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Old 05-10-2019, 06:00 PM
 
1,873 posts, read 725,273 times
Reputation: 4000

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Quotes A Lot View Post
A good analogy is to look at sports teams across the multiple sports leagues. Depending on their markets, some only have 1 or 2 superstars on the roster, with serviceable players around them in supporting roles. Smaller market teams generally have mostly younger players filling out their rosters due to budgetary limitations. Not many companies can afford to attract superstars in every single role in the organization. They just need people who are serviceable and can do the job at hand effectively.
Yes, that makes sense. However, being "too old" to hire at 40 or even 35 is a newer concept. So is the expansion of the gig economy and the super aggressive efforts to reduce labor costs at just about any price.

Also, I worked for companies where everyone was a top performer. You had to be in order to survive. About 3 years ago the last company that I worked for decided to get rid of ALL their top performers (everyone) with cheap employees earning about a third. This resulted in a brain drain and a loss of the company's knowledge base over the last three years. The company now is in big trouble, losing clients right and left, and even has trouble keeping its cheap employees. My, my, what an interesting situation.
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Old 05-11-2019, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,250 posts, read 8,572,788 times
Reputation: 35698
Quote:
Originally Posted by concept_fusion View Post
I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
Yes....my employer would specifically hire liberal ARTS majors and then train them in "computer science". It wasn't just because there were relatively fewer IT programs at the time but because they genuinely wanted those they perceived to be well-rounded. Also, they wanted to train people in the coding languages they used rather than try to rely on what they already knew.

Training would have had to be done anyway... Even though my then hubby had a B.S. in Computer Science (from a division of the Math Dept. - Calc. III was required) he went through the exact same training as a new hire into the IT dept. with a degree in History.

How far we have come from that!
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Old 05-11-2019, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Southern California
5,511 posts, read 8,179,733 times
Reputation: 5198
Some college majors are just useless to have & I wish colleges would just eliminate those, but of course, they never will because they want that TUITION $$$! Colleges don't care what you major in or if you get a job out of it...as long as they got their $$$ from it. Many degrees are useless UNLESS you get a PhD in it (possibly a Masters might be OK), but just an AA/AS or BA/BS, you can't do squat.

Humanities to me, always felt like one of those useless degrees, heck Education is too unless you become a teacher of course, but I was a teacher briefly & switched gears since then. But I belong to a couple of teacher discussion boards & the million dollar question teachers ask is:

What ELSE can I do w/ a degree in Education?

They ask because they didn't end up liking teaching or got burned out, etc. Teaching is very limited because it's just teaching.
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Old 05-11-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
27,417 posts, read 15,833,777 times
Reputation: 9903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I'd have to search for it, but a recent comprehensive report completely blew the idea that only STEM degrees lead to success right out of the water - many LA degrees had somewhat slower starts but could considerably exceed later and lifetime earnings over commodity tech degrees.

Most of what people think they know about degrees is mythological BS, driven by the absymal practice of choosing a field by whatever will be hot in four years, and the idea that anything not core STEM is basket-weaving.
Exactly. It is weird. Who knows what will knock STEM off and make that the new basket-weaving degree. We all know this will happen sometime soon.
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:13 PM
 
8,169 posts, read 8,654,862 times
Reputation: 9172
Quote:
Originally Posted by macrodome2 View Post
The weren't as many schools offering business degrees. I got an associate degree in 1973 and when I went to transfer to a four year state school in NY, there were only 3 schools in all of the SUNY system that offered a Bachelor's in Business and Albany was the southernmost one.

Many of my liberal arts friends who graduated with me in 1975 did not have as easy a time as I had and it took them a little while to find a job. I had a job before school ended. I actually got 3 offers.
This is true. My sibling ended up with a MBA from U of Rochester around that time and everyone asked what's a MBA? NYU was the other NY school that offered a MBA degree and believe or not, the program was considered far inferior to the program in Rochester.
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:44 PM
 
8,169 posts, read 8,654,862 times
Reputation: 9172
Many companies used to have management trainee programs for those who had a college degree when an undergraduate degree had more value. My SIL got a degree in education from a CUNY school, which had free tuition. When she did her student teaching, she discovered that she hated teaching. Through a family connection, she got into a "trainee" program at Citibank. She was in the right place at the right time. She learned about computers on the job (mainframe days) and eventually became a project manager and later a AVP (being a woman helped). Most banks had trainee programs, but it wasn't all that easy to get accepted. A connection really helped, summer job experience in a low level position, or some sort of finance background. You still didn't need the qualifications that are required today to get an entry level position in a bank.

If you had an English degree, you could go into publishing as an editorial assistant (low paying). All the major department stores offered management trainee programs to anyone with any college degree. You would start out as an assistant manager in a department. You would have to help the cashiers when they encountered problems with using the register. There were also trainee programs for

You could take a civil service test and get a civil service job. Now, you have to have experience in that particular field and take a test to be some sort of civil service clerk. You could also get a job with the post office, which was considered a good entry level job.
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Old 05-11-2019, 01:06 PM
 
3,778 posts, read 2,136,940 times
Reputation: 10308
Most degrees are useless and a waste of time. Heck, From all the horror stories Ive heard over the past decade, STEMs are a complete waste of time for most people. You're gonna be relegated to a lifetime of low pay temp work, with no bennies and ZERO job security.

Theres still some good value in the more superficial fields like Finance, Business, Accounting where you can fudge numbers and BS your way through and get a good job out of college and probably make a career out of it.

Outside of that, no point in wasting your time and money at the diploma mills these days. Plus if most companies are not going to invest in their workforce, all the expensive schooling in the world will not help you.
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Old 05-11-2019, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Where rhotic consonants are either absent or intrusive
8,908 posts, read 5,253,879 times
Reputation: 14610
I will never understand this new mindset of education being “useless” or “a waste” just because it doesn’t put you on a linear path to a career.

Last edited by Ginge McFantaPants; 05-11-2019 at 06:25 PM..
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Old 05-11-2019, 07:13 PM
 
3,778 posts, read 2,136,940 times
Reputation: 10308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginge McFantaPants View Post
I will never understand this new mindset of education being “useless” or “a waste” just because it doesn’t put you on a linear path to a career.


Whats the point of blowing 10s of thousands of dollars on higher education then? Just for the fun of it?
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Old 05-11-2019, 08:18 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
9,736 posts, read 3,712,462 times
Reputation: 19870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I'd have to search for it, but a recent comprehensive report completely blew the idea that only STEM degrees lead to success right out of the water - many LA degrees had somewhat slower starts but could considerably exceed later and lifetime earnings over commodity tech degrees.

Most of what people think they know about degrees is mythological BS, driven by the absymal practice of choosing a field by whatever will be hot in four years, and the idea that anything not core STEM is basket-weaving.
I'd like to read that report.

There was a book very popular during the recession years, telling everyone to only pick STEM degrees. The author said other majors were useless, such as learning foreign languages, English majors, etc. He didn't acknowledge that not everyone would succeed in a STEM field and those fields are not for everyone.
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