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Old 05-04-2019, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,860 posts, read 1,252,670 times
Reputation: 6430

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I can't tell looking at the resume since it could be someone young who only has those two experiences, an older person who has changed careers and left the former experience (and graduation date) off their resume. The certifications are up to date, so if I were in the market to hire someone with this background I would give them a call; wouldn't matter to me if they were 22 , 62 or anything in between.

Besides, if I were one of those people who really did care to find out how old this candidate is, all I would have to do is look them up on LinkedIn or Google them.
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:32 PM
 
2,387 posts, read 683,329 times
Reputation: 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
This makes no sense. I've never seen any employer plan that charges based on age.
The rates for the employer plan are based on the risk profile.

An employer that has 100 employees and they're all smokers and over 50 years of age, pay more than another employer that has 100 employees that has younger people and non-smokers.


Quote:
What are you talking about? Insurance companies are not charging based on the age of employees.


This is 100% unsubstantiated.
You've never tried shopping around for health insurance. How old are you? Since you deny that age discrimination exists (since you keep saying everything is 100% the job candidate's fault they can't get a job) you're clearly not an older woman.

May I recommend actually doing your homework on how insurance works?
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Old 05-04-2019, 10:36 PM
 
2,387 posts, read 683,329 times
Reputation: 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I'm beginning to think you don't know anything but prejudices you learned some long time ago.
Agreed, in her mind, there is nothing any job candidate can do that is right.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:50 AM
 
1,437 posts, read 1,118,555 times
Reputation: 4811
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
It's a false belief that younger workers are cheap. Many young people make six figure salaries. Most places aren't hiring using actuarial data.

The point is that many claims of age discrimination from a resume submission are false.
I work for a major automobile manufacturer and younger workers are usually much less expensive then older workers.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:15 AM
 
2,132 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3724
Essentially all large employers self-insure, and have done so for decades. They hire the insurance company to administer everything. Employees might think Cigna or United Healthcare provides health insurance, but they do not; Cigna or United Healthcare are the plan administrator. The financial burden of payments to doctors & hospitals lies on the employer. Doctors, hospitals, and employees interact with Cigna or United Healthcare rather than interact with that employer.

Think of it as outsourcing.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:23 AM
 
2,132 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3724
At some point you need to verify the candidate actually has that B.S. in CIS from that university. To perform that check, the graduation date will be needed. If the university can provide the verification without the graduation date, they will surely provide the graduation date.

At any rate, to me, there is nothing on the resume that makes the candidate stand out. Some of the things listed are sort of like 4-wheelers (you don't see an automobile manufacturer advertise its car has 4 wheels; that's assumed). I imagine this resume could be lost in the middle of the pack.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:24 AM
 
1,663 posts, read 547,450 times
Reputation: 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
This makes no sense. I've never seen any employer plan that charges based on age. What are you talking about? Insurance companies are not charging based on the age of employees.


This is 100% unsubstantiated.
Net cost to a company factors age of employees into account, which then flows to the portion that is charged to an employee.

I assume you've never been part of selecting or negotiating a health plan for a company? The total cost is absolutely higher with more older employees. You actually see how much each employee is charged to a company. Most companies simply bucket the portion that's passed on to the employee into "single", "married", "married with kids", "single with kids" because there would be a revolt if companies actually passed the true cost along and charged older employees more.

I've only been involved in this process for companies under 50 employees, so the process might be different for larger employers.

Last edited by Lekrii; 05-07-2019 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:34 AM
 
780 posts, read 202,631 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lekrii View Post
Net cost to a company factors age of employees into account, which then flows to the portion that is charged to an employee.

I assume you've never been part of selecting or negotiating a health plan for a company?
On the 2-3 threads floating around on the topic of age discrimination, this particular poster you've responded to is so far off base on this issue. To claim that insurance companies aren't basing their rates on certain demographics that are traditionally higher cost is downright ignorant of the process. That is exactly what insurance companies are doing. It's the whole idea behind underwriting and actuarial sciences. They're assessing risk (in dollars) and charging an amount they believe is appropriate to cover the projected costs of administering the plan. If an employee census and claims extract comes back to them with higher risk pool of members (older workers, females under 40, chronically ill large claimants), then the premium is going to reflect that.

And while the hiring manager may want to onboard a senior aged candidate, the philosophy from the top might be "we need to get younger to reduce our overhead costs (salary, insurance premiums, etc.)", which may preclude the hiring manager's ability to hire such a candidate.
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:42 AM
 
1,663 posts, read 547,450 times
Reputation: 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
On the 2-3 threads floating around on the topic of age discrimination, this particular poster is so far off base on this issue. To claim that insurance companies aren't basing their rates on certain demographics that are traditionally higher cost is downright ignorant of the process. That is exactly what insurance companies are doing. It's the whole idea behind underwriting and actuarial sciences. They're assessing risk (in dollars) and charging an amount they believe is appropriate to cover the projected costs of administering the plan. If an employee census and claims extract comes back to them with higher risk pool of members (older workers, females under 40, chronically ill large claimants), then the premium is going to reflect that.

And while the hiring manager may want to onboard a senior aged candidate, the philosophy from the top might be "we need to get younger to reduce our overhead costs (salary, insurance premiums, etc.)", which may preclude the hiring manager's ability to hire such a candidate.
Yep. I've been on a team that put together and selected health plans for a company. We saw on a line by line basis how much they charged the company by employee, which rolled up into the net cost to the company. That was then taken into account when we decided how much (10%, 15%, 20%, etc.) of the total cost the employee would be charged.

I was in the room when they had conversations on how to charge employees so that the younger employees pick up the tab for the higher cost of older employees, as well as when they put projections together on how much money would be saved once boomers retired and were replaced with younger employees.

Especially for a smaller company, those dollar amounts are not trivial.
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:05 PM
 
11,118 posts, read 8,523,617 times
Reputation: 28059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lekrii View Post
Yep. I've been on a team that put together and selected health plans for a company. We saw on a line by line basis how much they charged the company by employee, which rolled up into the net cost to the company. That was then taken into account when we decided how much (10%, 15%, 20%, etc.) of the total cost the employee would be charged.

I was in the room when they had conversations on how to charge employees so that the younger employees pick up the tab for the higher cost of older employees, as well as when they put projections together on how much money would be saved once boomers retired and were replaced with younger employees.

Especially for a smaller company, those dollar amounts are not trivial.
How small a company was this? I only work for companies with over 50k employees. At that size, the company can take advantage of economies of scale. Line by line granularity is possible but I highly doubt it.
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