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Old 05-07-2019, 12:16 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,436,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by likealady View Post
And why does a candidate's age matter? are they or are they not qualified?
Age shouldn't matter first pass.
It shouldn't matter but to a lot of companies it does, unfortunately
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:19 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,436,132 times
Reputation: 5692
I'm 37. I can't decide if I'm an "older worker" or not but I seem to be with all the offers I'm not getting ...
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:38 PM
 
1,672 posts, read 548,866 times
Reputation: 3560
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
How small a company was this? I only work for companies with over 50k employees. At that size, the company can take advantage of economies of scale. Line by line granularity is possible but I highly doubt it.
All health insurance companies have different rates for people of higher risk profiles (of which age is distinctly one). You as the employee simply don't see dollar amounts broken out like that.
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:55 PM
 
10,993 posts, read 2,731,965 times
Reputation: 5092
I thought the advice was to never put more than the past ten years on a resume, usually because that experience is irrelevant for more occupations.

The assumption that an older worker wants more money than a younger one isn't always correct. Some young people have a very inflated view of their value! Some older workers know age discrimination is real and would be willing to accept less money in exchange for steady work. It never hurts to ask a candidate if you like their experience but can't afford to pay more.

Also, employees in their 60s get Medicare so might pass receiving a company's health care which would save a lot of money.
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:03 PM
 
991 posts, read 345,731 times
Reputation: 3127
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
How small a company was this? I only work for companies with over 50k employees. At that size, the company can take advantage of economies of scale. Line by line granularity is possible but I highly doubt it.
A large company that skews towards a high average age is going to pay much higher premiums than a company that skews younger. PERIOD.

There are many companies that discriminate based on age for a variety of reasons: financial, cultural, etc. You may not see it, but it does not mean it does not occur. You seem rather ignorant or arrogant (I am not sure which) to not understand age discrimination is rampant.

There are lots of hardworking people who get caught up in layoffs, reorganizations, mergers, acquisitions, etc. and lose their job through no fault of their own. I know this because my husband has had to lay off some very talented technology people over the years. The younger employees usually walked right into another job rather quickly. Many of the older people had great difficulty finding another job.
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,156 posts, read 11,761,610 times
Reputation: 32132
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
In the real world, you must know that none of this is happening.

Nothing is REQUIRED on a resume. Leaving off any big of information is okay. Inclusion of information is optional. Leaving the date off the degree is common and doesn't raise eyebrows. Folks are leaving off their address nowadays for privacy reasons.

Initial scans of resumes get 30-60 seconds. No one is hunting down candidates ages.

So, all these claims of age discrimination based off of a submitted resume are questionable. Perhaps there were just better candidates who more closely aligned with the company's needs.
Who is applying for a job just based on a resume anymore? Particularly at a large company. I've always had to go through their online application process which requires dates for previous jobs and for when a degree was earned. It's been a while but they may even require a date of birth.

So no, the fact that someone can create a stripped down resume doesn't automatically mean that the majority of employers don't have access to someone's age. Whether that factors into hiring decisions is another question but it's simply flat out wrong to claim that age discrimination isn't happening because people aren't giving out their age on a resume.
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:38 PM
 
780 posts, read 202,959 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
How small a company was this? I only work for companies with over 50k employees. At that size, the company can take advantage of economies of scale. Line by line granularity is possible but I highly doubt it.
Lekrii already explained this, and I have explained it a few times on these various "age discrimination" threads already. But I'll chime in one more time here.

None of this has anything to do with 'economies of scale' or line by line granularity. It's about assessing risk and placing a price tag on said risk to cover the costs of expected claims, with a little profit margin added in. After all, insurance carriers are businesses, too, and they are in business to make money.

When they are developing a premium that the company will pay for the year's health coverage, the carrier will look at a member census (employees + their dependents) and historic claims data. If the population of the company is older, has poor claims experience, or has other demographic groups which tend to skew higher in cost, then your yearly premium will generally reflect that. Why would it be higher? Well, they are trying to project out what it's going to cost to cover all the claims of the covered members. So if you have members on the plan that traditionally cost more (per the actuarial tables), your premium will be higher than if you have members who are traditionally less costly (per the actuarial tables). Older people traditionally cost more to insure than younger people, that's just a fact. Hence why a company with an older employee base will likely have higher insurance premiums than a company with a younger, healthier employee base.

It's clear that you don't fully understand how this works, and that's fine; it's a complicated business. However, what is mind boggling to me is that you're still trying to debate on this particular issue as if you know what you're talking about.
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Old 05-07-2019, 02:19 PM
 
182 posts, read 30,378 times
Reputation: 263
Sorry, but a CIS degree does not give the experience or qualifications to be a project manager in two years. I would expect someone with a MIS degree or some other "managerial" experience.
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Old 05-07-2019, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,192 posts, read 259,805 times
Reputation: 480
OP's candidate seems early 30s but they could be hiding something. Not every older employee adds to health costs though.
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Old 05-08-2019, 08:00 AM
 
780 posts, read 202,959 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
Not every older employee adds to health costs though.
Does not matter. Not every 22 year old speeds or causes traffic accidents, but they are still assessed as higher risk due to the data and statistics. That's why their insurance premiums tend to be higher.

You're lumped in with the rest of them regardless.
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