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Old 05-09-2019, 12:54 PM
 
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I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
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Old 05-09-2019, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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I'd have to search for it, but a recent comprehensive report completely blew the idea that only STEM degrees lead to success right out of the water - many LA degrees had somewhat slower starts but could considerably exceed later and lifetime earnings over commodity tech degrees.

Most of what people think they know about degrees is mythological BS, driven by the absymal practice of choosing a field by whatever will be hot in four years, and the idea that anything not core STEM is basket-weaving.
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:00 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Yes, it's true.
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:34 PM
 
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Why wouldn't it be? When you consider the humanities and liberal arts cover an incredible range of studies a lot can be fit within them. I think the problem comes in when you get down to specific degrees. Back then a broad education provided entrance into the business world supplemented by MBA later.

Today however degrees become pigeonholes that seem to limit rather than expand career opportunity. Indeed much of the emphasis on STEM comes from schools back then, and in many ways today, don't provide as strong a preparation as for liberal arts, and in many ways discourage students, esp girls, from pursuing it.
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:20 PM
 
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The weren't as many schools offering business degrees. I got an associate degree in 1973 and when I went to transfer to a four year state school in NY, there were only 3 schools in all of the SUNY system that offered a Bachelor's in Business and Albany was the southernmost one.

Many of my liberal arts friends who graduated with me in 1975 did not have as easy a time as I had and it took them a little while to find a job. I had a job before school ended. I actually got 3 offers.
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:36 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
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A lot of sales jobs go to psychology majors.
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Old 05-09-2019, 03:47 PM
 
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I still see a ton of humanities/liberal arts, social sciences, general studies, and general business grads in the workforce, young and old. After the 2008 recession, there seemed to be a huge push towards very specific technical degrees and the trades, because work was sparse for a lot of people.

Over time, it seems a lot of these undergrad degree holders find a niche area they like enough and pursue it, either by way of a experience, Master's degree, a terminal degree, or certifications.
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Old 05-09-2019, 05:26 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concept_fusion View Post
I read that up until the early 1980s, humanities majors were considered desirable by large corporations, who would hire and train them in various things. Because they were regarded as more versatile. If so, the world has really changed.
They are still considered "desirable majors". They are the most informative, broadly educational and flexible.
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Old 05-09-2019, 05:45 PM
 
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Yes. True for graduates with high GPA and/or family connections. English majors were in high demand.
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Old 05-09-2019, 05:55 PM
Status: "Disagreeing is not the same thing as trolling." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Yes. True for graduates with high GPA and/or family connections. English majors were in high demand.
I'm guessing the family connections helped more than anything else.
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