U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-02-2019, 11:54 AM
 
Location: DFW
555 posts, read 155,984 times
Reputation: 878

Advertisements

In 1895, if you wanted to ask someone a question, tell them exciting news, or get business done, you would get into your coach and go to see them. It mattered not if they were in the bathtub (home), or in the middle of helping another customer (work), as it was your only choice

By the 1920's almost 100% of America had phones. It then became much less laborious to contact someone for business purposes, and was starting to be considered rude to simply show up at someone's home without calling first, as we now had another choice. Certain businesses, like retail, of course still commanded presence, but others, such as banking, may be better served by calling first and resolving over the phone, or making an appointment so as to not rudely barge in on someone else's time

Today, we have yet another choice: email and/or text message. Today, for those businesses which actually sit and work at a computer in order to help customers and get things done, it is RUDE to call and demand to be helped immediately. It says to the person receiving the call "I don't care how busy you are, what you are doing, or how invasive it is for you to have you stop, drop, and help me immediately. *I* am the most important person in the world, and whomever you're currently helping is dirt under my feet".

If it were, say, a retail store, where you actually WANT foot traffic, you still would not barge into a conversation and force the salesperson to drop what they're doing and help you in favor of who they were already helping.

Even in medical situations, if it is not an emergency life or death situation, you make an appointment, often by computer and not phone.

Calling is aggressive, invasive, and rude if email is a choice you have, and you do not have an emergency.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-02-2019, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,604 posts, read 3,032,047 times
Reputation: 12847
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
In 1895, if you wanted to ask someone a question, tell them exciting news, or get business done, you would get into your coach and go to see them.
You're around 20 years off, there.

NYC phone wires in the 1800s. (It got much worse.)


However, my solution is to answer the damn thing when and if I feel like it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
4,044 posts, read 7,320,577 times
Reputation: 5916
OP - do you realize that some people (seniors) don’t “do” e-mail at all, or are very uncomfortable with it? If you are so against incoming calls, what’s wrong with letting it go to voice mail or “let me do some research on that and I’ll get back with you?”

Sometimes, a voice conversation is much easier than a bunch of emails.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 02:46 PM
 
4,039 posts, read 2,613,367 times
Reputation: 8745
I disagree. If a person doesn't want to answer a call they can let it go to voicemail. Sometimes a call can take 2 minutes to get resolution for an issue while an email can take 15 minutes to compose. Emails get lost, stopped by spam filters etc. Also once something is in an email, it can easily be made public. A phone call is not rude or aggressive, it's a personal preference. Nothing wrong with email or text of course but it's not always the best or preferred option for some people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 03:00 PM
 
Location: DFW
555 posts, read 155,984 times
Reputation: 878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
You're around 20 years off, there.

NYC phone wires in the 1800s. (It got much worse.)


However, my solution is to answer the damn thing when and if I feel like it.
LOL- Can't do that at work. I do cheat the system though, and call myself from my cell phone and put myself on hold so it looks like I am on the phone and therefore cannot take another one
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 03:01 PM
 
Location: DFW
555 posts, read 155,984 times
Reputation: 878
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan123 View Post
I disagree. If a person doesn't want to answer a call they can let it go to voicemail. Sometimes a call can take 2 minutes to get resolution for an issue while an email can take 15 minutes to compose. Emails get lost, stopped by spam filters etc. Also once something is in an email, it can easily be made public. A phone call is not rude or aggressive, it's a personal preference. Nothing wrong with email or text of course but it's not always the best or preferred option for some people.
In my line of work, it's not what you know, it's what you can prove, so everything needs to be in writing. That's another part of the same rant
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 03:50 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,119 posts, read 2,921,213 times
Reputation: 24107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
In 1895, if you wanted to ask someone a question, tell them exciting news, or get business done, you would get into your coach and go to see them. It mattered not if they were in the bathtub (home), or in the middle of helping another customer (work), as it was your only choice

By the 1920's almost 100% of America had phones. It then became much less laborious to contact someone for business purposes, and was starting to be considered rude to simply show up at someone's home without calling first, as we now had another choice. Certain businesses, like retail, of course still commanded presence, but others, such as banking, may be better served by calling first and resolving over the phone, or making an appointment so as to not rudely barge in on someone else's time

Today, we have yet another choice: email and/or text message. Today, for those businesses which actually sit and work at a computer in order to help customers and get things done, it is RUDE to call and demand to be helped immediately. It says to the person receiving the call "I don't care how busy you are, what you are doing, or how invasive it is for you to have you stop, drop, and help me immediately. *I* am the most important person in the world, and whomever you're currently helping is dirt under my feet".

If it were, say, a retail store, where you actually WANT foot traffic, you still would not barge into a conversation and force the salesperson to drop what they're doing and help you in favor of who they were already helping.

Even in medical situations, if it is not an emergency life or death situation, you make an appointment, often by computer and not phone.

Calling is aggressive, invasive, and rude if email is a choice you have, and you do not have an emergency.
I suppose it's reasonable for me to conclude you won't be calling anyone to rant about this right?

FWIW, in some places I've worked the only communication method that worked reliably when everything else failed was a land line phone. One bad move by your IT person can make this a reality. Don't ask me why I know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn,NY
10,614 posts, read 13,146,734 times
Reputation: 16173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Okey Dokie View Post
OP - do you realize that some people (seniors) don’t “do” e-mail at all, or are very uncomfortable with it? If you are so against incoming calls, what’s wrong with letting it go to voice mail or “let me do some research on that and I’ll get back with you?”

Sometimes, a voice conversation is much easier than a bunch of emails.
Texts are best for quick communication on non urgent manners I agree. However a phone call is often used for a follow up of no timely response is given. Several hours after sending is warranted, however some freak out after a few minutes and call then. It can be easy for even the quick methods of communication to fly under the radar if busy too. Ever had a pile of papers, multiple projects and other office stuff going on at the same time? Answering a particular email in a packed inbox on a day like this is tough.

My one and only office job was like that. One nut would call two MINUTES after sending an email though, with a basic question on a reservation months in advance. For those of you working in an office, I tip my hat to you. I will never do it again personally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
3,890 posts, read 1,651,610 times
Reputation: 10204
I don't think everybody had a coach in 1895, they'd probably ride a horse or walk. More likely, they would send a letter.

Historic accuracy aside, sometimes a phone call is better than email.
For one thing, many people only read and respond to the first line of an email, or only address some of the the issues raised.

And sometimes you have to show up in person to get something done.

OP, you're lucky if all your issues can be resolved by text.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-02-2019, 06:22 PM
 
11,128 posts, read 8,537,739 times
Reputation: 28094
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
Calling is aggressive, invasive, and rude if email is a choice you have, and you do not have an emergency.
So, this really isn't about work or employment. It's just you trying to explain your personal preference for email or text.

I have no issue with the phone, bridgelines, or online meetings using Webex or Skype.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top