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Old 05-12-2019, 03:32 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,210 posts, read 932,574 times
Reputation: 6233

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
I'm all for safety. I don't want to get hurt.


I think requirements to wear closed toe shoes when working outside are largely dreamed up. Yes, people have stubbed their toes and gotten splinters but the sky probably didn't fall. In my case, injury is unlikely if i wear open toes (none in 10 years so far) and 100% guaranteed if I wear closed toe. However the appeal of just not hiring me or getting rid of me during probation once they find out, would be high. That's why I want to know if I have any rights in this matter. I can imagine in some situations, like the industrial scenario I mentioned, I probably would not.
Long time safety and health manager here. The requirement to wear closed toe shoes are NOT dreamed up. You want to know why they re required when common sense says they aren’t needed? Because employers got tired of dealing with injuries due to open toes shoes/boots. Since you likely haven’t had to deal with that side of employment, I can assure you that it gets very expensive. Workers Comp premiums go up, and if the injury is serious enough to be recordable per OSHA, that becomes more paperwork to deal with. You mentioned splinters. Any idea how much it would cost should such a trivial thing become infected? Know who pays for that? Your employer. When it comes to work safety rules and policies, there is no such thing as dreamed up or trivial because there are way too many laws enacted to protect YOU the worker. Sounds to me like you want to do things your way regardless of company policy or safety requirements.

You need to talk to your employer about your employment “rights”, not an Internet forum.
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Old 05-12-2019, 10:21 PM
 
1,430 posts, read 800,449 times
Reputation: 2267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
Sounds to me like you want to do things your way regardless of company policy or safety requirements. .



I just want to keep working in my line of work. I'm not looking to "do things my way" I'm looking for reasonable accommodation.
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Old 05-13-2019, 04:56 PM
 
1,430 posts, read 800,449 times
Reputation: 2267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky701 View Post
YEP....There are well established reasons for safety rules.. sounds to me like the OP needs to start their own business and run it as they like until no insurance company inn America will insure them..

I already run my own part-time business, but thanks for the idea. I wear open toed shoes.



It doesn't take long for people with nothing constructive to say to ruin a thread in this forum.
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,272 posts, read 41,861,706 times
Reputation: 83139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deserterer View Post
I already run my own part-time business, but thanks for the idea. I wear open toed shoes.



It doesn't take long for people with nothing constructive to say to ruin a thread in this forum.
No one is ruining anything. They're just not saying what you want to hear. It's discussion. That's what happens here.

You're asking for something that is very unlikely and requiring VERY specific responses from posters. It's a tricky setup regardless.

You keep saying you haven't had any problems in 10 years. That just means you're due!


Seriously, good luck, OP. You may have to accept that you won't get what you want in this situation.
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Old 05-14-2019, 09:30 AM
 
2,222 posts, read 541,738 times
Reputation: 3853
You may be bucking heads with OSHA. Let's assume you are for the moment. Your employer might even agree with you, but OSHA rules are OSHA rules.

If your complicated orthopedic situation rises to the level of being a disability, then your employer has an obligation to make "reasonable accommodations" under the ADA. But OSHA would also say wearing open toed shoes is unacceptable, period, full-stop, end of discussion -- thus, your ability to wear open toed shoes would not be a "reasonable accommodation" even though you believe it would be.

You can't fight city hall.
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Old 05-14-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
14,781 posts, read 12,243,214 times
Reputation: 26209
Okay.....what will happen if you wear shoes that cover your feet for a prolong period?
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Old 05-14-2019, 10:49 PM
 
1,430 posts, read 800,449 times
Reputation: 2267
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
No one is ruining anything. They're just not saying what you want to hear. It's discussion. That's what happens here.



Some people have been quite helpful. But I've been around the group a long time so I know how these things deteriorate.
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Old 05-19-2019, 03:43 PM
 
95 posts, read 26,525 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
You do understand that most safety rules aren't dreamed up in someone's imagination, but because someone actually got hurt. Whether you could get an accommodation for your specific issue will depend a lot on what the accommodation is and what the risks of the specific job are. Kind of reminds me of a conversation I had one time:

Me (new engineer): Should we relocate these relief values? They could discharge on someone standing here.

Crusty Foreman: We always install them that way because they're easier to work on.

Me: We could turn them the other way so they discharge away from the workers.

Crusty Foreman: They aren't a problem; they never dis...…

Relief Valve: PFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFT (right in Crusty Foreman's face).

Funny, next time I came by all the relief valves were turned the way I suggested. I didn't bother to say anything.
That's a very good example of why many safety rules exist. However, the application of inflexible rules can lead to absurd situations. I have a severe hearing loss (from birth) and a one time worked in an industrial workshop where " hearing protection" was mandatory. When, I used the hearing protection, I could no longer hear the emergency alarms. It took considerable negotiation plus a medical review before an appropriate accommodation for my problem could be reached.
I hope the OP is able to find a similarly effective and flexible accommodation with their management.
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