iíve been at my company for over 10 years now and I have always been a top performer in the company and am in great standing. However over the last three years or so due to some upheaval in our group, I have bounced from manager to manager to manager to help less experienced teams.

Thatís said, I actually like my latest landing spot but Iím already getting a sense that I might be moved to another team AGAIN. How do I tell my manager that Iíd be unhappy with that move and that frankly, the bouncing around is starting to seem disrespectful of me and my time?
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Old 05-02-2019, 05:48 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,339 posts, read 7,982,576 times
Reputation: 4756
I would just sit down with your current manager and explain how much you enjoy being with this group and you'd like to stay here. But you are concerned since you've been moved around in the last x years and would like that to stop.

Then ask what you can do to stay here.

There are a bunch of reasons why this may be happening. It would help if you knew that reason. Albeit it may not be offered to you if it's part of a grander plan (or they just have no clue). But the other thing is whether or not you can do anything about it. If not, then you may have a tough decision to make - do you accept the role of a "floater", or look for other opportunities?
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Old 05-02-2019, 06:10 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,072 posts, read 2,899,892 times
Reputation: 23939
Quote:
Originally Posted by blinkme323 View Post
So, I’ve been at my company for over 10 years now and I have always been a top performer in the company and am in great standing. However over the last three years or so due to some upheaval in our group, I have bounced from manager to manager to manager to help less experienced teams.

That’s said, I actually like my latest landing spot but I’m already getting a sense that I might be moved to another team AGAIN. How do I tell my manager that I’d be unhappy with that move and that frankly, the bouncing around is starting to seem disrespectful of me and my time?
When you say "new" manager, is this someone who knows the teams somewhat already (transferred from within) or someone who is really new to the workplace? That would probably help you decide how to approach this.

Are you going to be meeting with this new manager as part of his/her orientation to the new office? Will you meet to familiarize him/her with your duties? If so maybe ask whether they anticipate any more shifting teams around. It is reasonable to want to know. Use that as an opener...instead of giving some vague non-specific complaint about the past actions, I would be very specific about why my current landing spot suits me and why keeping me in it would benefit the company. Why I am more productive, the work suits my skills, that the current team is benefiting from my experience, and why upsetting the cart once again wouldn't necessarily make anything better. You won't come off as a complainer, but someone who knows where their value lies and wants to take advantage of it.
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:11 AM
 
104 posts, read 82,393 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
When you say "new" manager, is this someone who knows the teams somewhat already (transferred from within) or someone who is really new to the workplace? That would probably help you decide how to approach this.

Are you going to be meeting with this new manager as part of his/her orientation to the new office? Will you meet to familiarize him/her with your duties? If so maybe ask whether they anticipate any more shifting teams around. It is reasonable to want to know. Use that as an opener...instead of giving some vague non-specific complaint about the past actions, I would be very specific about why my current landing spot suits me and why keeping me in it would benefit the company. Why I am more productive, the work suits my skills, that the current team is benefiting from my experience, and why upsetting the cart once again wouldn't necessarily make anything better. You won't come off as a complainer, but someone who knows where their value lies and wants to take advantage of it.
So while they are my new manager, they have been with our group and the company itself for quite a long time. They are also quite familiar with me as an associate, but this is the first time that we are on the same "team" per say. That said, having been through this rodeo before, I'm already seeing signs that I'll likely be shipped off in a few months to "help" yet another team, which I just don't think is fair at this point.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
2,275 posts, read 1,150,257 times
Reputation: 5345
Quote:
Originally Posted by blinkme323 View Post
So, Iíve been at my company for over 10 years now and I have always been a top performer in the company and am in great standing. However over the last three years or so due to some upheaval in our group, I have bounced from manager to manager to manager to help less experienced teams.

Thatís said, I actually like my latest landing spot but Iím already getting a sense that I might be moved to another team AGAIN. How do I tell my manager that Iíd be unhappy with that move and that frankly, the bouncing around is starting to seem disrespectful of me and my time?
How about just that? Have a very frank conversation with your manager and tell them that you feel hamstrung, always stuck in a reactive role, and need to move your career forward. Have and present a plan for what you want to do. If you're truly a top performer, you'll have no problem leaving an implication that if this doesn't stop, you'll be forced to move on.

Or, tell them that the role you're winding up playing, that of a troubleshooter and problem-fixer, is worth more than a regular team member. Make the case for how you're worth more, and tell them that you're happy to do that job but for an additional $X, and if you're going to get paid the same as everyone else you'll provide the same output.
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Old 05-05-2019, 02:12 PM
 
654 posts, read 308,337 times
Reputation: 1225
If I told my employer I did not want to do something they asked they would tell me to leave. . . happiness is not a consideration. "Need skill X on team B" is all they care about.
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Old 05-05-2019, 03:20 PM
 
7 posts, read 722 times
Reputation: 16
oO? You train people and they pay you to do it so.......you are getting paid more aka raise bonus to train people how to do the job right?

Your responsibilities changed without you knowing it or you fear the next team you train will replace you iunno context needed.
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:22 PM
 
4,069 posts, read 5,463,311 times
Reputation: 4920
Last time I told a manager that I was happy, they called it an ultimatum and were pissed at me. I never mentioned quitting.

It will likely been as an ultimatum and put at the top of the list for the next layoff. It's always a risk.
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