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Old 05-11-2019, 02:20 PM
 
1,432 posts, read 801,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
Employers have to make reasonable accommodations for employees with a disability. I doubt that ignoring common sense safety requirements, even if OP doesn't think there is a need for that requirement, would qualify as a reasonable accommodation.

Sometimes people are physically unable to do certain job tasks, and they need to look into other professions.

Safety rules should be based on something other than common sense, because few people have any.
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Old 05-11-2019, 02:30 PM
 
1,432 posts, read 801,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeaSeo View Post



Thank you. It is very much of interest.
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Old 05-11-2019, 02:52 PM
 
1,432 posts, read 801,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
No I donít have a link. Google diabetic shoe stores in your area or orthopedist in your area. My mother is not diabetic but she has a lot of problems with her feet and these people are specialists. They give you very individualized attention they even came to her house to measure and look at her feet because sheís not able to get around very well. I would not get shoes this specialized online, but from a store that specializes in them and can evaluate your feet in person. Her shoes were expensive ($170 for one pair shoes and one pair slippers) but they were the only kind she can wear. But again, get a note from your doctor . Orthopedic shoes may be covered with the right diagnosis and a medical note will keep you from being fired in any case. Asking for a medical exception without anything to back it up does not sound very wise to me.



I don't have diabetes. If you don't have a link to something specific you had in mind, then I doubt whatever it is would work because I've tried every shoe ever recommended and i can't wear any of them for more than 2-3 hours even if I'm not standing or walking. But thanks for the reply.
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Old 05-11-2019, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,868 posts, read 1,259,798 times
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In some cases the employer may give a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. If the disability is documented and if it does not create an unreasonable hardship on the company; otherwise under the ADA the company does not have to grant it. For example my company is manufacturing and heavy metal components are manufactured. Steel toed boots with metatarsal guards are required in all areas of the shop; even walking in the aisleways. In this case we couldn't accommodate your request unless you had a job where you never had to go into the manufacturing area.

My prior company (also manufacturing) had a woman who had to wear orthopedic shoes and could not wear safety shoes or even close-toed shoes. That factory didn't require steel toed shoes but did require close toed shoes with hard soles. She requested an accommodation to wear soft soled, open-toed shoes. Since she worked in the office, I granted the accommodation.

However if you are in a job/industry where the shoes you wear would not be as big of an issue you can write a reasonable accommodation request letter to the company.

Here is a great resource with examples of letters, information about possible accommodations for various limitations, and links to vendors who provide adaptive products:

https://askjan.org/index.cfm

As an HR professional, I love this site and it's really helped me out in figuring out accommodations for employees who have requested them in the past.
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Old 05-11-2019, 04:38 PM
 
20,581 posts, read 16,637,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
I don't have diabetes. If you don't have a link to something specific you had in mind, then I doubt whatever it is would work because I've tried every shoe ever recommended and i can't wear any of them for more than 2-3 hours even if I'm not standing or walking. But thanks for the reply.
As I said, My mother did not have diabetes either. However diabetic footwear stores sell all sorts of orthopedic shoes. I suggested you Google diabetic shoe stores in your area or see an orthotist. They would be custom shoes developed by a certified orthotist based on whatever condition you have. If you can get a doctors prescription they might even be covered by your insurance. They are not normal off the rack shoes.

. I can’t give you a link to something specific because I don’t know what your condition is and I’m not an orthopedic shoe specialist. . And again I would not suggest you get anything online they have to be selected by a professional and fitted in person. If you don’t want to do that, then go to a podiatrist and ask him to write you a letter of medical necessity for wearing open toe shoes and see if your boss can accommodate. Those are your choices pretty much.
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Old 05-12-2019, 05:02 AM
 
Location: New Britain, CT
765 posts, read 277,485 times
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My wife works in a bank....closed toe policy. Apparently someone in the past dropped a tray of coins on her foot
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Old 05-12-2019, 07:34 AM
 
20,581 posts, read 16,637,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimG2 View Post
My wife works in a bank....closed toe policy. Apparently someone in the past dropped a tray of coins on her foot
Things do happen. One of my coworkers was cleaning up the therapy room and dropped a 2# dumbbell on a residentís foot while she was wearing open toed shoes, and fracture her toe.
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Old 05-12-2019, 08:38 AM
 
1,432 posts, read 801,508 times
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If insurance companies find out how risky not wearing steel toed boots at all times can be, they will require it at all times for coverage. Just think, that ceiling fan over your bed could fall on your foot while you sleep. A heavy frame could fall off the wall while you sweep underneath it. One of those glass jar candles could slip off the nightstand while you dust. Your 2 year old could drop a 2# dumbbell on your toe, and your Great Dane could scratch your foot.
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Old 05-12-2019, 08:48 AM
 
1,432 posts, read 801,508 times
Reputation: 2277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marie Joseph View Post
In some cases the employer may give a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. If the disability is documented and if it does not create an unreasonable hardship on the company; otherwise under the ADA the company does not have to grant it. For example my company is manufacturing and heavy metal components are manufactured. Steel toed boots with metatarsal guards are required in all areas of the shop; even walking in the aisleways. In this case we couldn't accommodate your request unless you had a job where you never had to go into the manufacturing area.



That is reasonable. There is a high risk of injury in that environment.



Quote:

My prior company (also manufacturing) had a woman who had to wear orthopedic shoes and could not wear safety shoes or even close-toed shoes. That factory didn't require steel toed shoes but did require close toed shoes with hard soles. She requested an accommodation to wear soft soled, open-toed shoes. Since she worked in the office, I granted the accommodation.

However if you are in a job/industry where the shoes you wear would not be as big of an issue you can write a reasonable accommodation request letter to the company.

Here is a great resource with examples of letters, information about possible accommodations for various limitations, and links to vendors who provide adaptive products:

https://askjan.org/index.cfm

As an HR professional, I love this site and it's really helped me out in figuring out accommodations for employees who have requested them in the past.

Thanks for the link.
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Old 05-12-2019, 09:47 AM
 
20,581 posts, read 16,637,575 times
Reputation: 38657
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
If insurance companies find out how risky not wearing steel toed boots at all times can be, they will require it at all times for coverage. Just think, that ceiling fan over your bed could fall on your foot while you sleep. A heavy frame could fall off the wall while you sweep underneath it. One of those glass jar candles could slip off the nightstand while you dust. Your 2 year old could drop a 2# dumbbell on your toe, and your Great Dane could scratch your foot.
Actually company’s workers comp insurance companies requirements are usually the reason behind workplace rules regarding hard hats, steel tie shoes, etc. and why they can’t make exceptions. Quite obviously it’s based on individual work environments, no one is requiring hard hats or steel toed shoes in an office setting.

Again in my setting, health care, no open toe shoes is based on health department requirements and hygiene.
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