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Old 05-13-2019, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Dallas TX
15,039 posts, read 21,790,321 times
Reputation: 22262

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Congratulations on the offer! I know it is frustrating as anything. Don't give notice to your current employer until the background check is complete.

It may be six weeks before you start. I truly don't think it is going to take 4-5 weeks for it to go through.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:12 PM
 
63 posts, read 33,656 times
Reputation: 273
Default Salary offer...what is real?

So, I mentioned in another thread that I was offered a position. The recruiter asked me how much I needed to come onboard. I have lowballed myself too many times, so I told him to make an offer that was fair and that he would give to anyone else in my position with my background and experience. He then pulled out a number and said that's as high as he can go, which just so happens to be very close to what I'm currently making. What are the odds that the recruiter was telling the truth about the max he could offer? Glassdoor has the high end just a bit higher, but I work in a fairly high market salary-wise. Would you change jobs for a $2K increase, and a lateral move?

Moderator note: Threads merged.

Last edited by PJSaturn; 05-13-2019 at 06:24 PM..
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:19 PM
 
9,805 posts, read 17,032,834 times
Reputation: 18476
No, I would not unless i thought it would provide a long term promotional opportunity.
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:30 PM
 
1,580 posts, read 410,301 times
Reputation: 2925
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
So, the employer did email me this afternoon and we later spoke on the phone. Their response was that they were only offering me the lower position and that I would not receive any preferential treatment when it came time for evaluations and promotions. This sucks because I know if the higher position had been listed first, I would have applied to that one and I guarantee you that I would have at least been interviewed and very likely offered that position. I applied to the lower position because it does fit my background, though I have significantly more experience than they're asking for. I applied because I'm currently dealing with the most insane micro-managing nut of a manager I've ever had, and it's absolutely killed my morale with my current employer. I need to get out of here and I should be happy that I got this offer (for only $2K more than I'm currently making.) But it's going to kill me if I take this job and then see someone with much less experience get the higher position that I wanted.


I asked when they would want me to start. The response is that I would need to go through a background check which per the recruiter they're averaging 4-5 weeks to complete. Add in my two weeks notice and I wouldn't be starting the new job for two months. Is this normal now???


I don't know what to do. As I said, I should be happy....but I feel like I'm getting low-balled and my experience is being discounted. Yes, I know I applied for this job, and I shouldn't have applied if I didn't plan on taking the job if offered. If it weren't for my horrible current boss, I would turn it down and ask them to keep me in mind for the higher position.


Am I being unreasonable? Please feel free to knock some sense into me.
I'm a hiring manager, so please take this as an honest discussion for your benefit. If someone applies for a lower level position, HR and everyone involved views that person for that position. There is no angel in HR or a hiring manager that is going to beam into your soul and notice you should be at a higher level and promote you. Maybe working in a grocery store, but not in office jobs. They have it in their heads that since you applied for the lower level, that is the lever you are at in their eyes. And the reason is because you told them so by your actions of applying for it. People who are at the higher level wouldn't even think of applying for the lower level position, and if someone suggested they take a lower level position they would decline their interest in the company.

You have some very good things going for you. You are employed, even though you are unhappy there. We can all understand that. But I don't believe it is in your best interests long-term to jump from the frying pan into the fire. I believe you should decline this offer in a professional manner. Write a letter saying that in reflection, you feel you are better aligned for the higher level position, and if they wish to continue to consider you for that position you'd be interested in pursing that. Although you are impressed with the company, you won't be accepting the lower level position and wish them success in finding a suitable candidate for it.

If you do accept the lower level position, exactly what you fear is going to happen. They will hire someone else for the position that you aren't impressed with. That person put on their game-face, applied for that position only and convinced them they are the one for the job. They didn't apply for the lower level position because they wouldn't even consider that. You would then have to work every day with someone you know in your heart is less than stellar for the job knowing you could have done much better with it and that you were ready for the position. But you sold yourself short and accepted the lower level position.

Yes, it is flattering to get an offer, but it also feels good afterwards to have turned down an offer which you know in your heart isn't right for you.

