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Old 05-03-2019, 04:13 PM
 
Location: USA
973 posts, read 1,039,038 times
Reputation: 1103

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Let me preface this post by saying I'm not trying to stereotype or anything like that. I've just heard and read that paralegals do tend to be women. (I'm a 34-year-old male.)

The reason I ask is because I created a thread here a few weeks ago in which I stated I was interested in transitioning from copywriting/marketing communications to a more research- and writing-heavy field.

A few people suggested the paralegal field, but I know little about it. I've also noted that job listings for paralegals don't seem to ask for a bachelor's degree. (I hold one in marketing.)

I've developed an interest in real estate, property management, housing, hotels, etc., so something that couples any of those with writing and research/law seems ideal.

Maybe real estate paralegal? A proposal/RFP writer for a real estate firm?
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Old 05-03-2019, 04:24 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,445 posts, read 3,634,340 times
Reputation: 19466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordsmith12 View Post
I've also noted that job listings for paralegals don't seem to ask for a bachelor's degree. (I hold one in marketing.)
Well, as I've said before here, paralegal jobs have little or no actual requirements other than what the employer specifies. There is no "legal requirement" for a paralegal to be licensed in any way, shape or form (the way that nurses, doctors, realtors, etc have to get state licensing), paralegals don't have to have a college degree or even a high school diploma. They work under the direction of a lawyer and the lawyer can hire anyone they want. Even people with criminal records and felony convictions can work as paralegals. It has never been a so-called "prestigious" job, IMO. It's just a tough field to break into unless you know someone, otherwise, it's hard to get a paralegal job without experience.

As for it being a "woman's job"? That's a bizarre question. As for lawyers, there are currently (slightly) more women enrolled in law school than men. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/16/b...irst-time.html

Last edited by PriscillaVanilla; 05-03-2019 at 04:48 PM..
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Old 05-03-2019, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,579 posts, read 3,010,942 times
Reputation: 12784
Being a paralegal is all the really boring parts of being a lawyer, at far lower pay. Gender is irrelevant.

(Yes, there are some who are treated like junior counsel and have more elevated responsibilities. But most are research and typing slaves.)
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Old 05-03-2019, 05:21 PM
 
11,118 posts, read 8,527,266 times
Reputation: 28065
OP, you've talked about being a proposal writer for months in MULTIPLE threads. Have you done one thing to move towards investigating that career field? Talked to any proposal writers, investigated training, looked at job postings, etc?

Jump off this carousel and do something tangible towards figuring this out.
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Old 05-03-2019, 05:23 PM
 
9,778 posts, read 16,966,691 times
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There are 2 and 4 year degrees in paralegal studies. I don't know if I've ever seen a male paralegal. Probably mostly women because it is an "office job."
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Old 05-03-2019, 05:59 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,445 posts, read 3,634,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe from dayton View Post
There are 2 and 4 year degrees in paralegal studies. I don't know if I've ever seen a male paralegal.
Sounds like a waste of tuition money since no degree is required.

As for it being an office job, some people who work for attorneys will call themselves paralegals when they aren't. They are a receptionist, legal secretary, administrative assistant, file clerk or something of that nature. Real paralegals do legal research.
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Old 05-03-2019, 06:16 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,086 posts, read 2,905,107 times
Reputation: 23949
Maybe more women end up becoming paralegals because they started off working in administrative type positions, ended up handling more legal matters, and subsequently developed an interest in law. The job may just be an interim while studying for or funding law school down the line. They may have an interest in law but don't have or want to invest the time/$$ to pass the bar.
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Old 05-04-2019, 05:44 AM
 
6,179 posts, read 2,852,918 times
Reputation: 15654
Think of paralegals as the backbone to the research necessary to make the lawyer look good.

I've conferred with a lawyer from real estate,contracts,and consumer affairs. Each time the person who ultimately did the foot work was the paralegal.

Two were male and one was female. Didn't make a difference in the data being parlayed.
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Old 05-04-2019, 06:28 AM
 
5,247 posts, read 5,166,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Sounds like a waste of tuition money since no degree is required.

As for it being an office job, some people who work for attorneys will call themselves paralegals when they aren't. They are a receptionist, legal secretary, administrative assistant, file clerk or something of that nature. Real paralegals do legal research.

There are a lot of jobs that do not require a degree but an employer may still want a specific degree.
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Old 05-04-2019, 08:49 AM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,445 posts, read 3,634,340 times
Reputation: 19466
Quote:
Originally Posted by city living View Post
There are a lot of jobs that do not require a degree but an employer may still want a specific degree.
That is what I said in my previous post.
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