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Old 05-09-2019, 06:10 PM
 
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I graduated in the mid 70s with a liberal arts degree. When I got out of college, we were in the worst recession I've ever seen in my life time. Up to that point, we were all told that it didn't matter what your degree was in, you would still get a good job. That recession proved this to be all wrong. At that time, we were lucky if we found a minimum wage job.
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:22 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,517 posts, read 3,654,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
I graduated in the mid 70s with a liberal arts degree. When I got out of college, we were in the worst recession I've ever seen in my life time. Up to that point, we were all told that it didn't matter what your degree was in, you would still get a good job. That recession proved this to be all wrong. At that time, we were lucky if we found a minimum wage job.
The recession of the late 80s, early 90s was just as bad. Lots of unemployed college graduates.
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:31 PM
 
13,038 posts, read 6,233,216 times
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Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
The recession of the late 80s, early 90s was just as bad. Lots of unemployed college graduates.
I don't deny that there were recessions during those time periods. However, they weren't as bad as the one in the mid 70s.

I wasn't exaggerating when I said that those of us who graduated during the mid 70s were happy if we could find a minimum wage job. When I went home after graduating, I went in search of any honest work. My brother worked at the local hospital and told me that they had a hiring freeze. I called the local nursing home and they weren't hiring. One day I noticed that a local greasy spoon was looking for a server. They would only consider experienced people. Honestly, I don't think things were that bad during those 2 later recessions.
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:31 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,889 posts, read 42,123,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
The recession of the late 80s, early 90s was just as bad. Lots of unemployed college graduates.
That was mostly a real estate/banking recession, much like the most recent one. The preceding one in the early 80s, which was just a continuation of the 70s recessions, gutted entire industries, many of which never recovered.
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Old 05-09-2019, 09:27 PM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: USA
996 posts, read 385,711 times
Reputation: 2678
Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
I graduated in the mid 70s with a liberal arts degree. When I got out of college, we were in the worst recession I've ever seen in my life time. Up to that point, we were all told that it didn't matter what your degree was in, you would still get a good job. That recession proved this to be all wrong. At that time, we were lucky if we found a minimum wage job.
I went into the service in 1976 so I missed that recession.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
The recession of the late 80s, early 90s was just as bad. Lots of unemployed college graduates.
The early 80’s was a challenge as President Peanut transitioned to Reagan. I went into college after getting out of the service in 1980 so I missed that period.

The people that graduated with me are still trying to figure out how someone with my GPA landed a job a Fortune 10 company. I only had two interviews that last quarter. Both were with the same company, different businesses. There’s a place even for engineers who barely graduate.

By the late 80’s, early 90’s, I was on an educational leave so I missed that recession.

I just finished my 34th year in March with the same company although the Fortune ranking has slipped over the years. My timing has been fortunate - and I’ve only been laid off twice. Lol
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,658 posts, read 2,292,592 times
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Originally Posted by concept_fusion View Post
I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
Me being born in 1991 instead of 1961 is something I'll never forgive Jesus for.
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsford, NY
520 posts, read 625,935 times
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Most IT jobs, management jobs, basic financial jobs they do not want anyone trained in those areas as they think that means cost. Seems most companies today go for lowest cost and mostly that means generally trained. I am retired but of my two kids who have graduated the one with a more general degree is offered jobs all the time, the technically trained can't find work or super struggles. Companies (not all obviously) want lowest cost, that I am certain, and that means no official training from a university especially graduate degrees in things like engineering, physics, chemistry, or anything technical as much as is possible. The companies today train in what they want and that is all they want. They will let you go if that line of work fails to produce financial results so they don't want high cost employees on the books.
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Old 05-10-2019, 06:23 AM
 
1,862 posts, read 717,074 times
Reputation: 3980
Quote:
Originally Posted by TestEngr View Post
Most IT jobs, management jobs, basic financial jobs they do not want anyone trained in those areas as they think that means cost. Seems most companies today go for lowest cost and mostly that means generally trained. I am retired but of my two kids who have graduated the one with a more general degree is offered jobs all the time, the technically trained can't find work or super struggles. Companies (not all obviously) want lowest cost, that I am certain, and that means no official training from a university especially graduate degrees in things like engineering, physics, chemistry, or anything technical as much as is possible. The companies today train in what they want and that is all they want. They will let you go if that line of work fails to produce financial results so they don't want high cost employees on the books.
That's right, cheapness and low-cost employees are in. Experience, accomplishment, and excellence are out, because they are too expensive.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:33 AM
 
1,550 posts, read 402,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concept_fusion View Post
I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
It depends on the kind of jobs, yes, those with a major in the humanities are better suited. An advertising agency looks for people who have a liberal arts background, for example. But if you were looking for a job with a government vendor who is going to supply cutting-edge technology they would be looking for engineering degrees.

The thing people don't understand it seems these days, is that liberal arts colleges do offer hard science degrees. You can get a Computer Science degree from a liberal arts college. By liberal arts, it means that the requirements for the general education courses are more towards the humanities which is a very good thing. So this produced a person who is not only educated but better cultured. Courses in English such as creative writing and Philosophy are extremely important for those in pre-law. Many attorneys I know have an undergrad degree in Philosophy which many people associate with being liberal arts and don't think it applies to anything unless you are going to teach, which isn't the case.

Even in engineering there is human factors engineering, designing graphical user interfaces and these things are not pure engineering activities they have to do with how to best communicate with humans.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,152 posts, read 3,005,463 times
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Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Why wouldn't it be? When you consider the humanities and liberal arts cover an incredible range of studies a lot can be fit within them. I think the problem comes in when you get down to specific degrees. Back then a broad education provided entrance into the business world supplemented by MBA later.

Today however degrees become pigeonholes that seem to limit rather than expand career opportunity. Indeed much of the emphasis on STEM comes from schools back then, and in many ways today, don't provide as strong a preparation as for liberal arts, and in many ways discourage students, esp girls, from pursuing it.
At our university, the School of Liberal Arts includes chemistry, physics, biology, geology and other hard sciences, as well as sociology, psychology, geography and others.
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