I hope my comments are useful to you. And before anyone has a story about how someone recognized their talents and pulled them out of the mailroom to be a VP, those things aren't normal in the work place and it is a bad plan to rely on it.
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Old 05-13-2019, 05:10 PM
 
2,114 posts, read 2,100,358 times
Reputation: 3573
I agree with rummage. You will have solved your short term problem, but when the level 3 person is hired you're probably going to be unhappy and you'll be looking for another job again. Why not skip all of that and do what rummage said and move on.
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Old 05-13-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,717 posts, read 3,116,388 times
Reputation: 13135
I'd make a plausible case that you can't make the switch for less than _______, and I'd suggest at least a 10% ask. If they really want you, they'll (very likely) make a final offer for you to take or leave. If they only want someone at that salary, move on.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:47 PM
 
13,098 posts, read 13,710,829 times
Reputation: 9162
If it is a company you want to be with (it must be or you wouldn't be applying there) and if there are jobs at a higher level at that company (which there are, you've already seen that to be the case) then it seems like a good thing to get employed at that company, that is take the job they have offered.

As other jobs open up, you will be poised to advance because in addition to the experience you already have (which is good enough for them to offer you a job at this time), you will also have additional experience specific to the company, making you even more desirable.

I would say take the job they are offering and continue to apply to other job within the company.

Both times I have worked for "large" employers in my career, there have been numerous opportunities to advance within the company, and it is seen as very positive and desirable to hire and promote from within. I like that.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:51 PM
 
13,098 posts, read 13,710,829 times
Reputation: 9162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
So, the employer did email me this afternoon and we later spoke on the phone. Their response was that they were only offering me the lower position and that I would not receive any preferential treatment when it came time for evaluations and promotions. This sucks because I know if the higher position had been listed first, I would have applied to that one and I guarantee you that I would have at least been interviewed and very likely offered that position. I applied to the lower position because it does fit my background, though I have significantly more experience than they're asking for. I applied because I'm currently dealing with the most insane micro-managing nut of a manager I've ever had, and it's absolutely killed my morale with my current employer. I need to get out of here and I should be happy that I got this offer (for only $2K more than I'm currently making.) But it's going to kill me if I take this job and then see someone with much less experience get the higher position that I wanted.


I asked when they would want me to start. The response is that I would need to go through a background check which per the recruiter they're averaging 4-5 weeks to complete. Add in my two weeks notice and I wouldn't be starting the new job for two months. Is this normal now???


I don't know what to do. As I said, I should be happy....but I feel like I'm getting low-balled and my experience is being discounted. Yes, I know I applied for this job, and I shouldn't have applied if I didn't plan on taking the job if offered. If it weren't for my horrible current boss, I would turn it down and ask them to keep me in mind for the higher position.


Am I being unreasonable? Please feel free to knock some sense into me.
the bit in bold above does not make sense or sound reasonable to me.
if they wanted you for the higher level job, they would offer it to you.
it has nothing to do with whether you applied for the lower level job.

when I worked in HR, and when I have been on interview panels, if someone is too demanding or picky, then often times we don't want to deal with them. Because then they will be demanding and picky as a worker and who needs that?
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:56 PM
 
13,098 posts, read 13,710,829 times
Reputation: 9162
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicahgoChicahgo View Post
So, I mentioned in another thread that I was offered a position. The recruiter asked me how much I needed to come onboard. I have lowballed myself too many times, so I told him to make an offer that was fair and that he would give to anyone else in my position with my background and experience. He then pulled out a number and said that's as high as he can go, which just so happens to be very close to what I'm currently making. What are the odds that the recruiter was telling the truth about the max he could offer? Glassdoor has the high end just a bit higher, but I work in a fairly high market salary-wise. Would you change jobs for a $2K increase, and a lateral move?

Moderator note: Threads merged.
if someone is as miserable as you say you are in your current job, then yes absolutely change jobs for a $2K increase.


more than once I've changed jobs and taken a lateral or a decrease, and have always more than bounced back to making more, in a job i like better, with better advancement, and higher quality of work life.
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Old 05-14-2019, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
12,200 posts, read 10,413,387 times
Reputation: 33311
Change jobs if you think you will be happier in the new role/company.
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