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Old 05-13-2019, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
1,136 posts, read 853,595 times
Reputation: 1657

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Quote:
Originally Posted by concept_fusion View Post
I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
If there was a time when any college degree made you desirable, it was before the baby boomers entered the workforce. This would have been prior to the 1970s, or maybe, prior to the 1960s.
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Old 05-13-2019, 09:51 AM
Status: "I believe in reincarnation" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
11,911 posts, read 4,584,978 times
Reputation: 23236
Quote:
Originally Posted by mshultz View Post
If there was a time when any college degree made you desirable, it was before the baby boomers entered the workforce. This would have been prior to the 1970s, or maybe, prior to the 1960s.
True. it was sort of a "big deal" back then when someone had a college degree. It's not a big deal anymore.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:03 AM
 
Location: In a city within a state where politicians come to get their PHDs in Corruption
1,558 posts, read 1,194,093 times
Reputation: 3144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonepa View Post
Not sure where you get your data but, based on personal experience with several friends and a wife that were high GPA English majors, that degree is most definitely not one that results in qualifications for a high demand and high compensation job. Not as bad as Art History, nor even History, but it is a dime a dozen and often results in a career as a barista.
I don't know that it's a degree necessarily, but rather the people who choose to major in liberal arts are the ones who can afford to "find themselves" during those four years, and then at the end they have nothing more to offer to potential employers other than a degree.

Now, if my undergrad liberal arts college yearly tuition ($47k right now) is any indication, there appears to be no shortage of (parents) students willing to pay for that experience.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:26 AM
 
Location: California
747 posts, read 526,722 times
Reputation: 1146
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Did you happen to read the statement I was questioning? Your parents' success, or lack of it had that happened, has no bearing on what or why I asked the one poster to give solid examples of his continued fantasy world.
No. My point was my dad graduated early enough where having a liberal arts degree wasn't a problem. Doing the same today I don't think would be possible.
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Old 05-13-2019, 11:42 AM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,235,582 times
Reputation: 2688
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
True. it was sort of a "big deal" back then when someone had a college degree. It's not a big deal anymore.
You can credit that to the soldiers returning from WWII and taking advantage of the GI Bill.
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Old 05-13-2019, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Planet Telex
4,956 posts, read 2,487,851 times
Reputation: 4686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonepa View Post
English is a dime a dozen and often results in a career as a barista.
That's odd. I don't know of any English grads working as baristas. Perhaps you meant working as a barista part-time while going to school?
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Old 05-13-2019, 01:31 PM
 
2,151 posts, read 850,505 times
Reputation: 4547
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
True. it was sort of a "big deal" back then when someone had a college degree. It's not a big deal anymore.
Yes, I remember that back then. When I was 18 years old in 1974 and entered college, my professors said that we students were the elite and tomorrow's leaders.

Today, about a third of all post-college aged people have a Bachelor's degree. But perhaps the professors are still saying the same thing in their classrooms.
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Old 05-13-2019, 01:54 PM
Status: "Here comes the sun.." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
19,176 posts, read 24,087,093 times
Reputation: 50709
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Yes. True for graduates with high GPA and/or family connections. English majors were in high demand.
They are still in high demand.
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Old 05-13-2019, 02:03 PM
Status: "I believe in reincarnation" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
11,911 posts, read 4,584,978 times
Reputation: 23236
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
Yes, I remember that back then. When I was 18 years old in 1974 and entered college, my professors said that we students were the elite and tomorrow's leaders.o
When I entered the workforce in the late 80s, it was still sort of a big deal to have a degree. And I ran across quite a few employers who did not have one, and were resentful and felt threatened by job applicants who had degrees. There were even people who would leave their degree off a resume because it made them over qualified for many jobs.

Times have changed.
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Old 05-13-2019, 02:05 PM
Status: "Here comes the sun.." (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
19,176 posts, read 24,087,093 times
Reputation: 50709
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessManIT View Post
Yes, I remember that back then. When I was 18 years old in 1974 and entered college, my professors said that we students were the elite and tomorrow's leaders.

Today, about a third of all post-college aged people have a Bachelor's degree. But perhaps the professors are still saying the same thing in their classrooms.
So 2/3rds do not. Average people do not have a baccalaureate degree. MOST people do not.
And that is going by YOUR statistics, which is rather high, according to my own research.
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